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  #281  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 2:42 AM
Citylover94 Citylover94 is online now
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Boston's Map has changed some with new developments that have happened.

Before
Quote:
Credit goes to Photolith for this map
Now


Legend for my Map

Red- no proposal
Yellow- proposal
Green- project under construction
Blue- completed project on former parking lot

I forgot the empty lots in the Northwestern corner those are all part of the Northpoint development and have proposals or projects currently under construction to replace them.
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  #282  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 9:06 AM
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It is important to keep urban parking space available and affordable to facilitate convenient vehicular access to downtown.
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  #283  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 9:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsmartman View Post
It is important to keep urban parking space available and affordable to facilitate convenient vehicular access to downtown.
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  #284  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 12:31 PM
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Boston hasn't had convenient and definitely has never had affordable parking downtown or even near downtown at any point and it seems to be doing just fine in fact many parts of its downtown have improved as parking lots have been developed. So I don't really see why you think downtowns need lots of cheap parking.
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  #285  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2016, 7:21 PM
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Sufficient parking space is paramount to the development of office towers and the prosperity of the downtown core.

More parking space can attract more talents working in the city.
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  #286  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2016, 8:15 PM
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It's important that there be easy access to downtown, but private vehicles only need to be the method if there aren't more efficient alternatives. But options like mass transit and active transportation are much more efficient in terms of land and energy use and congestion avoidance.

If sufficient parking was paramount for the development of office towers, then Manhattan, which likely has more office towers than the next 5 largest city centres combined, would obviously look much different.
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  #287  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2016, 8:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsmartman View Post
Sufficient parking space is paramount to the development of office towers and the prosperity of the downtown core.

More parking space can attract more talents working in the city.
Yes we need to tear down old buildings to make room for parking lots. More expressways need to be built as well, to facilitate quick commuting from suburban and exurban developments to the core. Old fashioned 19th century public buildings and courthouses need to be replaced with modern space age facilities. Antiquated street fronting storefronts should make way for new climate controlled malls surrounded by plentiful parking.
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  #288  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2016, 1:01 AM
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Even Calgary has extremely limited parking downtown - and what's there is some of the most expensive in Canada. Yet it has an extremely downtown concentrated workforce and one of the highest amounts of downtown office space per capita in North America. This is a city where pretty much everyone owns a car and the primary focus of transit has been to get people downtown.
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  #289  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2016, 2:18 AM
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I'm guessing the poster was making a joke. Obviously the best downtowns have low parking ratios.
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  #290  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2016, 3:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
That's something a lot of US cities seem to be missing. A place to just people watch and be amongst the crowds.
I realize this was discussed ages ago, but I wanted to clarify some things...

There are many places to "just people watch and be amongst the crowds" in Edmonton, at least. 104 Street, Jasper Ave, Rice Howard Way, Churchill Square, the Legislature, McKay Ave, and so forth. This is without mentioning other inner neighbourhoods with plenty more of that, such as 124th St, the Victoria Promenade, Chinatown, Whyte Ave, Garneau, and increasingly, Alberta Ave. We still have a ways to go but Edmonton has a lot of potential.

Quote:
Originally Posted by seamusmcduff View Post
So I stumbled across this thread, and there was a lot if talk about how much better Canadian cities are doing than American ones. Thought I'd make this to show that isn't always the case. I think its because our prairie cities have a lot in common with most of the American cities that aren't on the coast. Unlimited room to spread, and car is king.

So anyways, ended up doing one for Edmonton. Ended up being a lot more depressing than I had realized. I knew Edmonton had a long way to go, but I don't think I'd ever grasped just how far. Anyway, obviously not all encompassing, missing a lot of proposed buildings and probably some parking lots but oh well, you get the picture.

Red=Parking Lot/Parkade, Empty Lot

Yellow= Proposed

Green=Under construction

[IMG]
Good stuff. This really highlights the toll failed urban renewal projects had on Downtown Edmonton (ie the boom went bust and the torn down buildings turned into parking lots). It's really unfortunate and makes for a very disjointed and hodgepodge core. Edmonton is very unlike cities such as Vancouver or Ottawa or even Winnipeg, where there are blocks upon blocks of intact (or with minor improvements, potential for) and walkable main streets. Edmonton is more scattered, especially downtown, where you'll have a block, maybe two of interesting urban fabric, only to be assaulted by a concrete bunker or parkade, then some infill condos with horrible street interaction, then another block of good fabric further down. It means our core isn't made up of destination districts, more just singular destinations disconnected from one another (perhaps the Arts District being an exception).

You did miss two parking lots that have been gobbled up -- the Utima lot on 103 St and the Hyatt hotel on Jasper and 96th. There are also now condo proposals for in and around 96th Street, but those have been quite recent.
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  #291  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2016, 3:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsmartman View Post
Sufficient parking space is paramount to the development of office towers and the prosperity of the downtown core.
But only in heavily car-oriented locales. The most valuable office markets in the U.S. and the world have little-to-no parking.
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  #292  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2016, 7:45 PM
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Office buildings in a downtown need to be close to each other to allow firms to interact with each other face-to-face. That's probably what companies are paying a premium for after all, otherwise they'd just choose a cheaper location in the suburbs. And parking lots just get in the way of that density and closeness and interaction.
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  #293  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2016, 9:40 PM
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Downtown locations also help with recruitment in many citiesm and particularly in certain industries where good people are heavily recruited.
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  #294  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2016, 10:34 PM
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Here is one for New Orleans.

Red: No Proposal
Green: Proposal
Blue: Under Construction (or built since the Google satellite image)

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  #295  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2016, 5:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsmartman View Post
Sufficient parking space is paramount to the development of office towers and the prosperity of the downtown core.

More parking space can attract more talents working in the city.
This is only applicable in cities with shit public transport and no rail services; not at all applicable for a city like Boston, NYC,Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, etc. That argument is only valid in cities like Tulsa, Little Rock, Colombus etc basically cities that ripped up all their trolley lines in the 1950s and never kept public transport intact or rebuilt light rail lines and instead replaced them with buses; which are usually confusing to use unless you use them all the time.
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  #296  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2016, 7:29 AM
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Edmonton is Canada's worst offender when it comes to parking lots/vacant land , by a long shot. There is no other major Canadians city that can compare to it.

I have to also reinterate what was said about Edmonton's urban form. It is a mess of disjointed urban development where an office building, a coffee shop, parking garage, commerical building, and empty lot all share the same block. There is no continuous urbanity in Edmonton just isolated bits. It makes the city very esthetically and pedestrian unfriendly which is a shame as it has a great park system and a thriving and very vibrant cultural scene.
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  #297  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 3:32 AM
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Here's a GIF showing Fort Worth's shrinking surface lots in the core, starting in the late 90s, to present day, and predicting a few years into the future with some known proposals. I did'nt do any lots west of Henderson (the road on the left) or the railroad tracks to the right, to many lots going on to even try.

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  #298  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 7:17 AM
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I bought a (small) house near Tucson for what it was costing me to park my car in San Francisco. I parked the car in the house's garage and haven't had (or needed) a car in SF since. That was 15 years ago.
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  #299  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 7:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doady View Post
Office buildings in a downtown need to be close to each other to allow firms to interact with each other face-to-face. That's probably what companies are paying a premium for after all, otherwise they'd just choose a cheaper location in the suburbs. And parking lots just get in the way of that density and closeness and interaction.
Not if their employees prefer to live in the city and don't like long commutes. That what the tech industry is used to. It's young, often single workforce likes city life and likes to walk or bike to work. The companies increasingly are opening SF satellite offices of their Silicon Valley headquarters to accommodate these people (and make recruiting them easier). Google's employees don't need to be near Adobe's. They just need to be near where they live.
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  #300  
Old Posted May 3, 2017, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ue View Post
I realize this was discussed ages ago, but I wanted to clarify some things...

There are many places to "just people watch and be amongst the crowds" in Edmonton, at least. 104 Street, Jasper Ave, Rice Howard Way, Churchill Square, the Legislature, McKay Ave, and so forth. This is without mentioning other inner neighbourhoods with plenty more of that, such as 124th St, the Victoria Promenade, Chinatown, Whyte Ave, Garneau, and increasingly, Alberta Ave. We still have a ways to go but Edmonton has a lot of potential.



Good stuff. This really highlights the toll failed urban renewal projects had on Downtown Edmonton (ie the boom went bust and the torn down buildings turned into parking lots). It's really unfortunate and makes for a very disjointed and hodgepodge core. Edmonton is very unlike cities such as Vancouver or Ottawa or even Winnipeg, where there are blocks upon blocks of intact (or with minor improvements, potential for) and walkable main streets. Edmonton is more scattered, especially downtown, where you'll have a block, maybe two of interesting urban fabric, only to be assaulted by a concrete bunker or parkade, then some infill condos with horrible street interaction, then another block of good fabric further down. It means our core isn't made up of destination districts, more just singular destinations disconnected from one another (perhaps the Arts District being an exception).

You did miss two parking lots that have been gobbled up -- the Utima lot on 103 St and the Hyatt hotel on Jasper and 96th. There are also now condo proposals for in and around 96th Street, but those have been quite recent.
Edmonton is probably the one major Canadian city with a downtown more pock marked than Hamilton, but both cities are certainly turning around now with lots of new proposals. Let's look forward to new thriving streets for both.
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