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  #45041  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 2:28 AM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
We have visited the Laguna Beach Victor Hugo several times in the past; here's a slide to add to the collection.


"Laguna Beach California Rare 1950s Victor Hugo Inn Los Angeles - original slide"


ebay



Sharp looking Mercury at the left in ER's previous photo.Charming slice of life photo from long ago. Thanks ER.

In the 1950s it was a kid friendly restaurant in an idyllic setting.
Restaurant is still there in 2018 but now known as Las Brisas. The flower gardens are gone. The Laguna Beach Art Gallery is next door.


Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Jan 20, 2018 at 4:36 AM.
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  #45042  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 5:11 AM
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Exclusive for NLA!

For those who can't get enough of the Hotel Virginia, here are Hotel Virginia pix from the secret files of the odinthor collection, not published on my site.










For the following two, I tamed down the too-garish colors of the primitivist-tending originals . . .






all images from the odinthor collection.
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  #45043  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 5:54 AM
sadykadie2 sadykadie2 is offline
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Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
Exclusive for NLA!

For those who can't get enough of the Hotel Virginia, here are Hotel Virginia pix from the secret files of the odinthor collection, not published on my site.










For the following two, I tamed down the too-garish colors of the primitivist-tending originals . . .






all images from the odinthor collection.
Wowsa! Book me a room
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  #45044  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 11:58 AM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Well said, PM-- one of the things I've always liked about NLA is that there ARE no "like" buttons etc. And that contributors actually dig. I follow a Facebook page called SoCal Historic Architecture, probably 50% or more of the contents of which is what might be to us here "basic" LA history--pictures of city hall, say, or Crossroads of the World etc. Nothing indepth or involving research, but they get plenty of "likes." There is one rather shameless contributor who has clearly been culling NLA posts all the way back to the begining of NLA, including text, and posting it verbatim to the FB page...he gets plenty of likes, but it's all recycled--no original content. (The sort of desperate need of people for the empty "likes" on FB has been much written about, hasn't it?) Anyway...I suppose the more our finds find eyes, the better.
Has anyone confronted this guy? One of the reasons I don't come around much anymore is because a couple of years ago one of the (then) regulars got in the habit of simply poaching things directly from my Flickr account, sometimes within thirty minutes of me putting the image up and posting it over here as something he had discovered. It got old and I decided I'd mosey along. Sounds suspiciously like the same guy. I don't have a Facebook account so can't really go look at this page.
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  #45045  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 1:15 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
Exclusive for NLA!

For those who can't get enough of the Hotel Virginia, here are Hotel Virginia pix from the secret files of the odinthor collection, not published on my site.

No room at this Inn?

In 1915, it might have been worth traveling south to Del Mar, to visit the newly constructed (1910) Stratford Inn (and an area known for Torrey Pines). The "Inn" later became the Hotel Del Mar in '26, and stuck around for another five decades. https://www.laubergedelmar.com/resor...-hotel-history


Quote:
The Southern California beach resort, L'Auberge Del Mar is located on the historic site of The Stratford Inn, built in 1910, which became the Hotel Del Mar in 1926. A hot spot for Hollywood celebrities and Southern California locals alike, the Hotel Del Mar was the perfect accompaniment to Bing Crosby & Pat O'Brien's Del Mar Fairgrounds and Racetrack. Celebrities such as Lucy and Desi Arnaz, and Jimmy Durante frequented the beach resort often.

During World War II, the beachside hotel became home to soldiers and their families. After the war, the hotel never regained the popularity it once held, fell into disrepair and in 1969, was torn down. In 1985, coinciding with Del Mar's centennial, local resident Jim Watkins purchased the property and rebuilt the hotel with an intention to draw people back to Del Mar. L'Auberge Del Mar opened its doors in 1989.https://www.laubergedelmar.com/resor...-hotel-history
https://www.laubergedelmar.com/asset...y-masthead.jpg



Stratford Inn, circa 1915
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...27a825b802.jpg



Another alternative - without the beachfront? Head northeast to the Hollywood Hotel. Perhaps the good folk at the Virginia will call ahead.

1915, Hollywood Hotel
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...9d46dd8663.jpg



http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...4a5.jpghttp://

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=40475

Last edited by Tourmaline; Jan 19, 2018 at 2:11 PM.
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  #45046  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 1:28 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Has anyone confronted this guy? One of the reasons I don't come around much anymore is because a couple of years ago one of the (then) regulars got in the habit of simply poaching things directly from my Flickr account, sometimes within thirty minutes of me putting the image up and posting it over here as something he had discovered. It got old and I decided I'd mosey along. Sounds suspiciously like the same guy. I don't have a Facebook account so can't really go look at this page.

Not wanting to create a big stink on the FB page, I think I've managed to make it clear that some are on to the poster's m.o. by pointing out the original NLA source. In all fairness, the FB page is all about surface (as is all of FB), which attracts people just passing time--no one on FB really wants research or thought of any depth, just pretty pictures--which, it must be said, is one way of appreciating a subject, a legitimate one, that has its place. When I look at the FB arch pages, though, I can really appreciate the value of NLA, which seems made up of actual brilliant amateur researchers, if not officially of professional caliber. Wonderfully quirky individuals too. Artists of a sort. One can't help but be protective. Ok, back to research trenches....

PS-- I may have missed it, but has NLA actually gotten beyond annual tributes to the BD? Has she joined the cliché status of city hall or the Hollywood sign?
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  #45047  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 1:47 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Not wanting to create a big stink on the FB page, I think I've managed to make it clear that some are on to the poster's m.o. by pointing out the original NLA source. In all fairness, the FB page is all about surface (as is all of FB), which attracts people just passing time--no one on FB really wants research or thought of any depth, just pretty pictures--which, it must be said, is one way of appreciating a subject, a legitimate one, that has its place. When I look at the FB arch pages, though, I can really appreciate the value of NLA, which seems made up of actual brilliant amateur researchers, if not officially of professional caliber. Wonderfully quirky individuals too. Artists of a sort. One can't help but be protective. Ok, back to research trenches....

PS-- I may have missed it, but has NLA actually gotten beyond annual tributes to the BD? Has she joined the cliché status of city hall or the Hollywood sign?
Yeah, I was surprised (mildly) that she didn't show up this year. I pruned our rose bushes on her anniversary as a commemoration (at Larry Harnisch's suggestion). I don't do it every year. Sometimes I forget.
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  #45048  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 4:08 PM
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odinthor odinthor is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
[...]
PS-- I may have missed it, but has NLA actually gotten beyond annual tributes to the BD? [...]
Tributes to Brent Dickerson are always welcome, but never encouraged.
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  #45049  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 5:54 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Another view of the Huntington cottage, now with a library, which some sources suggest was constructed post 1920. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Library In this instance, "the" source, Huntington, provides date, circa 1918. http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single.../id/107/rec/40


In 1935, the "library/art museum" said to have been designed in 1920, appeared like this. Wonder what kind of crowds it drew then.
Fortunately, not much has changed except for the size of the collections and . . . the crowd.
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...9920f2a9b6.jpg



http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...37609ad7e7.jpg
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  #45050  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 6:10 PM
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Hi all.

I received a couple requests this past week. If anyone has some spare time this weekend

#1________________________________________________________________________

Hello Mr. reality,

Did I really just say that?

Forgive me for being comical.

I am new to the forum and I am looking for assistance with photographs of the Aliso Manufactured Gas Plant.

Are you aware of sources for photographs of Aliso manufacture gas plant in operation? Or really any photographs inside or out

in and around the Aliso MGP between 1864 and 1950.

Any help or contacts would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks


#2__________________________________________________________________________



Can you help me find old photos of 4236 Griffin Ave in Los Angeles

We’re trying to restore the site of an old signal gas station but we would like to restore it to its original Art Deco style

and your thread seem to be the authority when it comes to L.A. history any help would be greatly appreciated.

my name is Fred

_______________________________________________________________

thanks in advance fellow noirishers.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 19, 2018 at 6:25 PM.
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  #45051  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2018, 6:11 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
An aerial view of the Japanese Gardens in the Hollywood Hills. aka Bernheimer Estate.



postcard



Below: Another great view of the Japanese Garden complex.
You can pick out the Rollin B. Lane residence (1909) center left, which would later become the 'Magic Castle'.


postcard










Below: And I LOVE this strange snapshot.

The two girls are a block south of Grauman's. (you can see the theater's roof towering over the lamps & shade store)
If you look closely, you can see the Japanese Gardens (now Yamashiro) up on the Hill above the sassy redhead.



slide, ebay




The owner of the Japanese Gardens in Hollywood, also had a residence and gardens in Pacific Palisades.


postcard




http://www.image-archeology.com/Bern...sidence_CA.htm




Here is the website for Yamashiro.

http://www.yamashirorestaurant.com/

Cue the orchestra. Structure in foreground is clearly magical .


1915
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...093020a419.jpg




1915, Berhnheimer residence aka, Yamashiro's.
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...61f09625bc.jpg




1934 - Bernheimer Residence
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...1fb19c3a31.jpg
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  #45052  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 1:24 AM
rick m rick m is offline
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Originally Posted by Beaudry View Post
So we all know the story of the Hershey house—how Almira took her pad at Fourth & Grand and in 1907 hauled it a couple blocks west down Fourth to Hope, had Neher & Skilling enlarge it, and it became the Castle Apts, looming over Flower Street and parts beyond.

lapl & Christina Rice

I'd always sort of wondered, since the Castle Towers is much larger, and we don't have an image of 350 S Grand on the Fourth St side, exactly what Neher & Skilling did. I just came upon a newspaper image that elucidates somewhat—I'm not sure what paper it's from as the image doesn't turn up in the Herald or the Times in newspapers.com. Take a look:



They cut it in two parts (about 3/4 of the western part of the Fourth St side, 1/4 of the eastern part of the Fourth St side), hauled it down Fourth and propped it up on the cliff, and built around it from the ground up, filling in the middle, until it looked like this:



Note the black lines in the image above showing the demarcation between the old building and the new, becoming the building we all know and love (did y'all see this post by John Bengston?).

Leaving the question, though, who designed 350 S Grand? I think it was Oliver Perry Dennis, of Dennis & Farwell fame.

First off, Mira Hershey gets a permit to build a two-story dwelling at the NE corner in May of '96, that's 350. Don't know the architect. But, Mira buys the lot across the street in October of '98 and by early '99 she's got OP Dennis-designed buildings going up at 355 and a "ten-room frame and stone residence" on the same lot at 356 S Bunker Hill. These three:



(Do we have a good image of 356?) Anyway, look at the similarities between 355 (which we know as Dennis) and 350.


lapl

They're the only two Chateauesque buildings on the Hill, commissioned by the same woman, two-1/2 years apart. (You have to imagine 355 as having more ornamentation, of course; in the 1930s pic it looks like it's had a reroofing which removed some of the ornamentation. Compare: )usc

Also interesting, Mira builds 350 in '96 and in '97 Cornelia Hill has Dennis & Farwell build this house in Redlands (later known as Kimberly Crest):

pacifichorticulture

Now it's said that Cornelia wanted the house to look like the architecture she'd seen in the Loire Valley. My theory is Cornelia saw what Mira had built and asked her "Who are your architects? I want something like that!"
See LAPL... L.A. Residences-Bunker Hill item A-004-109.18 for a crumbly rooftop view which I i.d.ed for the sadly departed Carol Kozo Cole about 10 years ago-- Must've been taken from the Briggs not long before it's razing. The old Daily News (c. 1952 ?) image also over at UCLA Young Library.
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  #45053  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 6:52 AM
Lorendoc Lorendoc is offline
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Cohen House

I was once again browsing through Calisphere pictures and fell into another rabbit hole.

Here are two photographs, part of the architect S. Charles Lee papers in the Special Collections department at UCLA. They are labelled "Cohen House, Los Angeles, street view" and "Cohen House, Los Angeles, entry view...Hancock Park." So we can assume Mr. Lee was the architect for Mr. Cohen's house, and the house was in Hancock Park.

calisphere.org


calisphere.org

Could it be found, did it survive?

The architect's name is familiar to the regulars here. tovangar2 made a excellent post about him two years ago here.

Per Wikipedia's article on Lee:
"Simeon Charles Levi was born in Chicago in 1899 to American-born parents of German-Jewish ancestry, Julius and Hattie (Stiller) Levi. He grew up going to vaudeville theatres, nickelodeons,and early movie houses...In 1922, Lee moved to Los Angeles. His first major movie palace was the Tower Theatre, a Spanish-Romanesque-Moorish design that launched a career that would make Lee the principal designer of motion picture theaters in Los Angeles during the 1930s and 1940s. He is credited with designing over 400 theaters throughout California and Mexico. His palatial and Baroque Los Angeles Theatre (1931) is regarded by many architectural historians as the finest theater building in Los Angeles.

Lee was an early proponent of Art Deco and Moderne style theaters, including Fresno's Tower Theatre. The Bruin Theater (1937) and Academy Theatre (1939) are among his most characteristic. The latter, located in Inglewood, California, is a prime example of Lee's successful response to the automobile. After World War II, Lee recognized that the grand theater building had become a thing of the past, and began to focus on new technologies in industrial architecture."
OK so back to the task of locating the Cohen house. Google was spectacularly unhelpful, even including "-Mickey" in the search field. (Mickey never lived in Hancock Park.) The only hit I found was in a book called "The Show Starts on the Sidewalk: An Architectural History of the Movie Theater" by Maggie Valentine. She is speaking of Lee's work:


google books

But, no address is given.

So I decided to look through the (many) Cohens in the 1929 LA city directory and use the Googlemobile to examine addresses which might be suspicious for Hancock Park locations. About halfway through, I found the following:

ancestry.com

And here is what's at 619 S June in 2011:


GSV

and here it's under construction last September (they added a wine cellar and elevator):

GSV

I hate that they got rid of the asymmetrical flagging on the driveway, the theme had been carried all the way up to the entrance.

That this is the right building is seen on the 1927 building permit,
blurrily showing M. M. Cohen as the owner and S. Charles Lee as the architect.

LADBS

So who was M. M. Cohen? There is a Wikipedia entry for "Maury Cohen" which, in the way of Wikipedia, conflates the stories of two different people. Our Cohen, the June street resident, was Maurice Mair Cohen (1889-1949). Born in Moscow, he moved to Chicago before his first birthday. He started out in clothing and furniture businesses both in Chicago and here. He became a producer at Poverty Row in the 1930s, moved to Beverly Hills, and co-founded the Palladium in 1940 with Norman Chandler's money, it was said. He died of a heart ailment at Cedars of Lebanon in September, 1949. Lee and Cohen may have known each other in Chicago before each made it big. In any case I am happy the house is still there, even if it needed a wine cellar and elevator to survive.

Last edited by Lorendoc; Jan 20, 2018 at 8:19 PM.
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  #45054  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 8:39 AM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorendoc View Post
I was once again browsing through Calisphere pictures and fell into another rabbit hole.


calisphere.org



But, no address was given.
And here is what's at 619 S June in 2011:


GSV

:

GSV


.
The new repaint job with the tedious dark outlines is hideous in the extreme. The original color was elegant and charming. Beautifully understated.
Such blistering pain I hope to not endure again...I need a cold compress for my damaged eyes and maybe brain too.

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Jan 20, 2018 at 2:38 PM.
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  #45055  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 10:20 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Hi all.

I received a couple requests this past week. If anyone has some spare time this weekend

#1________________________________________________________________________

Hello Mr. reality,

Did I really just say that?

Forgive me for being comical.

I am new to the forum and I am looking for assistance with photographs of the Aliso Manufactured Gas Plant.

Are you aware of sources for photographs of Aliso manufacture gas plant in operation? Or really any photographs inside or out

in and around the Aliso MGP between 1864 and 1950.

Any help or contacts would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks


#2__________________________________________________________________________



Can you help me find old photos of 4236 Griffin Ave in Los Angeles

We’re trying to restore the site of an old signal gas station but we would like to restore it to its original Art Deco style

and your thread seem to be the authority when it comes to L.A. history any help would be greatly appreciated.

my name is Fred

_______________________________________________________________

thanks in advance fellow noirishers.
I have a request....as many pics of the grand old Richfield Oil Co. tower (built in the 1920s) in DTLA as can be posted. Loved that old building from my youth. Torn down in 1968/69 to make way for the construction of ARCO twin towers. I still remember the grand spire shaped like an oil derrick lit up at night. Something to behold. Would love to see some nightime pics with the spire lit up. The only building almost as grand is the blue Eastern Columbia, which fortunately is still there.
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  #45056  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 10:31 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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[QUOTE=ethereal_reality;8052481]We have visited the Laguna Beach Victor Hugo several times in the past; here's a slide to add to the collection.


ebay

"Laguna Beach California Rare 1950s Victor Hugo Inn Los Angeles - original slide"

When I was a kid in the 1950s and early 1960s my family used to vacation in Laguna Beach every summer. There used to be a long haired older man they called "the greeter" who would stand on the sidewalk and wave to the tourists. Today he would look like just another homeless person, but back then he was a tourist attraction. Any pictures of "the greeter"? Up in L.A. around the same years, there was a similar eccentric long haired man named "Gypsy Boots", who I believe roamed around Venice Beach and was known as a health food advocate.

Last edited by CaliNative; Jan 20, 2018 at 10:43 AM.
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  #45057  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 11:24 AM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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[QUOTE=CaliNative;8054034]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post



When I was a kid in the 1950s and early 1960s my family used to vacation in Laguna Beach every summer. There used to be a long haired older man they called "the greeter" who would stand on the sidewalk and wave to the tourists. Today he would look like just another homeless person, but back then he was a tourist attraction. Any pictures of "the greeter"? Up in L.A. around the same years, there was a similar eccentric long haired man named "Gypsy Boots", who I believe roamed around Venice Beach and was known as a health food advocate.
1975....there were several greeters, he was not the only one.


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6...697ea91970c-pi
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  #45058  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 11:24 AM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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The new repaint job with the tedious dark outlines is hideous in the extreme. The original color was elegant and charming. Beautifully understated.
Such blistering pain I hope to not endure again...I need a cool compress for my damaged eyes.
I agree, that's dreadful. I require my fainting couch.
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  #45059  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 11:27 AM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
In 1935, the "library/art museum" said to have been designed in 1920, appeared like this. Wonder what kind of crowds it drew then.
Fortunately, not much has changed except for the size of the collections and . . . the crowd.
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...9920f2a9b6.jpg


http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...37609ad7e7.jpg
I almost didn't recognize the back of the old Huntington residence(European Art) with all the foliage on it. Other than that, looks pretty much the same now. Why yes, I've got lots of current pictures.
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  #45060  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2018, 2:50 PM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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BillinGlendaleCA I almost didn't recognize the back of the old Huntington residence(European Art) with all the foliage on it. Other than that, looks pretty much the same now.

.Same view circa 2017.... greenery stripped from the facade of the grandiose 1919 Georgian mansion....once the home of Henry and Arabella Huntington in San Marino... it now masquerades as an art museum.
The various former domestic rooms are now ''art galleries''. When I first visited the place I opened a few closed-off doors to see where the old bathrooms, closets and kitchens were located. Alas, they had all been transformed into storerooms and repositories for cleaning supplies. The vast complex has 475 employees, is spotless and well provided for with a billion dollar endowment.

The divorced Henry acquired a colossal fortune when he married [ in 1913] his second wife Arabella Huntington, his patrimonial uncle's widow and they set about to furnish their palatial new home with far and away the greatest collection of 18th-century British portraits ever assembled by any one man on earth. Of course money was no object. For the record, one might say wife number two, Arabella, could be called Mrs. Huntington-Huntington.

In 2018, Mr. Huntington might not recognize San Marino the little town [13K people] that he helped found in 1913. There is not a single home in the city under one million dollars [median price is $3 million ] and the population is 46% Chinese...multimillionaire refugees from Hong Kong and other Asian countries.

You might ask, how do these Chinese immigrants pay for their San Marino homes? They usually pay in gold bars....I know this from my experience with them.



https://i.pinimg.com/564x/b3/16/f9/b...san-marino.jpg

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Jan 20, 2018 at 5:28 PM.
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