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  #141  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 9:00 PM
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It’s a long route over land to Iqaluit. Kimmirut would make more sense if you were to run the rail line all the way south. Iqaluit is Ice bound and as this last season proved can be ice clogged even during shipping season.
The Hudson Strait if semi navigable during the winter. And the possibility of a deep water port makes it possible to bring a ship in all year round.

Igloolik elder know that the mine is good for the community even if it affect the walrus hunting.

Another interesting fact. Nunavut will have more kms of rail lines than roads
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  #142  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 9:19 PM
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Hahaha really? What other rail lines are there? Or is it just that there is that few roads? Hasn't there been talk about building a road from iqaluit to the one town about 50km away? I dunno it's name tho.
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  #143  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 9:21 PM
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When mining ore, you'll want a railroad, not just a road.
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  #144  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 9:36 PM
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Well yes of course, especially mining in the tundra. I wasn't surprised about that just surprised that this railroad will exceed the sum length of all Nunavut roads.
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  #145  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadillaccc View Post
Hahaha really? What other rail lines are there? Or is it just that there is that few roads? Hasn't there been talk about building a road from iqaluit to the one town about 50km away? I dunno it's name tho.
There is a road to Iqaluit's suburb (Apex) but it is only about 10km from the centre of Iqaluit.
The road you mentioned is a road to Kimmirut. This is over 100kms that would take the road to a proposed Hydro dam.

Most roads in Nunavut are from the local airport to town. Usually only a few kms. The longest is probably the road from Whale Cove to the airport.

Then there is the proposed road from Rankin inlet to the Angio Eagle gold mine and that will be about 70kms.
Other proposed roads are one up the west coast of Hudson Bay and then the road to Bathurst Inlet
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  #146  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 10:54 PM
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Well yes of course, especially mining in the tundra. I wasn't surprised about that just surprised that this railroad will exceed the sum length of all Nunavut roads.
Not alot of real tundra along the route but there are sensitive Inuit/Dorset sites
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  #147  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2012, 7:41 AM
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I'm surprised no one has noticed this significant development for Nunavut, Northern Quebec, and Labrador. This will drive the price of the Internet service down for the affected communities, etc. Affected communities will get 6 to 7 times the bandwidth for the same price as the current satellite technology.

http://arcticfibre.com/

All of their presentations provide full of info:
http://arcticfibre.com/?page_id=361

Quote:
From the official website:
Basically, Arctic Fibre, a Toronto company, wants to lay undersea fibre-optic cables hence will provide a shortcut between Tokyo and London, as well as Tokyo to NYC by going through the Northwest Passage. So, this will reduce latency between the three cities, which is very important for stock markets in the these 3 cities.

There will be 4 cables to be laid down the NW Passage, each with 80 wavelengths of bandwidth capacity of 100 Gbps per second (a capacity of 32 terabits for the entire network).

- 3 cables allocated for Tokyo - London Express, with a stop at midpoint station at Cambirdge Bay to amplify signals. Hence, the capacity will be 24 terabits per second.

- Fourth cable with capacity of 8 terabits per second operating as local service from Tokyo to NYC touching:
--> Alaska: Nome, Kotzebue, Wainwight, Barrow and Prudhoe Bay
--> Labrador: Nain
--> Newfoundland: Milton (to hook up with the rest of East Coast)
--> Quebec: Montreal (latency will drop to 129ms)
--> Nunavut: Cambridge Bay, Taloyoak, Gjoa Haven, Igloolik, Hall Beach, Cape Dorset, and the first recipient of this service come 2014 (and if approved), Iqaluit. If I read it right, these residents (52% of Nunavut's population) will enjoy unlimited bandwidth.
--> This cable will land somewhere between Chisasibi, QC and Moosonee, ON, which provide opportunities to hook up with the south.
--> The mentioned communities above will get much faster Internet service without federal government assistance. Instead, their installation fees have been paid (i.e. subsidized) by international carriers and domestic companies.

Federal government assistance will be required to hook up secondary backbone and spurs to Northern Quebec, mainland Nunavut, Sanikiluaq, the rest of Baffin Island communities, Kugluktuk, as well as Resolute.

The proposal no longer includes Tuktoyaktuk (despite being included in the map) because it will also receive its share of fibre optic cables by the time the NWT Highway 8 is extended from Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk and NWT Highway 1 is extended from Wrigley to Inuvik, which will allow fibre optic cables from Edmonton to reach all communities along the Mackenzie River Valley Corridor, which includes Tuktoyaktuk. This means that this project will entirely bypass NWT.

Arctic Fibre will also partner up with another company (WireIE) to provide microwave extensions for Kimmirut, Baker Lake, Whale Cove, Kugaaruk, Repulse Bay and Arctic Bay. They will get a minimum internet service speed of 50 Mbps, with a low-cost upgrade to 1 Gbps.

This will leave only Grise Fiord to remain dependent on satellite transmissions. However, despite that, Grise Fiord will be able to double its bandwidth thanks to the undersea fibre optic cables. The most expensive section will be from Pond Inlet to Resolute, which will cost $30.6 million to serve only 200 people, but remember, Resolute is a strategic location for the Canadian Forces, so it is likely they will pull it through despite the price tag. If the Resolute extension wouldn't happen, then only 1% of Nunavut's population (343 people) will remain dependent on satellites.

Total federal government assistance needed to hook up the communities at the secondary network will amount to $192M. This will be easy money, especially that they have given NWT and Nunavut funds for housing money costing $1B.

Before finalizing the project, they sought for demand for both international and domestic network. Apparently, the response was incredible, with massive companies like Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Bell and Rogers joining the bandwagon. Many Asian, American, Canadian, and European companies have joined as well.

Since there is enough demand, they have applied to Industry Canada for federal funding and landing permits, and have applied to Japan and UK for cable landing permits. They are also close to an agreement on US carriers for Alaskan communities. Ex-Iqaluit mayor Madeleine Redfern is currently assisting the company to overcome regulatory hurdles concerning Nunavut.

Once built, Arctic Fibre will sell bandwidth to telecommunication companies, government, stock traders, etc.

Well, there were concerns for icebergs hitting and destroying the cable. Apparently, they have argued that the fibre optic cable between Norway and Svalbard has not been damaged by icebergs, and the southern Greenland fibre optic cable network is done by horizontal drilling, a method that they will implement in laying these cables.

Telesat, opposes the idea by cost and iceberg concerns. Nunavut Broadband Development Corporation is also opposing, saying that every Nunavut community should be connected by fibre optic cable, not just a few communities. (So does that mean that if Toronto gets a subway line, should all communities of Ontario get a subway line?)
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  #148  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2012, 1:22 PM
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Has this proposal received government approval?
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  #149  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2012, 8:52 PM
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Has this proposal received government approval?
Not yet. They just filed for cable landing permits 2 months ago (for UK, Japan, and here in Canada).
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  #150  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2012, 10:08 PM
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Izok Corridor: road, mine, arctic port

Tories mull a Chinese plan for Izok Corridor that could bring billions of dollars to Nunavut

Quote:
Another massive Chinese-owned resource project is before Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet.

Some time in the new year, four federal ministers are to decide how to conduct an environmental review for the Izok Corridor proposal. It could bring many billions of dollars into the Arctic but would also see development of open-pit mines, roads, ports and other facilities in the centre of calving grounds for the fragile Bathurst caribou herd.

It would be hard to exaggerate the proposal’s scope. Centred at Izok Lake, about 260 kilometres southeast of Kugluktuk, the project would stretch throughout a vast swath of western Nunavut.

Izok Lake would have five separate underground and open-pit mines producing lead, zinc and copper. Another site at High Lake, 300 kilometres to the northeast, would have another three mines.

MMG also wants a processing plant that could handle 6,000 tonnes of ore a day, tank farms for 35 million litres of diesel, two permanent camps totalling 1,000 beds, airstrips and a 350-kilometre all-weather road with 70 bridges that would stretch from Izok Lake to Grays Bay on the central Arctic coast.

MMG plans a port there that could accommodate ships of up to 50,000 tonnes that would make 16 round trips a year — both east and west — through the Northwest Passage.
read more here: http://business.financialpost.com/20...rs-to-nunavut/
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  #151  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2013, 5:13 AM
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This is interesting. http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/canad...204727531.html

Quote:
Federal government poised to cede powers to the Northwest Territories
By Andy Radia | Canada Politics – 8 hours ago

In many ways, the Northwest Territories is like the Rodney Dangerfield of Canada — it gets very little respect.

That might change in the next couple of weeks.

Officials from NWT are in Ottawa this week to hammer out an agreement which would cede federal control over land, resources and water to the territorial government. It's a historical move that the Globe and Mail characterizes as making the Northwest Territories into "a province in all but name."


"Much of the territorial government has arrived in Ottawa. Premier Bob McLeod, his cabinet, deputy ministers and aboriginal and business leaders begin two days of talks Wednesday with Prime Minister Stephen Harper and officials.

The people and government of the territory stand to benefit from hundreds of millions of dollars in new resource revenues under the agreement, which will see the territorial and not the federal government primarily responsible for approving resource developments."

The process of devolution — as it's called — happened in the Yukon in 2003 and has contributed to that jurisdiction's buoyant economy.

For the NWT, devolution means it can can take control over and earn revenues on its oil and gas reserves and growing number of mining projects. According to Northern News Services, the new powers will allow the territory to keep up to 50 per cent of resource revenues.
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  #152  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2013, 5:54 AM
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Wow that is great. Hopefully that will help to make the population begin to grow again. Yukon has been showing impressive growth since it was granted control of its own finances and resources, has grown by 4 000 people since 2006. NWT has basically hovered around 41 000 since 2006... but between 2001 and 2006 it grew by over 4 000 people. This will hopefully help to attract companies and people, will definitely influence infrastructure improvements territory-wide!
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  #153  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2013, 3:28 PM
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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/...e-testing.html
Seems A380 is in Iqaluit again. They realy need to build a proper test centre there
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  #154  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2013, 6:37 PM
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Construction of a fixed-link crossing of the MacKenzie River near Fort Providence began in 2008 and opened November 30, 2012. This is the first time there has been a permanent all weather crossing linking Yellowknife, the capital of the Northwest Territories, with the rest of the Canadian highway network. Previously motorists had to use the MV Merv Hardie ferry in the summer and an ice bridge in the winter, with a significant interruption in spring and fall.

The project was plagued with construction delays and budget overruns. The bridge is 1.045 kilometres long (1.6km including the approach causeways), 10.4 meters wide, and has 27.2 meters of clearance for shipping, requiring a 3.5% grade on the bridge deck. The cost of construction was 202 million CAD.

Deh Cho is the traditional name of the MacKenzie River by the local Dene people, and means "big water".

This image was shot from the south side of the river, east of the bridge.
15 image panorama, stitched using hugin. It's a little soft, as I had to hand-hold at 300mm.



Much bigger:
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  #155  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2013, 2:48 AM
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That's an awesome bridge. I'd love for it to pave the way to higher populations up north.
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  #156  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2013, 3:08 AM
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Well I know the population of Yukon and Nunavut are growing quite healthily, and now that the Feds are divesting nominally provincial powers to NWT, they will start to get a much greater return on resource revenues and will be able to funnel more into infrastructure and job creation hopefully. That would definitely spur some growth up there. Hopefully more oil exploration as well.
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  #157  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2013, 3:22 AM
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Amazing shot (rather, stitching of several) of a fantastic structure. So glad that the North is finally getting some crucial bits of infrastructure attended to.
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  #158  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 6:26 PM
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Bathurst Inlet Road Project

It looks like the Hacket River- Bathurst Inlet Road Project is being revived.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/stor...t-xstrata.html
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  #159  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2013, 5:44 PM
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It's a good thing that Canada is expanding the north an making it more modern for its citizens away from big urban areas. I'm in favor!
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  #160  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2013, 6:43 PM
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Devolution is right now being announced. Hope the two other groups who have not signed will come to an agreement of some sort.
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