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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 3:08 PM
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wong21fr wong21fr is offline
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Originally Posted by CIA View Post
I hear this a lot from DC folks, but personally I find the architecture for the new buildings in DC rather interesting. I think you guys are spoiled in that the rest of the country, it's not unusual to see new developments like this:

That's 17th Street Plaza in Denver- it was built in 1982 so it's not exactly a new development.
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  #42  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 5:44 PM
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cannedairspray cannedairspray is offline
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Cirrus, why don't you think Silver Spring isn't growing as fast as Tyson's? From a density perspective, it's always been my favorite of the newish suburbs.

(That is to say, it's my favorite other than the obvious Alexandria choice, which as old as Silver Spring may be, can't compare to)
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  #43  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 6:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cannedairspray View Post
Cirrus, why don't you think Silver Spring isn't growing as fast as Tyson's? From a density perspective, it's always been my favorite of the newish suburbs.

(That is to say, it's my favorite other than the obvious Alexandria choice, which as old as Silver Spring may be, can't compare to)
I grew up in Silver Spring--about 5 miles from the DC line. In 1949 when my family moved there, it was the edge of the urbanized metro. We lived on the edge of a pine forest.

Silver Spring, for those who may not know the history, was founded in the Civil War era after Lincoln's Post Office Secretary, Francis Preston Blair, supposedly discovered a clear ("silver") spring in the exurbs of the capital. So it's post Civil War and mostly post WW II (its nucleus in and around Georgia Ave. and Rt. 29 is pre-War, of course and there were some historic structures--places that were way out in the "country" originally, like the "Toll House Inn" that supposedly invented "toll house" (chocolate chip) cookies.

Alexandria, on the other hand, is colonial era.
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  #44  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
This quote almost reminded me of Hunger Games. The capital city prospers while the post-industrial hinterlands starves.
Would you rather have a national capital that was in bad shape?! Let's celebrate what DC has become, and is continuing to become, instead of making false analogies with fictional movies.
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  #45  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2018, 11:31 PM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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Originally Posted by dabcom View Post
Would you rather have a national capital that was in bad shape?! Let's celebrate what DC has become, and is continuing to become, instead of making false analogies with fictional movies.
Are there any national capitals anywhere that are in bad shape compared to the rest of the country? I can't think of any. Again, I said "compared to the rest of the country."
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  #46  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 1:41 AM
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Silver Spring probably has the best artists on the region at the moment! Great area. Shame about Discovery but they will be fine.

And @Cirrus - your posts always on point but still hit dogs holler. Also see Fuller's widely disseminated article from this week

Last edited by Eightball; Jan 12, 2018 at 2:12 AM.
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  #47  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 1:51 AM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Are there any national capitals anywhere that are in bad shape compared to the rest of the country? I can't think of any. Again, I said "compared to the rest of the country."
I was talking about what DC used to be, in pretty bad shape, compared to what it is now, a thriving metropolis. 20-30 years ago, DC was crime-ridden and decrepit, so it's a good thing the city is in much better shape right now. Cities like Ottawa, Canada and Canberra, Australia are pretty dull cowtowns even though they're their respective nations' capitals. And besides, many national capitals are also their nations' financial hubs (i.e. London, Paris, Madrid, Tokyo, Mexico City), so of course they're going to be in better shape than the rest of the country. DC is not, but it is still thriving.
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  #48  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 2:11 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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Right but I was responding to what you were responding to also.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 11:56 AM
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Hi.I didn't read all the pages, but it's good to hear D.C is having a boom right now.Cranes are a good thing!..I got the Gyst that they are re-zoning to ease up on height restrictions in certain areas? This is what peaked my interest if this is the case. Ottawa is a much smaller metro, but there are certainly some parallels in that Ottawa is a capital city with a strict height restriction as well.As a result, it's inner city is also very dense relative to it's size..The other parallel, is that the feds/municipal government here have also alleviated the rules on their height restriction a little bit outside of the core.
there is actually a 40 story condo being constructed, and more to come..It's good to see.I also agree with how clever developers must be when developing shorter buildings to maximize space in metros like D.C..I've never been to Washington, but by all accounts it has some fantastic Urban neighborhoods, and yes! Density always wins IMO.
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  #50  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 12:41 PM
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Dc has been booming for 30 years now. Basically since tony Williams became mayor. This isn't some new development.
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  #51  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 1:57 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Right but I was responding to what you were responding to also.
The question was if someone would prefer a shitty capital to a nice one. Whether or not other countries have shitty ones is a non sequitur.
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  #52  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 2:44 PM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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Originally Posted by cannedairspray View Post
The question was if someone would prefer a shitty capital to a nice one. Whether or not other countries have shitty ones is a non sequitur.
Which is why I asked what country doesn't have a nice capital? Other than war torn countries, pretty much every capital is nice. It is by necessity otherwise government officials wouldn't want to or in some cases can't operate there and would move it. Even with all of its issues, relatively speaking, Washington wasn't in that bad of a shape 30-40 years ago. It was by American standards but still was a nice capital by international standards.
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  #53  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 5:05 PM
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  #54  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 5:06 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Are there any national capitals anywhere that are in bad shape compared to the rest of the country? I can't think of any. Again, I said "compared to the rest of the country."
Berlin, maybe? Much poorer than the nation as a whole.

Northern Italians might also argue Rome, which isn't poor for Italian standards but is poor compared to Milan or Turin.
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  #55  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 5:35 PM
llamaorama llamaorama is offline
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Sure but Rome is...Rome... What it lacks in present day economic might it makes up for in millenia old historic cultural influence. It's one of the great old world cities like Istanbul, Cairo, and Beijing.

I think what he's asking is some national capital equivalent to Albany or Jefferson City. Going through my mental list of world capitals I am having a hard time finding one, especially in any "advanced" country in Europe, North America, East Asia, etc etc. Kyoto is not the biggest Japanese city but its still damn urban. Bern is not necessarily the #1 swiss city but its a decentralized country, Wellington and Canberra are small but not by the standards of that part of the world. Belmopan, Belize is a contender, but Belize as a whole is so small and its a modern planned city. There are many countries with new planned cities as capitals dating to the 50's, 60's, and later, but most of those cities have grown a little since and the ones that aren't are kind of tenous in their status(Napiydaw for example is a sort of a mess, if the Burmese have a regime change will it still exist?). Likewise Putrajaya is not done yet and was a suburb of KL anywyas.

Last edited by llamaorama; Jan 12, 2018 at 5:50 PM.
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  #56  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:15 PM
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Originally Posted by llamaorama View Post
Sure but Rome is...Rome... What it lacks in present day economic might it makes up for in millenia old historic cultural influence. It's one of the great old world cities like Istanbul, Cairo, and Beijing.

I think what he's asking is some national capital equivalent to Albany or Jefferson City.
I doubt Albany or Jefferson City are poorer than their states as a whole. I know Albany has fairly high incomes and economic growth.

Or are you talking size/importance? Plenty of capitals are small, relatively unimportant backwaters. Canberra, Islamabad, Pretoria, Abuja, Brasilia, Kotte, Sucre, possibly Ottawa; heck even DC relative to nation's overall economic might.

But, yeah, national capitals tend to be dominant in terms of population and economy. 90% of capitals are the most important cities.
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  #57  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:30 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Even with all of its issues, relatively speaking, Washington wasn't in that bad of a shape 30-40 years ago. It was by American standards but still was a nice capital by international standards.
Southeast and parts of Northeast were pretty bad. In 1963, after high school graduation, I had a summer job at the Washington Navy Yard. One day on the way home, while stopped at a stop light, 4 kids ran out and stole all 4 of my hub caps. It was that kind of place. One quadrant of the city or more were simply "no-go" places for white people. My Mom graduated from Roosevelt High School in DC--she preferred not to reveal that fact by the 1960s the DC schools had become so bad. And then, of course, in 1968 they burned parts of it down.

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  #58  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:35 PM
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Minato Ku Minato Ku is offline
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A capital and the biggest city represent the country to the world.
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Berlin, maybe? Much poorer than the nation as a whole.
Not anymore (the wealth of Berlin is average, poorer than western german cities but not as poor as it used to be), and Berlin is booming. We can't say that Berlin is a bad shape, not anymore.

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Originally Posted by llamaorama View Post
Kyoto is not the biggest Japanese city but its still damn urban.
Kyoto is not the capital of Japan, it's Tokyo. The biggest and primary city.
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  #59  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:46 PM
llamaorama llamaorama is offline
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Kyoto is not the capital of Japan, it's Tokyo. The biggest and primary city.
I mean, historically it was.

I guess Ottawa is a decent example of what I was imagining, though its not that small. Really what I am trying to think of is a national capital which is not a late 19th/20th century or later planned city but is also not considered to be a top major city in its own country(which Ottawa is).

Quote:
Or are you talking size/importance? Plenty of capitals are small, relatively unimportant backwaters. Canberra, Islamabad, Pretoria, Abuja, Brasilia, Kotte, Sucre, possibly Ottawa; heck even DC relative to nation's overall economic might.
I thought Bolivia was one of those countries had multiple capitals? La Paz and Sucre.
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  #60  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Minato Ku View Post
A capital and the biggest city represent the country to the world.
You do realize that such a statement is senseless in a super large federation like that of the US, right?
NYC, LA and Chicago are the most representative cities of their country abroad, and that's the way it will be for this entire century.
Yet NYC isn't even their local state administrative capital.

I guess business, culture and political power are sometimes 3 different concepts.

As for Tokyo and Paris, we French and the Japanese have been fascinated by each other for long, so that's a particular case.

I grew up on mangas and silly Japanese anime series myself. That's some sweet easy part of my childhood. The Koreans living in France are jealous of our fascination for Japan.
This is something peculiar between us.
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