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  #1  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2015, 8:36 PM
Norman Bates Norman Bates is offline
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McKellar Towns at Benjamin Private

In the past few weeks I've driven past this site a few times. It's on the north east corner of Woodroofe and the Queensway. I couldn't find any other reference to it here on SSP. Looks to be interesting.

http://www.mckellartowns.com
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  #2  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2015, 10:14 PM
Marshsparrow Marshsparrow is offline
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seems pricey!
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  #3  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 4:31 PM
Schattenjager Schattenjager is offline
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McKellar Park isn't exactly close to this location. According to Wikipedia, it belongs in the Whitehaven neighbourhood.
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  #4  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 4:47 PM
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waterloowarrior waterloowarrior is offline
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  #5  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 5:59 PM
Norman Bates Norman Bates is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterloowarrior View Post
Yep, that's it!
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  #6  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2015, 7:35 PM
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ac888yow ac888yow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schattenjager View Post
McKellar Park isn't exactly close to this location. According to Wikipedia, it belongs in the Whitehaven neighbourhood.
McKellar "Park" isn't, but McKellar "Heights" is (possibly equally prestigious and sought after *). Clearly they're invoking the McKellar name to help with marketing.

* Jason Spezza used to live there for example. Last I checked his home on Hare Ave was still listed at a cool ~1.4.
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  #7  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2015, 5:35 PM
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rocketphish rocketphish is offline
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From this (2013):




To this (2015):



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  #8  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2015, 9:30 PM
Proof Sheet Proof Sheet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketphish View Post
From this (2013):




To this (2015):



The final page of this document seems to still show what you indicate is the 2013 version. Not sure where the 2015 version comes from. Not the first time that City is not up to date.

http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Im...or%20Plans.PDF
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  #9  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2015, 11:50 PM
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rocketphish rocketphish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proof Sheet View Post
The final page of this document seems to still show what you indicate is the 2013 version. Not sure where the 2015 version comes from. Not the first time that City is not up to date.

http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Im...or%20Plans.PDF
Yes, that's where it comes from, as linked from post #4, see above.

And the 2015 version comes right off their own web page, noted in post #1, above.
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  #10  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2015, 4:32 PM
Capital Shaun Capital Shaun is offline
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I prefer the 2013 renders because they're a bit more colorful. The 2015 ones look too cookie cutter for my tastes.
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  #11  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2018, 5:23 PM
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West end residents blast 'bait and switch' student housing
Rental building with 97 bedrooms planned for site where neighbours had expected 8 townhomes

Susan Burgess · CBC News
Posted: Jul 04, 2018 5:34 AM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago




Glabar Park residents and their city councillor have been caught off guard by plans for a 97-bedroom rental building for students on the site of a former bungalow.

In 2013, a developer sought approval to build eight townhouses on the parcel of land at Woodroffe Avenue near the Queensway, and discussed the plan at a community meeting that same year.

However, that developer sold the property to Smart Living Properties before building the units, and the townhouses with three bedrooms each plus a den have morphed into 16 rental units with four, five and eight bedrooms apiece.

"I was just floored when I saw it was going to be eight-bedroom units," said Catharine Nedd, who lives nearby with her husband and two children.

Nedd learned about the new plan by accident last weekend, she said, when she saw units advertised for rent this September. Wondering if they might be suitable for a family member moving to the city, she visited the website for the development called Algonquin Place and discovered the new layouts.

"I think the city has really let us down," said Nedd, who attended the 2013 community meeting about the original plan.

David Maxwell, Nedd's neighbour across the street, called it a "bait and switch."

"If a property switches like this, I think the new developer is beholden to the plan that was there before," Maxwell said. "If they're going to change it there should be a new consultation process put in place so the surrounding neighbours are made aware of it."

Both Maxwell and Nedd said they were fine with the original plan, but worry the new development will dramatically increase traffic in the neighbourhood.

Smart Living Properties, which owns the new development, confirmed the units are being marketed to Algonquin College students.

The former owner's plan fell apart because there wasn't a market for the townhomes that were planned, said Jeremy Silburt, senior consultant for developments at Smart Living Properties. Reconfiguring the plan for the building didn't require additional community consultation, he said, and made the venture financially sound.

"This was something that was a viable solution to a piece of property that was kind of an oddball," Silburt said, noting the site's proximity to a Queensway off-ramp, a church and a school.

The new development will have only 10 parking spaces, but Silburt said he expects few students will have cars because of nearby access to public transit and the popularity of ride-hailing services such as Uber.

Having developed other student housing in Sandy Hill, Silburt said he's well aware of the controversy that frequently dogs it, but argued that as a purpose-built development, Algonquin Place will be free of the problems associated with single-family homes converted to student residences.

Garbage will be collected in dumpsters and picked up by a private service, Silburt said, while noise from student parties will be unlikely to trouble the neighbours since the nearby church and school aren't likely to be occupied in the evenings.

Mark Taylor, the Ottawa city councillor for the area, said he's "completely opposed" to it and agreed with residents' accusations of a bait and switch.

"We seemed to be playing fair ball with a fair developer who wasn't going to turn around and try to sneak something through the back door," Taylor said. "Unfortunately, it seems they sold it to somebody and that is exactly what they did."

Taylor's comments echo those made last fall by his colleague David Chernushenko, who fought a similar battle over a ballooning number of bedrooms in a development in Old Ottawa South, and who complained of developers finding loopholes faster than city council could close them.

In the case of Algonquin Place, the development was approved before new rules passed by city council just last month. Those rules cap the number of bedrooms in a single dwelling at four bedrooms, unless a developer applies for an "oversize dwelling" designation which permits up to eight bedrooms in a detached home.

Taylor said he intends to take his concerns about Algonquin Place to the city's general manager of planning and its legal department to see if there's any way to stop it, but suggested it was unlikely given that no rules have been broken.

Glabar Park's experience highlights the need for a mechanism at city hall to alert the public to big changes in a developer's plan, Taylor said.

"There wasn't any kind of internal city process to flag this, and say wait a minute, this needs to at least come back to the ward councillor to make them aware that the changes are taking place," Taylor said. "So there's an opportunity to engage with the community."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...park-1.4732424
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  #12  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2018, 5:27 PM
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This is now known as:

Algonquin Place
975 Woodroffe Ave.

https://www.smartlivingcanada.com/pr...lgonquin-place




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  #13  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 2:05 AM
Proof Sheet Proof Sheet is offline
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This property on Woodroffe is run by the company that used to be known as Takyan Consulting which was notorious for being a poor landlord. They changed their company name as the Takyan name wasn't helping them anymore.
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  #14  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2018, 3:24 AM
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Controversy over west-end student residence leads city to explore changes
Building permit issued for 8-unit development in 2013, but property now has 89 bedrooms

Leah Hansen · CBC News
Posted: Nov 18, 2018 6:00 AM ET | Last Updated: November 18


The City of Ottawa's planning department says it will explore policy changes after a proposal to build eight townhouse units in a west-end neighbourhood ballooned into an 89-bed student residence.

The initial Glabar Park building, which called for four bedrooms per unit, was approved in 2013 following public consultations.

But the original developer then sold the property to another developer, Smart Living Properties, before construction began.

By this summer, the project had morphed into a 16-unit, 97-bedroom complex for student living called Algonquin Place, in what residents called a "bait and switch."

Bay ward Coun. Mark Taylor submitted an inquiry to the city's planning department in July, asking how the proposal had swelled to such proportions.

The department released its written response on Nov. 13, giving the reasons and pledging to explore whether more policy changes are needed to prevent it from happening again.

In its response, the planning department said the developer made "five separate building permit revision applications" between June 2017 and July 2018.

The requested changes did not warrant a full site plan revision application, the department wrote, so they were approved through the building permit process without triggering a need to hold public consultations or alert the area's councillor.

"Each amendment was fairly small, but cumulatively, it turned out to have a big impact," Taylor said. "Because they didn't do it all at once, it didn't send up any internal flags."

The revisions included changes to the layout of the units to increase the bedroom count, and the conversion of garage space into more living area.

Smart Living Properties, however, didn't actually break any rules — at the time, neither the bylaws nor the provincial building code limited the number of bedrooms a unit could contain.

A new amendment to zoning bylaws came into effect in June 2018, and according to the department's response, the same development proposal would not be approved if it was submitted today.

Under the new amendments, the project would have been limited to "four bedrooms each in all the units." The complex that's currently under construction advertises four, five and eight-bedroom units.

The eight-bedroom units appear to be offered on a room-by-room basis on the Smart Living Properties website — but that also wouldn't be allowed under the new rules, which place stricter limits on rooming houses, the department wrote.

Taylor said after the city sat down with the developers, they reduced the number of bedrooms to 89 and pledged to have a superintendent on-site to manage the student residence.

Attempts to reach a spokesperson for Smart Living Properties Saturday were unsuccessful.

Because the permits for the complex were issued before the bylaw amendments came into force, the project is now nearly complete, leaving neighbours feeling cheated by the process.

Heidi Pfeifer lives in the Glabar Park neighbourhood, and helped organize meetings between residents, the city and developers.

She said with students expected to begin moving into the new building in January, members of the community are left with little recourse.

"I don't think we had the opportunity to do anything differently," she said. "That's what makes me upset, is that I don't know that there are lessons learned here."

"It gives me very little faith in my city."

Taylor said few people involved in the process were ultimately happy with the outcome.

"The city approved something that the residents were all right with," he said. "The city kind of got bamboozled into the outcome as well."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottaw...nges-1.4910395
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