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  #621  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2017, 12:04 AM
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rocketphish rocketphish is offline
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...and there's a survey of the 5 choices at the end of the CBC article, here:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...rial-1.4006738
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  #622  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2017, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Uhuniau View Post
Toppling lenin yes yes yes
That just reminds me of this other loser:

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  #623  
Old Posted May 17, 2017, 10:43 PM
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Arc of Memory 'living calendar' chosen for Memorial to Victims of Communism

Andrew Seymour, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: May 17, 2017 | Last Updated: May 17, 2017 4:29 PM EDT




A sculpture of bronze rods configured in a giant arc and intended to act as a “living calendar” has been chosen as the winning design for the Memorial to the Victims of Communism.

The design, unveiled Wednesday, marks the latest, and perhaps one of the final chapters, in the saga of a monument that has stirred immense controversy in the capital.

The Arc of Memory was chosen by Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly after public consultations in March 2017 and on the recommendations of a jury of design professionals. It was one of five designs shortlisted by the Department of Canadian Heritage.

The design was created by Toronto architect and artist Paul Raff, designer and arborist Michael A. Ormston-Holloway, and landscape architects Brett Hoornaert and Luke Kairys.

It features two gently curving wall-like metal frames that will support more than 4,000 bronze rods. Those will be densely arranged along 365 steel fins. Each one will point at a unique angle of the sun, for every hour of every day, across a year, Canadian Heritage explained.

The memorial will be split in the middle at winter solstice, “inviting visitors to step through in a metaphorical journey from darkness and oppression to lightness and liberty.”

“It’s a three-dimensional calendar, where every moment can be identified, seen and touched, and where key collective moments, like the fall of the Berlin Wall … can be inscribed and expressed as a moment in time,” said Raff. “It’s something that can bring the history tangibly, visibly, into the present.”

The sculpture, which will sit in a corner on the west side of the Garden of the Provinces and Territories, between Wellington and Sparks streets, is roughly four metres high and 21 metres long.

Construction is expected to cost $3 million and be completed sometime in 2018, said MP Arif Virani, parliamentary secretary to the minister of Canadian Heritage, who announced the selection.

The federal government has committed half of that amount, along with an additional $500,000 for the design process. The other $1.5 million is being raised by the charity Tribute to Liberty. The new design still requires National Capital Commission approval.

Joly was in Montreal with the prime minister to mark Montreal’s 375th anniversary on Wednesday and didn’t attend the announcement.

Virani said the chosen design met requirements that included public support, aesthetic value and cost. It also has a “bold visionary component” and is “testament to the hardship and persecution people have faced and demonstrating that Canada is indeed a land of refuge,” Virani said.

Tribute to Liberty has already provided $1 million of donations to the federal government, and its chair said that outstanding pledges made to their charity will cover the remaining half a million dollars needed to pay for its share of the project once construction begins.

The project has taken a long, winding road. The earlier monument’s proposed location, near the Supreme Court of Canada, was heavily criticized, as was its initial design and size.

The new design will be much smaller than the previous monument, which was to take up 60 per cent of a 5,000-square-metre site. It was later reduced in size to about a third of the site, and later cancelled by the then-new Liberal government.

Tribute to Liberty chair Ludwik Klimkowski said there had been “misconceptions” about the size and placement of the earlier monument, but that he is pleased now with both the new site and the chosen design.

“It still embeds itself within the parliamentary precinct,” said Klimkowski. The planned redevelopment of Lebreton Flats to include a hockey arena could mean considerably more foot traffic for their new site, he said.

“This particular design is equally, if not more, inclusive, inviting, inspiring and it really enlightens you,” he said.

Ottawa architect Barry Padolsky, an outspoken critic of the original monument, said the new design is fairly abstract but “perfectly respectable and possibly even imaginative scheme that is more universal than it’s specific.

“It’s a modest, human-scale monument. It’s not something that will be an eyesore on the landscape,” he said.

About eight million Canadians trace their roots to countries that lived or still live under Communism. The memorial is intended to recognize Canada’s role providing refuge for those who fled Communism regimes.


TALE OF THE TAPE

Size


New monument: 21 metres long and about four metres tall, divided into two walls.

Canadian Heritage couldn’t provide the monument’s exact footprint, but said during public consultations earlier this year that the new monument was expected to be between 200 and 500 square metres.

Original monument: Originally planned to occupy about 3,000 square metres; it was later scaled back to about 1,700 square metres. The height of the monument was also reduced by about half to five metres.

Cost

New monument: $3 million, evenly split between charity Tribute to Liberty and the federal government. The department of Canadian Heritage also covered an additional $500,000 for design costs.

Original monument: $5.5 million. The previous Conservative government would have funded up to $4 million of that amount.

Location

New monument: Western corner of the Garden of the Provinces and Territories, which is between Wellington Street and Sparks Street on the western edge of downtown.

Original monument: In front of the Supreme Court of Canada on a 5,000-square-metre plot of land that had previously been earmarked for a new federal justice building.

Design

New monument: A sculptural array of bronze roads configured into a gigantic arc that features two gently curving wall-like metal frames roughly four metres tall and 21 metres long supporting 4,000 short bronze rods.

Original monument: A large viewing platform looked down on ascending folded concrete rows, rising about nine metres at their highest point. The rows were to feature 100 million fingertip-size “memory squares” that visitors could walk among and touch to “viscerally experience the overwhelming scale of the Communist atrocities.” The size of the monument was later scaled back.

aseymour@postmedia.com
Twitter.com/andrew_seymour

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...s-of-communism
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  #624  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 1:36 AM
Norman Bates Norman Bates is online now
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I honestly like the sound of this new brass rod design. I just hope that it will be built in such a way that it doesn't get stolen for scrap metal.
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  #625  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 3:48 AM
zzptichka zzptichka is online now
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Funny that the winning design was dead last in the CBC poll posted above with 8%.
I actually remember voting for it myself. That sun calendar feature has a neat ring to it that makes it worthwhile to visit and explore.
I just wish they fix that giant empty plaza in front of it.
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  #626  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 12:19 PM
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This monument is still too damn big!
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  #627  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 2:30 PM
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At least it looks artsy and neutral enough that it doesn't scream anti-Communism... a passerby would probably just think it's a typical public art project and it looks good as one.
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  #628  
Old Posted May 19, 2017, 1:12 PM
AndyMEng AndyMEng is offline
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Originally Posted by 1overcosc View Post
At least it looks artsy and neutral enough that it doesn't scream anti-Communism... a passerby would probably just think it's a typical public art project and it looks good as one.
From the description, it seems to me that the rendering lumps all of the elements into large pieces, where in reality it is going to be thousands of small pieces? I'm looking forward to seeing the real thing (or a more accurate rendering?)
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  #629  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:42 PM
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Ottawa Communism memorial set to be built in 2018
Private group has raised necessary funds and government anticipates starting work in 2018.

By: Ryan Tumilty, Metro
Published on Sun Oct 15 2017


The National Memorial to the Victims of Communism is on schedule to start construction next year, with the private group helping to get it built already having delivered its share of the funds.

The memorial was first proposed in 2009 and was proposed to go closer to the Supreme Court. Once in office, the Liberal government reviewed the project and settled on a spot in the garden of the provinces and territories along Wellington Street.

After a competition between five proposed designs, the government settled on a design called Arc of Memory. The proposal is an abstract bronze sculpture that reflects light in different ways based on sunlight.

The sculpture consists of two curved wall-like metal frames that span 21 metres and rises about four metres in height, holding more than 4,000 bronze rods along 365 steel fins.

David Larose, a spokesperson for the Heritage Department, said working is moving ahead on the project.

“The design contract is in place with the winning team. Design development work continues to move ahead on schedule,” he said.

This phase will lead to tender documents in the lead-up to construction work, which is scheduled to begin in 2018.

The project has been estimated to cost $3 million, with half of that funding coming from Tribute to Liberty, a private group set up in 2008 with the goal of building a memorial in the capital region.

Ludwik Klimkowski, chair of the group’s board, said the fundraising went well.

“Earlier this year we have also given a $1 million out of the $1.5 million we pledged to raise,” he said.

He said the remaining $500,000 the group has to raise will be transferred to the government when they put the project out to tender.

“We will be ready to give $500,000 when it’s needed.”

The memorial is set to be unveiled at the end of 2018.

http://www.metronews.ca/news/ottawa/...t-in-2018.html
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  #630  
Old Posted May 28, 2018, 6:19 PM
zzptichka zzptichka is online now
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Shovels in the ground

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  #631  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 11:46 AM
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NCC looks at separating cyclists and pedestrians on more pathways

Jon Willing, Ottawa Citizen
Updated: June 21, 2018



<snip>


Final design approved for the Memorial to the Victims of Communism



Construction on the Memorial to the Victims of Communism is scheduled to begin this summer now that the NCC has approved the final design.

The memorial will be in the Garden of the Provinces and Territories between Wellington Street and Sparks Street, west of Bay Street.

Construction will cost $2 million, plus $50,000 for soil decontamination. The non-profit organization Tribute to Liberty is matching government funds to build the memorial.

The unveiling is scheduled for summer 2019.

The NCC says maintenance costs will gradually increase over 25 years, from $19,000 in Year 1 to $475,000 in Year 25. The agency, so far, has enough money for just over 12 years of maintenance. It will have to talk further with Canadian Heritage and the memorial design team about the lifecycle work.

The NCC must also negotiate with the City of Ottawa to use municipal land for the construction of the memorial.

An existing art installation, Twelve Points in a Classical Balance by artist Chung Hung, will be relocated to the nearby Bronson Park, which overlooks the Garden of the Provinces and Territories.


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twitter.com/JonathanWilling

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...-more-pathways
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