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  #11481  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2019, 7:53 PM
City Wide City Wide is offline
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^^^
If your intent is to get all those different, and often at cross purposes, groups to come to agreement, then nothing would ever get built!

The Blue Horizon proposal seems to be a real job. The Post brothers aren't known for having a light touch, bottom line rules the day with them. I don't see why the old front section of the building can't be saved and reused and the back, younger and not very special part of the building be torn down. There's plenty of lot size and a tower could be built without having to do any over build.
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  #11482  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2019, 8:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Wide View Post
^^^
If your intent is to get all those different, and often at cross purposes, groups to come to agreement, then nothing would ever get built!

The Blue Horizon proposal seems to be a real job. The Post brothers aren't known for having a light touch, bottom line rules the day with them. I don't see why the old front section of the building can't be saved and reused and the back, younger and not very special part of the building be torn down. There's plenty of lot size and a tower could be built without having to do any over build.
CORRECTION: Post Brothers (the Pestronk brothers) are NOT involved. The Orens Bros. are.

"The $22 million project is being developed by a partnership between Orens Bros. Real Estate Inc. and Mosaic Capital Partners, both of Philadelphia."

http://www.philly.com/real-estate/co...-20190115.html
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  #11483  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2019, 8:21 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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Originally Posted by City Wide View Post
^^^
If your intent is to get all those different, and often at cross purposes, groups to come to agreement, then nothing would ever get built!
I don't know, maybe and it's not really worthwhile to explore a fantasy. But I wish something could be done to consolidate all these various commissions and mandatory meetings, some have teeth, some don't. It's confusing, it's time consuming, expensive, and each group is working in a silo, not concerned about the greater good but focused on narrow mandates. No one is saying, yea, maybe such and such project could be built with better materials and some immediate neighbors might be inconvenienced but if it adds revenue, vibrancy, and jobs, isn't that a good thing and doesn't that trump all the other, more trivial concerns? I just think a more holistic and streamlined approach is needed. And also, none of this forums have a place for city officials to explain to NIMBYs how their demand to reduce the number of units/floors in a certain project impacts the city's coffers both in the short term (RE transfer fees) and the long term (RE taxes after the abatement).
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  #11484  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2019, 2:47 AM
Daario Daario is offline
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Damn. If I was king of the world, there would be a single committee to review a project holistically, with input from a preservationist (to assess any historical implications), an economist (to weigh in on how a project will impact city revenues), an urban planner (to assess how a project impacts the streetscape), an architect (design recommendations), a zoning expert, and a neighborhood advocate (to rep the NIMBYs). Their word would be final.

And to hell with the myriad of committees and red tape.
I feel like you basically just described the different fields/departments within the city planning profession.
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  #11485  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2019, 11:53 AM
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As Old City booms, new buildings struggle to make themselves part of the neighborhood | Inga Saffron
These two projects are just the beginning of massive change in Old City. At least two high-rise towers have been proposed, along with several townhouse developments. The National and 218 Arch have established an important precedent. They’ve shown that new buildings can earn their place in the neighborhood by paying attention to the past.
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  #11486  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 5:41 AM
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Here's a pair of articles from Hidden City on historic preservation, one on buildings lost in 2018, one on buildings saved.

https://hiddencityphila.org/2018/12/...dings-of-2018/

https://hiddencityphila.org/2019/01/...saved-in-2018/
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  #11487  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 4:38 PM
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  #11488  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 4:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Aaamazarite View Post
I really like how they're planning on opening it up along Market street. Could be a great space around the station.
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  #11489  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 4:57 PM
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Consider me whlemed. On the plus side I like reintegrating the building and surrounding area with the street. On the downside, how is there on a single residential unit planned for that massive lot, which is next to an El station?
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  #11490  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 2:15 PM
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Durst to buy another site along the Delaware River

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The Durst Organization is making its second acquisition along Philadelphia’s Delaware River waterfront, moving to buy a surface parking lot located between Vine and Callowhill streets on the west side of Columbus Boulevard.

The Delaware River Waterfront Corp. has entered into an agreement with the New York real estate company to purchase and eventually develop the 1.6-acre property referred to as the Vine Street lot at 300-346 N. Columbus Blvd. into a mixed-use development. The property sits across from four piers Durst bought in 2017, that could create an unparalleled synergy between the two locations.
More: https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel..._news_headline
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  #11491  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 2:25 PM
Justin7 Justin7 is offline
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Please build something comes right up to the sidewalk here. One Water is a disaster.
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  #11492  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 3:13 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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^ When you make such dramatic statements, is it so difficult to add context so we know what you're talking about? I feel like you do this routinely.

Your post implies that One Water is a disaster b/c it is not built up to the sidewalk, but it is. So what's your beef with this building? It's certainly not a winning an architectural awards and it is a little fortified from the sidewalk but the Delaware Waterfront is very much a work in progress and measured against previous developments here, One Water Street is definitely a step in the right direction - it's built to the sidewalk and has retail spaces (are they filled? My guess is not). The street is still building the critical mass of people needed to sustain retail and create the feelings of a cohesive neighborhood. Not there yet, but again, One Water Street is a step in that direction. I wouldn't call it a disaster by any means. Waterfront Square - now that's a disaster, with its unfinished tops and orientation away from the sidewalk, hidden behind a gate.
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  #11493  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 3:43 PM
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
^ When you make such dramatic statements, is it so difficult to add context so we know what you're talking about? I feel like you do this routinely.

Your post implies that One Water is a disaster b/c it is not built up to the sidewalk, but it is. So what's your beef with this building? It's certainly not a winning an architectural awards and it is a little fortified from the sidewalk but the Delaware Waterfront is very much a work in progress and measured against previous developments here, One Water Street is definitely a step in the right direction - it's built to the sidewalk and has retail spaces (are they filled? My guess is not). The street is still building the critical mass of people needed to sustain retail and create the feelings of a cohesive neighborhood. Not there yet, but again, One Water Street is a step in that direction. I wouldn't call it a disaster by any means. Waterfront Square - now that's a disaster, with its unfinished tops and orientation away from the sidewalk, hidden behind a gate.
I agree that one water was somewhat of a pioneer so I'm more forgiving than if it was being built in a more developed area with established foot traffic. However, retail spaces notwithstanding, how could you possibly say it is built to the sidewalk? The majority of its Delaware Ave frontage is landscaping in front of a parking garage. I mean you even linked to it, so you know what it looks like. That's not what people mean at all when they say "built to the sidewalk."
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  #11494  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 3:54 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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I guess it's not to the sidewalk like we see in Center City proper. But it's pretty good and certainly not a "disaster". The building is still oriented to the sidewalk and has a retail space. Definitely better than the long blank wall at the Hyatt or the enormous setbacks that define Waterfront Square and Sugar House.

Measured against these buildings - or the big box shopping centers - and it's clear that One Water Street is so much better in the way in meets the street. Perfect? No. But again, it's a step in the right direction.
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  #11495  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 5:02 PM
Yurkek Yurkek is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
I guess it's not to the sidewalk like we see in Center City proper. But it's pretty good and certainly not a "disaster". The building is still oriented to the sidewalk and has a retail space. Definitely better than the long blank wall at the Hyatt or the enormous setbacks that define Waterfront Square and Sugar House.

Measured against these buildings - or the big box shopping centers - and it's clear that One Water Street is so much better in the way in meets the street. Perfect? No. But again, it's a step in the right direction.
I live in One Water and this building isn't as great as you assume. There isn't a retail space and the quality of the construction is poor. For some reason they decided not to cover concrete columns with aluminum panels on the ground parking floor. I heard from other residents that apartments on top floors are leaking. This building feels rushed. It's better than a empty lot, but I would like more buildings to be built next to it, so it would remove the emphasis from One Water.
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  #11496  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 5:06 PM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
I guess it's not to the sidewalk like we see in Center City proper. But it's pretty good and certainly not a "disaster". The building is still oriented to the sidewalk and has a retail space. Definitely better than the long blank wall at the Hyatt or the enormous setbacks that define Waterfront Square and Sugar House.

Measured against these buildings - or the big box shopping centers - and it's clear that One Water Street is so much better in the way in meets the street. Perfect? No. But again, it's a step in the right direction.
If you walk down Delaware Avenue nearly the entire ground floor length of the building is a parking garage behind about dozen feet of landscaping. There is not a single door that is even within 20 feet of the sidewalk on Delaware, Vine or Summer street. If there actually are retail spaces I have no idea where they would even be located.

This project is not a disaster. But in terms of meeting the sidewalk it is an utter failure. As I said, I don't view that as a deal breaker at this location, but it is what it is, this building is no where near meeting the sidewalk in any imaginable way.
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  #11497  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 7:25 PM
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I thought it was designed as such due to being in a flood plain - needs to be built above the street elevation on Delaware Ave, no?
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  #11498  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 7:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanthusiat View Post
Durst to buy another site along the Delaware River



More: https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel..._news_headline
Do we have any reason to believe that this couldn't potentially be a highrise? Does anyone know the height limit on this parcel?
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  #11499  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 7:41 PM
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Check out the press release for the latest Durst purchase. They're working with Handel Architects on the project. Fingers crossed...

Last edited by Leviathant; Jan 22, 2019 at 9:04 PM.
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  #11500  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 7:53 PM
City Wide City Wide is offline
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Pie in the sky? Who is the Provident Building redevelopment team? Please remember that this is a City owned property in Janie Blackwell's district, so unless Penn gets involved (and why would they) she will most likely stop anything good happening there. Unless it has her name mounted on top of it.
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