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  #1041  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2015, 10:29 PM
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Market wise there is no comparison between NYC and Dubai. Even if the labor costs where the same as Dubai, land costs are astronomical, and the logistics of things are complex. A 20 floor high rise here, even if labor was the same would cost much much more.

But anyways, a tower such as this, even with its uber price tag and high unit price is more eye candy for the city. So while its mostly inaccessible unless you're part of the 1/100 of 1% (Not even 1%), the city is huge and there are plenty of opportunities for everyone else to share the benefits of many other developments.

People often complain about towers with a small quantity of units and big height, but think of it again, as eye candy in terms of the skyline and how it incorporates into the urban fabric.
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  #1042  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2015, 10:30 PM
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Folks, c'mon. This is why the Nordstrom thread was locked.
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  #1043  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2015, 11:01 PM
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i peeked in today - lots of banging and clanging around in there!

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  #1044  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2015, 2:53 PM
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Brewer wades into union’s fight with luxury developer

Ryan Hutchins
Mar. 24, 2015

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Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is jumping into a dispute between New York City’s powerful construction union and a major developer who faces accusation of running dangerous job sites.

The battle between the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York and JDS Development, which is planning one of the tallest skyscrapers in New York, is fundamentally about the company’s use of non-union labor on that and other high-profile projects.

But the trade council has not focused specifically on that issue, instead running a campaign to attack JDS on its safety record. President Gary LaBarbera said the company hires “irresponsible subcontractors,” that workers haven’t had apprenticeships and that they’ve had “no safety training.”

That’s where Brewer carefully inserts herself, writing in a letter to JDS’ Michael Stern that she has “concerns” about safety issues and implying the company does not treat its employees well.

“As a developer, you have a legal as well as ethical obligation to comply with safety rules, and to employ contractors and sub-contractors that adequately train, protect and compensate their workers,” Brewer wrote in the Feb. 20 letter, which was obtained by Capital this week. “All workers should have fair wages and benefits, be informed of their rights, and be protected from injury.”

Brewer refers to “serious accidents at your construction sites” and mentions issues surrounding scaffolding with no rails, workers without “appropriate” safety harnesses and alleges a failure of protect people and property near construction sites. She says such problems can “put lives in jeopardy.”

JDS, through a publicist, declined to comment on the letter. But the publicist said “much” of what Brewer refers to are not actual Department of Buildings violations but rather complaints.

In January, Pubic Advocate Letitia James sent a similar letter to JDS about safety issues. Like Brewer, James is a friend to unions and has received political support from organized labor.

JDS, while not a household name, is a big time developer planning to build a super-skinny 80-story-tall tower at 111 W. 57th St., along the so-called “Billionaires’ Row.” The tower would reach more than 1,400 feet, surpassing One57 and the already-skyline-dominating 432 Park. It would become the tallest building ever built without union labor .

The developer is also behind another big non-union project called the Walker Towers, located at 212 W. 18th Street. The site is several blocks from an unrelated construction site where a woman walking down the sidewalk was killed last week when a flying piece of plywood struck her.
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  #1045  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2015, 6:12 PM
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Gale Brewer will use anything to stop developers from pushing skyward. I find it funny that she is siding with the union to stop this project, when months ago she was trying to stop a project they were working on.
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  #1046  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2015, 7:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Design-mind View Post
Gale Brewer will use anything to stop developers from pushing skyward. I find it funny that she is siding with the union to stop this project, when months ago she was trying to stop a project they were working on.
What a dumb biatch that one is... can't wait for it to go skyward and rub it in her face.

She also looks like jabba the hutt
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  #1047  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 12:30 AM
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I'm not sure the issue of union or non-union labor is an issue the borough president should be weighing in on, but Brewer knows no bounds. She'd stop the tower from being built outright if she could.
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  #1048  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 1:31 AM
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She'd stop the tower from being built outright if she could.
But she can't right?
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  #1049  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 1:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Zapatan View Post
But she can't right?
She can delay them if anything, but she won't stop it. This is too far in the process. Seems more like a bs issue on labor conditions for a project that hasn't really started fully yet. If 10 people die building this, then that will be a problem, but hypothetical scenarios of something going wrong on this project due to past incidents is a weak argument for stopping this project.

Code and city violations occur to developers all the time, but it hardly bars them from building future towers.

What can she do to stop this project? She can write letters, and show her self as a representative of Tatooine during her press releases, but she's more of a fly to the developers. They eventually get swatted away.

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What a dumb biatch that one is... can't wait for it to go skyward and rub it in her face.

She also looks like jabba the hutt


About right...
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  #1050  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 2:31 AM
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he can write letters, and show her self as a representative of Tatooine during her press releases, but she's more of a fly to the developers. They eventually get swatted away.
A very large, obese and extra annoying fly... but in any case, good
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  #1051  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 11:37 AM
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Manhattan’s Stalagmite Architecture
Space constraints and structural technologies produce precarious-looking high-rises



ANTHONY PALETTA
March 25, 2015

Quote:
Manhattan’s skyline is making yet another historical surge upward, though this time with a new crop of super-tall, strikingly narrow apartment buildings that in some cases seem to defy gravity.

To see for yourself, walk by SHoP Architects’ 111 W. 57 St., Christian de Portzamparc’s One57, Jean Nouvel’s 53 W. 53rd St. or Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park Ave.

What’s arresting about these structures is their eccentric dimensions. SHoP’s 111 W. 57th St., for example, will boast a width-to-height ratio of 1-to-23. (A standard No. 2 pencil has about a 1-to-30 ratio, and the original World Trade Center towers were a gouty 1-to-7.) Some of these new structures, especially on the upper reaches, are only one unit per floor.

It’s partly technology that explains these stalagmite structures. Architects and engineers have tailored improvements in steel and reinforced concrete that facilitate developers’ perennial search for height on an island notoriously short of real estate. What we are witnessing, says SHoP Architects founding partner Gregg Pasquarelli, is a “wonderful golden age of the tall, slender building.”

These innovations mark just the latest chapter in the evolving history of the skyscraper. Over the past century, technological breakthroughs have enabled builders to steadily reduce the proportion of structural elements—mainly steel and concrete—in the area where we live, work and play, savings usually given over to glass.

One result is buildings that look downright precarious, despite their tremendous strength. For example, the residential tower that Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates has designed for 45 E. 22nd St., now under construction, is 75 feet across at its base but 125 feet at its top.

Until the late 19th century, buildings were largely supported by their masonry walls, and, with time, by iron frames that could rise only to about 10 stories.

Then came steel. Skyscrapers like the Flatiron Building were able to soar so high because they were held up by frames of steel girders anchored in bedrock.

In the 1930s, advances in glass fabrication liberated buildings from exterior masonry and produced the glass-curtain wall, conceived by Mies van der Rohe in 1922 and realized here in his Seagram Building and in Gordon Bunshaft’s Lever House.

But residential developers remained a long way from the Holy Grail: exteriors made mostly of glass, which flood interiors with light, provide spectacular views and maximize usable floor space.

The modern curtain walls of the 1950s still required thick exterior columns for support. That’s not much of a problem in commercial buildings, but a large exterior column in a living room window is about as welcome as a vagrant.

Over the past three decades, structural engineers have come up with a wide range of innovations in materials and design—mainly in the realm of reinforced concrete—that enable developers to reduce the size of exterior columns and in some cases put more of what holds up a building in its core.

Leo Argiris, a principal at the engineering, design and planning firm Arup, says “there was no eureka moment” in the evolution of reinforced concrete, but rather a series of steps ensuring that each material involved was of the highest quality and that they were mixed and poured on a precise schedule.

Such steps have doubled the strength of reinforced concrete since the 1980s, according to Ahmad Rahimian, U.S. director of building structures for WSP, which is erecting One57.

Steel is a widespread and easy frame system for commercial buildings; the intense strength of reinforced concrete, which can be wielded in narrow columns, is typically preferred for these residential buildings, freeing more exterior space for views.

What’s the next pinnacle in the sky? We’re certainly capable of building even taller, narrower residential buildings, but the prime constraint, at a certain point, is how much living space would remain at the top. Some portion of the structure is inevitably devoted to elevators and the core. If a building narrows at all, as most do, the remaining floorspace dwindles to a size that could hardly be called luxurious.

Another important constraint is how to transport residents to the top floors—432 Park Ave. is 96 stories. The elaborate elevator banks of commercial buildings simply occupy too much space, and fewer elevators would entail longer delays reaching upper floors.

If residents haven’t grown old working to afford one of these pricey units, they just might waiting for the elevator.
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  #1052  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 5:15 PM
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To see for yourself, walk by SHoP Architects’ 111 W. 57 St., Christian de Portzamparc’s One57, Jean Nouvel’s 53 W. 53rd St. or Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park Ave
Someone clearly hasn't ACTUALLY tried to walk by these, since 2/4 aren't out of the ground.
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  #1053  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:18 PM
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Outrage over JDS’ nonunion plans hits multifamily conference
Union workers rally at Bisnow summit to protest 111 West 57th St.

March 26, 2015
Mark Maurer

Quote:
The fight between Michael Stern’s JDS Development Group and a prominent construction trade group spread to a real estate conference Thursday morning, as protesters rallied outside and, in one instance, shouted from the audience.

Moments before the end of Bisnow’s sixth annual NYC Multifamily Summit, developer Ian Bruce Eichner said in his final thoughts that he likes “what Michael Stern is doing,” referring to the proposed supertall condominium tower at 111 West 57th Street that JDS is developing along with Kevin Maloney’s Property Markets Group. Eichner said he wanted to to figure out how to do more projects with nonunion labor.”

Eichner’s comment was met with resounding boos by some members of the audience, and Santos Rodriguez, director of community affairs for the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York, shouted “Wrong!” Rodriguez reiterated the trade association’s recent criticisms over the developers’ push to build the tower sans any use of union workers, arguing that the workers need to support their families.

Stern, also on the panel, responded that the biggest threat to development projects right now is uncertainty over 421a tax abatements.

In protest, union workers outside the New World Stages theater had set up the now-notorious giant inflatable rat and held up a banner that said, “While Michael Stern is addressing his audience, what’s happening at his construction site?”

The conference featured three panels with mortgage brokers, investment sales brokers and developers. Other notable panelists included Scott Alper from Witkoff, the Lightstone Group’s Mitchell Hochberg, Town Residential’s Anna Zarro, Meridian Capital Group’s Ronnie Levine and TerraCRG’s Adam Hess.

The panelists discussed the wave of foreign investment in the city, emerging neighborhoods and the risks facing the multifamily market.

Hochberg said his firm has played it very safe and acquired very few buildings in recent years. Buying at the right basis and with low leverage is key, he said.

“We’re in the fifth or sixth inning of a nine-inning game,” Hochberg said, referring to the state of the overall New York City real estate market. Lightstone’s current projects include a 700-unit Gowanus apartment building and four Moxy hotels with Marriott.

Discussing the influx of Chinese capital, Eichner said it can’t compare to the boom of Japanese construction companies in the city in the 1980s.

“I can’t picture the Chinese getting their arms around a five-year project in Gowanus because they would need to accept all the uncertainty with the zoning risks,” Eichner said. In Fact, Chinese firms such as the Greenland Group have shown a willingness to enter ground-up development ventures, including Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park.

Eichner pointed to rising construction costs, the need for workforce affordable housing – not for low-income tenants – and the impact of the U.S. dollar on luxury residential deals as key issues plaguing the market. He also said that there are too many choices for buyers of apartments at boutique projects in the West Village, Chelsea and Soho — projects with no views and few amenities.

“If you look at data from Douglas Elliman, Corcoran Sunshine or an upside-down banana, there’s virtually no sales in these apartments in the last six months,” Eichner said.

There is not much of an inventory crunch in this part of the market, Stern said.

Yosef Katz, managing director at GFI Realty Services, said the multifamily market in Bushwick and Bedford-Stuyvesant is “kind of done.”

Michael Tortorici, vice president at Ariel Property Advisors, jokingly asked Katz if he mistakenly meant Williamsburg.

“The sales volume is just too high,” Katz said. “We’ll get to the stats later. … Cap-rate guys are few and far between – they’re priced out.”

Weighing in on the changing Brooklyn climate, Hochberg said he was recently at a bar in Gowanus with his colleagues in suits when a group of young people approached them.

“They called us bridge-and-tunnel people,” Hochberg said.

From left: Michael Stern, Ian Bruce Eichner, Scott Alper and banner outside New World Stages (credit: Mark Maurer)
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  #1054  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:22 PM
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In protest, union workers outside the New World Stages theater had set up the now-notorious giant inflatable rat and held up a banner that said, “While Michael Stern is addressing his audience, what’s happening at his construction site?”

Well, of course the giant rat would make an appearance. Meanwhile, his minions are threatening to overrun the city.
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  #1055  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2015, 3:30 PM
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Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
Well, of course the giant rat would make an appearance.
The inflatable rat is epic! It'll simply make this tower appear more beautiful as it begins its journey skyward.

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  #1056  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2015, 7:27 PM
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Snapped a quick picture above the fence - sorry for cell phone quality:

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  #1057  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2015, 1:11 AM
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Now calling Gale Brewer a rat is an insult to those N.Y.C. Subway Mice. I did kiss them over her. Let's just call her that ugly troll that lives underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.
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  #1058  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2015, 5:00 AM
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Now calling Gale Brewer a rat is an insult to those N.Y.C. Subway Mice. I did kiss them over her. Let's just call her that ugly troll that lives underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.
Ha! Seriously, those poor rats being compared to that unfortunate looking, dimwitted woman.
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  #1059  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2015, 1:30 PM
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Apparently there's a promo ad in the NYT Mag (thanks to RW):



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  #1060  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2015, 3:53 PM
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RW should be unbanned. He's an amazing guy and forumer. The eyes and ears of nyc people. If you want photo updates on the street of sites that are rarely covered, he's there.
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