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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2020, 8:44 AM
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Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
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Originally Posted by liat91 View Post
What’s the use of building up downtown so much, if you take away shopping and movies?
Much of the retail space in all cities is being absorbed by the sort of place that can't be duplicated online: Restaurants, recreational facilities and so on. So the point of downtown is becoming not so much shopping for THINGS as a place to spend one's free time and a place to WORK. In a way, this takes us back to ancient times when the center of ancient cities wasn't so much about buying and selling as about congregating for public spectacles, political events, religious worship, sporting/entertainment events and so on. Not much was bought and sold in the Roman forum, the baths, the Coloseum or Circus Maximus or the various temples and public buildings of the city center.
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  #42  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2020, 10:09 AM
Encolpius Encolpius is offline
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^ Difference being, of course, that those spectacles and festivals in the ancient city were generally free and open to all, and therefore attended by all (and there was indeed plenty bought and sold in those places -- remember how Jesus had to throw the money-changers out of the temple?). Whereas the corporate offices, hotels, bars, restaurants, clubs, theaters, gyms, concert halls and sports arenas of modern cities are private spaces serving an increasingly elite clientele. At least shopping malls were semi-public places where, for instance, one could loiter as a teenager so long as you weren't objectionable to the rent-a-cops.
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  #43  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2020, 8:30 PM
liat91 liat91 is offline
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Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
^ Difference being, of course, that those spectacles and festivals in the ancient city were generally free and open to all, and therefore attended by all (and there was indeed plenty bought and sold in those places -- remember how Jesus had to throw the money-changers out of the temple?). Whereas the corporate offices, hotels, bars, restaurants, clubs, theaters, gyms, concert halls and sports arenas of modern cities are private spaces serving an increasingly elite clientele. At least shopping malls were semi-public places where, for instance, one could loiter as a teenager so long as you weren't objectionable to the rent-a-cops.
Tend to agree. Our center cities will be for elites and specifically for elites that live in city centers. Not a good thing imo.

I gotta think though, city dwellers with money will want multiple high end boutiques and expensive cinema grills at the least.
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  #44  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2020, 8:39 PM
ssiguy ssiguy is online now
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Yes, many malls are dying but I think the reason for this has not really been discussed. It's not like people today love dying of heat exposure, getting soaked in the rain, or freezing to death more than they did 30 or 40 years ago which was always the big draw to the mall...……….it allowed you to shop in a comfortable, climate controlled environment.

Much of the decline of malls has little to do with the malls themselves and everything to do with demographics. These malls were built to serve their communities and the shopping demographic near them. Now those 1970/80s suburbs have gone from Mom & Dad and 3 or 4 kids to suburb of retirees and the new families only have 1 kid. Malls thrive on discretionary spending power which the young parents and their kids once offered but now those discretionary shoppers are gone. This is why many malls are dead EXCEPT for the grocery store and pharmacy because no matter what your age, you always need those 2 basics.

The big box stores on the outer suburbs are simply doing what the malls did...……...following their shoppers. The thing that will give the big box outlets and "power centres" more longevity is that they are MUCH cheaper to build and have MUCH lower maintenance costs resulting in generally lower prices for their leases and hence for consumers.

It's not that the idea of shopping in a mall has become unappealing but rather that the shoppers that led to their rise have disappeared.
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