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Old Posted May 13, 2015, 2:02 AM
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Afghan War Memorial & Victoria Cross Memorial [Richmond Landing]

Memorials to Afghan war, Victoria Cross winners to be added to Richmond's Landing

Blair Crawford, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: May 12, 2015, Last Updated: May 12, 2015 6:02 PM EDT


Two new military memorials will be added to the capital in time for the celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday in 2017.

The National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan and the National Victoria Cross Memorial will be placed on Richmond’s Landing, on the south shore of the Ottawa River downstream from Chaudière Falls. A design competition for each memorial will begin shortly, the government said.

The announcement was made Tuesday morning by Veterans Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole.

More than 40,000 Canadian troops served in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2014. The mission cost 158 Canadian lives, and more than 2,000 others were wounded or injured. The memorial will pay tribute to Canadians — both military and civilian — who served in combat and in the rebuilding of the country.

The Victoria Cross is Canada’s highest honour for valour in combat. That memorial will include the names of all 99 Canadian Victoria Cross winners — 38 of them were awarded posthumously — since the honour was established by Queen Victoria in 1856.

“The National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan and the National Victoria Cross Memorial will honour the Canadians who have served our country with pride and valour,” O’Toole said in a statement. “They will also act as enduring reminders of our duty, as Canadians, to remember and reflect, with pride and compassion, on the efforts and sacrifices made by all those touched by war and conflict.”

The memorials will become part of the 2.8-kilometre Memorial Route that begins at Cartier Square Drill Hall and passes the National War Memorial on Elgin Street, Parliament Hill and the Canadian War Museum on LeBreton Flats.

Richmond Landing is already home to the Royal Canadian Navy Monument and has a panoramic view of the Ottawa River and Parliament Hill.

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http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...chmond-landing
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  #2  
Old Posted May 13, 2015, 2:05 AM
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Richmond Landing to be site of 2 new military memorials
Veterans Affairs announces new memorial route in downtown Ottawa to include 2 new military memorials

CBC News Posted: May 12, 2015 2:02 PM ET Last Updated: May 12, 2015 3:54 PM ET



Two new national memorials honouring members of the Canadian military will be built at Richmond Landing as part of a larger new memorial route through downtown Ottawa, Veterans Affairs announced Tuesday.

The site along the Ottawa River south of Victoria Island will be home to the National Memorial to Canada's Mission in Afghanistan and the National Victoria Cross Memorial. It is already the site of the Royal Canadian Navy Monument.

The new memorials, along with a 2.8-kilometre memorial route that will link Ottawa landmarks with military significance, are expected to be unveiled in 2017 for Canada's 150th anniversary of Confederation.


Richmond Landing, already home to the Royal Canadian Navy Monument, will be the site of two new military memorials, Veterans Affairs announced.

The route is expected to begin at Cartier Square Drill Hall along the Rideau Canal near Ottawa's City Hall, continue to the National War Memorial and the Parliament Buildings, and end at the Canadian War Museum.

The memorial to the mission in Afghanistan was announced last May ahead of the National Day of Honour, a one-time event to honour the 40,000 Canadian Armed Forces personnel who fought and the 158 who died in Afghanistan.

The new permanent memorial at Richmond Landing is separate from the travelling Afghanistan Memorial Vigil, which contains plaques originally displayed at the cenotaph at the Kandahar Air Field, said Martin Magnan, Veterans of Affairs press secretary.

The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces has not yet announced a permanent home for the vigil.

The new Victoria Cross Memorial will list the names of the 99 Canadians who earned the country's highest award for valour.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...ials-1.3071071
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  #3  
Old Posted May 13, 2015, 2:05 AM
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I hope he leaves room for the nuclear missile silos on Lebreton flats....
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  #4  
Old Posted May 13, 2015, 2:53 AM
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Apparently, you can never have too many war memorials. Maybe we should add another dozen or so just here and there for good measure.
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Old Posted May 13, 2015, 5:07 AM
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ENOUGH!!!!!

We are one step away from having a Monument Festival. Or a festival monument.
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Old Posted May 13, 2015, 5:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aylmer View Post
Apparently, you can never have too many war memorials. Maybe we should add another dozen or so just here and there for good measure.
"We" are adding hundreds of them across the country.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/cana...ment-1.3040982
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  #7  
Old Posted May 13, 2015, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uhuniau View Post
"A federally sponsored program to create 250 war memorials in communities across Canada honouring the sacrifices of Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan needs the permission of the United States government to proceed."

"Canada Company says communities must pay the costs of transporting the memorials from London, Ont., securing a site and installation, which the group says could cost between $5,000 and $20,000."

"The Canada Company, a charity established to help veterans, is spearheading the project and has invited communities across the country to apply for monuments. The hulls and turrets are to be welded back together, and the shell vehicle mounted in a standard configuration, drawing on student welders from Fanshawe College."

So, with an average cost of 12,500$ per site, do you think that $3 million could be better spent, I don't know, helping veterans deal with trauma, PTSD, and injury?
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  #8  
Old Posted May 13, 2015, 11:29 AM
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Ooh, how about a monument to the victims of Veterans Affairs cuts and budget misallocations?
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Old Posted May 13, 2015, 1:10 PM
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Originally Posted by silvergate View Post
So, with an average cost of 12,500$ per site, do you think that $3 million could be better spent, I don't know, helping veterans deal with trauma, PTSD, and injury?
Well, if you knew what Canada Company can and cannot do funding wise, youd realize that they cannot actually take over the duty of Veterans Affairs who 'covers' the cost of trauma, PTSD and Injury. They do however offer bursuries to families of vets, they offer funds to retro fit houses above what is offered by VA and offer support to various regiments for christmas dinners and such.

I think that creating memorials to go, presumably in locations where regiments recieved 'Afghanistan' battle honours, is a good gesture and well within the pervue of Canada Company. I do think they should also pick up the tab for the transportation of the memorials.

I think that all of the aforementioned memorials have much greater significance to Canada than the Communisim monument or the Holocaust Memorial (as presented) and given the location in proximity to an existing monument it is less than invasive, but still fitting.

However my opinions could be biased due to my current service and knowing members who have fallen in Afghanistan.
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Old Posted May 13, 2015, 1:52 PM
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I don't mind this. Depending on how the memorial looks, it could compliment the area quite nicely.

Now if they would just cancel that terrible victims of communism memorial.
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  #11  
Old Posted May 18, 2015, 2:40 AM
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Envy and the communist pile: Afghan monument tucked below bridge

Kelly Egan, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: May 15, 2015, Last Updated: May 15, 2015 7:19 AM EDT


Help a simple man with this:

The victims of communism get a huge, glorious spot on Wellington Street — for the whole world to see — and those who served or died in Afghanistan get a spot below the Portage Bridge for cyclists to wave at.

Don’t get it. At all.

On Tuesday, Veterans Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole announced two new military memorials to be installed at Richmond Landing, not far from the Royal Canadian Navy Monument, which is so grand, and in a location so prominent, I’d never heard of it.

It is, in fact, in a lovely spot: a peninsula in the Ottawa River that sticks out eastward from the Portage Bridge and the Mill St. Brew Pub, which is how you drive in from the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway, until a foot path takes over.

But the site is off the main bicycle and walking path behind Parliament Hill and the locals tell me it is snowed in during the winter. Nice. I suppose we can just grieve seasonally, or pay homage in snowshoes.

The minister announced plans for two memorials — and honestly, has this government become drunk on these things? — the National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan and the National Victoria Cross Memorial, both to be installed just west of the Navy monument.

(To close the loop on the Navy monument: there it was, all that lovely white marble, with black graffiti scrawled on two sides Thursday, only to have the NCC respond by putting a “Work in Progress” sign on the monument itself. With duct tape. Yes. They duct-taped a sign on the Royal Canadian Navy Monument, below hallowed words like Normandy. Sorry, this is just inexcusably tacky.)

On the Afghan mission, who knew, literally?

We checked with several veterans’ groups and none said they were consulted about this spot as an appropriate location to honour the 158 Canadian Forces members killed and the 40,000 who served during the 12-year mission.

The Royal Canadian Legion said it didn’t know a thing about it, except that Dow’s Lake was once a candidate.

Bruce Moncur, president of the year-old Afghanistan Veterans Association of Canada, said his group was not contacted. He’s not entirely sold on the site, because it appears to be tucked away.

“I believe accessibility is everything,” he said this week. “If it is too far off the beaten track, pretty soon you can see the dandelions creeping in and skateboarders doing tricks off it, and the jogger running by and not looking at it twice. It might be like the war itself, another forgotten war.”

He said he hoped the government would seek input from Afghan veterans in coming up with a design, which he thinks should personally honour all 158 of the fallen.

“We want to be consulted about what it should be, the final product. We don’t want some art student to do something that wouldn’t commemorate the sacrifices made by so many.”

Moncur said he thought an empty piece of land across from the National War Museum would be an ideal location but, alas in these memorial-mad times, it is being reserved for the National Holocaust Monument.

He also said any Afghanistan memorial needs room to breathe so that on special occasions, like the unveiling or anniversaries, the families of the wounded and deceased, their fellow service personnel, dignitaries and media can gather in respectful comfort. (It is unclear whether the chosen spot can accommodate much of a crowd.)

Michael Blais is the president and founder of Canadian Veterans Advocacy and well-known for challenging the government line on veteran affairs.

“They certainly did not,” he said, when asked if his group had been consulted. “I don’t think they consulted with anybody.”

Blais believes the memorial should be closer to Parliament Hill, in the general orbit of the other war memorials, be it the national one or the War of 1812.

A spokesman for Veteran Affairs said the monument will be placed on the Landing’s upper plaza, measuring about 800 square metres (versus 5,000 for Victims of Communism). The site was pinpointed after a selection process run by the NCC, the department said. It also added that a “visioning workshop” in the fall of 2014 had input from Afghanistan veterans still in the forces.

Well, it may not be a terrible spot. Simply the wrong one. And the feds don’t so much persuade as invite suspicion: monument building, after all, says much about the gods we worship.

To contact Kelly Egan, please call 613-726-5896 or email kegan@ottawacitizen.com.
twitter.com/kellyegancolumn

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...d-below-bridge
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  #12  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2015, 12:56 AM
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Memorial to Canada's mission in Afghanistan behind schedule

Don Butler, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: December 3, 2015 | Last Updated: December 3, 2015 7:21 PM EST


A new military memorial in Ottawa to Canada’s mission in Afghanistan is behind schedule, raising doubts about whether it will be completed as planned for Canada’s sesquicentennial in 2017.

The ministerial briefing book for Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly describes the memorial as “a high profile commemoration” and says the department plans to launch a national design competition in the fall of 2015.

But Canadian Heritage, which is managing the project on behalf of Veterans Affairs Canada, confirmed this week that no design competition has yet been announced. The department was tight-lipped about the project’s timetable, saying only that further details will be provided “in due course.”

Veteran’s Affairs, the project lead, was similarly vague, saying more information about the memorial and other commemorative initiatives “will be available in the coming months.”



Plans for the memorial were first announced in May 2014 by Julian Fantino, then minister of veterans affairs. They were re-announced a year later by his successor, Erin O’Toole, along with plans for a new memorial to Canadian winners of the Victoria Cross.

Beyond the fact that it will be placed at Richmond Landing, on the banks of the Ottawa River just east of the Portage Bridge, very little information about the planned memorial has been revealed publicly.

However, a staff report submitted to an in-camera meeting of the National Capital Commission‘s board of directors last January — released to the Citizen by the NCC this week — contains heretofore secret details about the project, most notably its total budget of up to $5 million.

That puts the memorial’s cost in the same range as that of the controversial Memorial to the Victims of Communism, though its 800-square-metre site is one-sixth the size of the Wellington Street location selected by the previous Conservative government for the victims of communism memorial.

According to a timetable in the NCC report, the first phase of the design competition for the memorial was to have taken place last spring, with the second phase this fall, selection of a winning design next spring and an unveiling in 2017.

The NCC report describes the memorial as an “Order 2” commemoration, NCC-speak for sites along Confederation Boulevard that commemorate people, events and ideas of national symbolic importance.

“The memorial is intended to provide a place of pilgrimage and reflection, to encourage public appreciation and understanding of the significance of Canada’s mission in Afghanistan, and to allow public activities such as remembrance events,” the report says.

The NCC document also reveals that the Crown corporation’s board considered granting federal land use approval for two different sites for the memorial during its in-camera meeting last January.

In addition to the selected site at Richmond Landing, the staff report also recommended an alternate location: a 1,100-square-metre triangle of land at the western entrance to the Mackenzie King Bridge, surrounded by Elgin, Albert and Slater streets.

NCC staff said the “Mackenzie King Bridge Triangle” site’s elevated position and location would enhance the new memorial’s visibility. The site also has “strong thematic links” to the National War Memorial and several military-themed commemorations in Confederation Park, the submission says.

But the board approved only the Richmond Landing site and deferred consideration of the Mackenzie King bridge site until more information was provided. The issue became moot when Veterans Affairs accepted the Richmond Landing location.

While the bridge site is listed in the NCC’s inventory of potential commemorative sites, the chosen site at Richmond Landing is not, the staff submission says. “However, it features several characteristics which make it appropriate for such a use.”

Among other things, it’s close to the Royal Canadian Navy Monument and features views to the Peace Tower, the report says. The NCC owns it and adjacent green space could provide room for occasional large gatherings.

The biggest negative is that the site is believed to be contaminated, it says, adding that the project budget will need to include a contingency for an environment site assessment and soil and groundwater management plans.

dbutler@ottawacitizen.com
twitter.com/ButlerDon

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...in-afghanistan
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  #13  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2016, 1:08 PM
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Afghan war memorial in limbo as Liberals roll back perceived Tory militarism

Lee Berthiaume, Ottawa Citizen 03.03.2016


OTTAWA — The Trudeau government is considering whether to shelve plans for a national Afghanistan war memorial, as it rolls back the previous Conservative government’s attempts to imbue Canada’s national identity with a healthy dose of militarism.

Then-veterans affairs minister Julian Fantino announced the National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan in May 2014. The project, pegged at about $5 million, was intended to honour the 40,000 Canadians who had served in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2014, including 158 who died.

Fantino’s successor, Erin O’Toole, re-announced the project — along with a separate memorial for Canadians who had won the Victoria Cross, the British Commonwealth’s highest military honour — last year. A site for the two memorials was chosen halfway between the Parliament Buildings and the Canadian War Museum.

The memorials were part of a concerted effort by the Conservatives over the previous decade to highlight Canada’s military heritage, traditions and prowess. The Tories spent millions of dollars commemorating various battles and campaigns, and touting Canada’s proud military history.

The focus on Canada’s martial spirit coincided with military missions in Afghanistan, Libya and Iraq. But some also saw it as an attempt to redefine Canada’s national identity after previous governments, particularly the Liberals, had long described Canada as a country of peacekeepers.

But now the two memorials are in limbo, while a Conservative-era program that helped communities build their own memorials or cenotaphs is being cancelled.

In November, departmental officials told new Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr that the two memorials and the Community War Memorial Program were among a number of “key issues” that needed to be addressed by the new Liberal government.

Specifically, the minister was advised to “Seek confirmation whether the following projects (the Afghan and Victoria Cross memorials) are to be continued.” Officials also noted that funding for the community program was set to expire at the end of March unless the Liberals intervened.

Officials also told Hehr the department would need more money to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the First World War battles of the Somme and Beaumont-Hamel this year, and Vimy Ridge next year.

The Ottawa Citizen obtained the briefing notes through the access to information law.

Four months later, Hehr’s office says the new government still has not decided whether to proceed with the memorials. “These are important initiatives and details are still being discussed internally,” spokesman Christian Duval said in an email. “As a result, final decisions have not yet been taken.”

But Hehr’s office did confirm the government is pulling the plug on the $5-million Community War Memorial Program, even though internal Veterans Affairs Canada evaluators gave it glowing reviews last year and said there was a “continued need” for it.

Hehr’s office said the Liberals are committed to marking Canada’s military history. “The Government of Canada is committed to keep alive the achievements and sacrifices of those who served Canada in times of war, military conflict and peace,” spokeswoman Sarah McMaster said in an email.

But the decision to cancel the Community War Memorial Program is the latest indication the Liberals are shifting away from the heavy emphasis on Canadian military history and tradition championed by the Tories.

Immigration Minister John McCallum recently said some references to Canada’s military history added by the Tories will be removed from the new citizenship guide. The Trudeau government has also scrapped a controversial monument in Nova Scotia designed to honour Canada’s war dead in Europe.

Afghanistan Veterans Association founder Michael Blois has previously complained about the site the Conservatives chose for the Afghan memorial. “But something has to be done,” he said. “The length of the commitment and the level of sacrifice that went on, there needs to be something done on a national level.”

O’Toole, who is now the Conservative public safety critic, said veterans have also approached him to ask about the Afghan memorial. He said the monument is especially important now, as many Afghan vets continue to struggle in their post-military lives.

“That monument should be beyond politics. That was the (military’s) longest mission,” he said. “And I know veterans are looking for it, and there are still a number of young guys trying to find their purpose post-deployment. And they have to know that the country appreciated what they did.”

O’Toole also decried the government’s decision not to renew the community memorial program, which he said had experienced an uptake in interest over the past couple of years.

At least one Ontario community will have to find other funding to pay for a community war memorial now that the program is cancelled.

Paul Thorne, co-chairman of the Huron County Afghanistan Community Memorial Committee, said the planned monument, consisting of a demobilized light-armoured vehicle of the type used by Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan, will cost around $50,000. That doesn’t include the long-term costs of maintenance.

“We thought it was important because we do have Afghan veterans in our community, and some of them are suffering from PTSD,” he said. “And chances are we’re only going to have one monument in our area.”

Thorne said the community had hoped to tap into the community war memorial program. It will still press ahead with the project by increasing its fundraising efforts, but having some support from the federal government “would have been nice and would have been easier.”

He added that Canadian veterans serve all Canadians, and federal assistance “is a matter of honouring a commitment to them.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/na...553/story.html
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Old Posted Sep 12, 2017, 11:58 PM
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Afghanistan war memorial site next to Canadian War Museum stirs controversy

Jon Willing, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: September 12, 2017 | Last Updated: September 12, 2017 4:19 PM EDT




The National Capital Commission is caught in another memorial controversy.

The Canadian War Museum and its architect are resisting a plan to locate the National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan at a site near the building.

NCC management on Tuesday recommended that the board approve the site location just west of the War Museum, but CEO Mark Kristmanson won support to defer the vote, sensing cold feet around the table.

Board member Carol Loughrey, who’s from New Brunswick, was emotional when she explained that she lives next to a military base and that she supports the memorial project.

“It sends a powerful message of our respect for what so many people gave up and suffered,” Loughrey said. “The woman first to die in combat, that’s a very significant thing.”

Loughrey said she hated to vote against something that honours the sacrifices of the military, but she’s convinced by the War Museum’s opposition to the site.

The NCC is in charge of land-use approval.

The War Museum told the NCC the memorial could jeopardize the “architectural vision” originally conceived for the museum. It’s also worried that a monument commemorating one war will lead to other monuments recognizing conflicts.

As it is, the museum tries not to emphasize one conflict over another and it says locating the monument close to the building would make people think the monument is part of the museum.

Museum architect Ray Moriyama, who attended the NCC board meeting, is also opposed to locating the memorial near the building. He believes the museum’s connection with the Ottawa River would be interrupted.

“The placement of the memorial there seems to be the anti-philosophy of the institution itself,” Moriyama said after the meeting. “I feel we have to maintain not only the integrity, but the honesty of what the War Museum is trying to do.”

Veterans Affairs Canada announced the memorial project in May 2014.

The NCC board in January 2015 approved the Richmond Landing upper plaza for the memorial before Veterans Affairs asked for a second review of locations.

There was a shortlist of four locations: the site west of the War Museum; Richmond Landing upper plaza near the Portage Bridge; the lawn of the Canadian Phalanx memorial at Wellington and Lyon streets; and, Cartier Square Drill Hall beside Ottawa City Hall.

A consultation between Veterans Affairs and the Department of National Defence in October 2016 ended with the majority of participants preferring the site west of the War Museum. Last spring, the NCC received a request from Canadian Heritage to approve the War Museum site.

The NCC thinks the museum’s concerns can be mitigated through design, but board members want more analysis before voting.

Board member Kay Stanley said she sides with the War Museum. Only people driving on the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway would see a memorial next to the War Museum, she said.

Stanley said the monument should be at Richmond Landing, “an ideal place.”

After the meeting, Kristmanson said it’s worth reviewing past NCC work on capital military commemorations, considering the difference in opinion on the proposed War Museum site.

“I think sober second thought is a good move in this case,” Kristmanson said.

A design competition is scheduled to begin by the end of 2017 with a winning design selected in September 2018, but Canadian Heritage is still going through consultations.

NCC board approves illumination plan

The board approved a capital illumination plan that has been in the works for several years.

The NCC wants to use strategic lighting to dramatically animate the central area, or in the agency’s words, “enhance the capital’s nocturnal landscape.”

The right lighting, the agency believes, could give the capital more character.

An illumination plan was first proposed in Canada’s Capital Core Area Sector Plan in 2005. Public consultations have been happening since 2014.

With the board’s approval on Tuesday, the NCC will now implement strategic lighting on federal projects and encourage municipalities to consider the illumination plan during their own planning processes.

Priority projects include Richmond Landing, Rideau Hall, Nepean Point, Confederation Park and the Sussex Courtyards.

Kristmanson said the 10-year illumination plan already has a good start with federal projects downtown, such as the Government Conference Centre rehabilitation, giving thought to interesting lighting.

jwilling@postmedia.com
twitter.com/JonathanWilling

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...rs-controversy
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