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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 3:50 PM
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Canadian cities in international media

A thread dedicated to articles, listings, etc. featuring Canadian cities from international medias.

I'm inaugurating the thread with this listing from TimeOut featuring Montreal and Toronto.

The world’s best cities revealed: New York tops the list, followed by Melbourne, Chicago, London and Los Angeles

New York was today revealed as the world’s number one city in the Time Out Index. Its unbeatable combination of excellent food and drink, culture, fun and entertainment earned the Big Apple the coveted top spot as the world’s best city right now, followed by Melbourne, Chicago, London and Los Angeles.

The Time Out Index is based on the experiences and opinions of more than 30,000 people in 48 cities around the world, as well as the views of Time Out’s global network of local editors and city experts. City-dwellers answered survey questions on eating, drinking, culture, nightlife, relationships, community, local neighbourhoods and happiness to rate what it is like living in their city in 2019. Finally, the Time Out team crunched the numbers, combining them with their local expert knowledge to compile the definitive ranking of the world’s best cities right now.

Canadian highlights:

# 6 MONTREAL
A top destination for letting your freak flag fly, Montreal is one of the best cities in the world to just be yourself – and the vast majority of Montrealers are steadfast in their pride for the city’s diversity, dynamism and creativity. Combine its status as a cultural hub full of self-expression with being the second most affordable city on the planet (with the second shortest working hours), and it’s no wonder that 79 percent of locals report feeling happy.

# 23 TORONTO
From first glance, sprawling Toronto may seem like any other concrete jungle whose bustling inhabitants pass without a smile. But don’t be fooled by our stoic façades: we’re happier and friendlier than the global average (despite the awful performance of the TTC public transit system). Visitors willing to take a closer look will find Canada’s biggest city has the world’s fourth most diverse cultural make-up and an ever-evolving culinary scene, which two thirds of Torontonians rate as amazing.
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 3:55 PM
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And, of course, the traditional Mercer Quality of Living survey, which released its new listing this week.

Canadian cities in the world ranking for 2019:

# 3 VANCOUVER
# 16 TORONTO
# 19 OTTAWA
# 21 MONTREAL
# 32 CALGARY

San Francisco, the highest American city, came at # 34.
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 4:05 PM
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New York Times: 52 Places to go in 2019

Canadian highlight:

# 20 CALGARY

Calgary’s new Central Library, from the architectural firm Snohetta, creates not just a design destination, with daily tours, but also a gateway in the form of an arched cedar-clad passageway linking downtown to the city’s evolving East Village, a booming neighborhood where the Bow and Elbow Rivers meet. Calgary was founded in the East Village area in 1875, with a fort built to curb the growing whiskey trade, but the area suffered roughly 70 years of neglect before the Calgary Municipal Land Corporation, formed in 2007, began transforming the area, adding parks, attractions and high-rises. The 240,000-square-foot library, with a performance hall, cafe, children’s play area and outdoor electromagnetic sculptures by Christian Moeller, is next to Studio Bell, home to the National Music Center museum and performance space, and near the just-opened Alt Hotel. Later this year, the multiuse building M2 promises more shops and restaurants beside the Bow River.
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 4:09 PM
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National Geographic: Best trips 2019

Canadian highlight:

# 18 TORONTO

WHY GO NOW: Mix and mingle to the beat

Nearly half of Toronto’s residents are immigrants and more than 200 languages are spoken in Canada’s largest city. A multicultural energy infuses everything from the old-school stylings of Drake to the new HXOUSE emerging artists’ incubator co-founded by singer The Weeknd and his creative director, La Mar Taylor. This creative mix also inspires new restaurants such as Kojin at Momofuku, with its Colombian-inspired, Ontario-sourced dishes sizzling on an Argentine-style grill, and the Toronto Biennial of Art, debuting in 2019. Take a deep dive into the city’s diversity by exploring some of its 140 neighborhoods.

HOW TO GO: Eat, shop, and Instagram your way through Kensington Market and Chinatown on an entertaining Toronto Urban Adventures tour led by a local comedian, artist, actor, or writer guide.
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 4:14 PM
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Wanderlust : The most beautiful harbors in the world

Canadian highlight:

# 8 VANCOUVER

Nature never seems far away from Vancouver’s beautiful harbour. The city is encircled by mountains and Stanley Park, a 1,001 acre haven of indigenous forest and urban spaces, sits in the heart of the city.

The park is almost completely surrounded by water, and the path along the sea wall perimeter is popular with runners and walkers. And who can blame them? The view of the city centre here is stunning, especially in autumn when the mountains and the parks that surround it are ablaze with hues of red, yellow and orange.
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 4:15 PM
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Love this sort of thing.

My favourite isn't specifically in reference to St. John's, but more to Newfoundland generally. One of the many Irish articles about how Irish we are - but this writer gets deeper into the politics and, although she recognizes lots of Irishness in us, clearly thinks it's hilarious that we consider ourselves dramatically different from Canadians.

The Most Irish Island in the World

Quote:
...

So you can’t call them “Newfies”, and you can’t call them Canadians, but they will let you call them Irish – unless their ancestors came from Devon, but those ones are easy to spot because they talk like people from Devon. The Irish talk like they came from Dungarvan. Their accents were preserved by the salt Atlantic air, in tiny isolated communities along the shore. It was a long time before they got roads.

These days, the highway is long and the traffic serene: everyone drives like a lady or like a Canadian. “It looks like Canada to me,” I said to one dissenter and pointed out a hillside of pine trees that was only a Mountie short of a postcard. “That’s not pine,” he said (he seemed a bit shocked). “There’s no pine over there. Those trees are spruce and fir.”

It may all look the same to an outsider, but as you travel through the vast beauty of the landscape, you begin to lose yourself in the fractal variation of one bay or inlet that is crucially different to the inlet or bay before it, and the names you pass are more a story than a map: Random Island, Come by Chance, Witless Bay.
https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-...orld-1.1538579

(My favourite related anecdote of all time was the Irish Times reporter who initially thought people here were mocking his accent )

*****

From the New York Times:

36 Hours in St. John’s, Newfoundland

Quote:
FOUNDED in the late 16th century, St. John’s was already a settlement when New York City was a mere gleam in the eye of European colonizers. Cod was once king here, but now it’s the offshore oil industry that is pumping cash and confidence into this quirky city of nearly 100,000 that sits at North America’s easternmost edge. Icebergs, whales and puffins pass by in summer. And the typical friendliness of Newfoundland and Labrador comes with a decidedly Irish twist — many locals speak with the thickest brogues west of Galway. George Street is the North Atlantic version of Bourbon Street in this attractive city where brightly colored row houses cascade down toward the harbor. With its steep streets, devotion to the arts and stirring views of the harbor and surrounding hills, St. John’s calls to mind a smaller but earthier San Francisco.
https://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/28/t...s/28hours.html

*****

Another fave is all of the American and European coverage of our foodie scene. This one from the United Kingdom is especially complimentary:

North America's most unlikely culinary capital - which you can reach in five hours
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/d...inary-capital/

*****

This one cracks me up every time...

Video Link


And Anthony Bourdain's visit here was great as well.

Lots of coverage of our food in general, probably second only to coverage of Come From Away. This one from the New York Times is good also:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/t...-st-johns.html

*****

National Geographic once ranked us one of the Top 10 Oceanfront Cities in the World.

Quote:
With Irish folk music floating from seafront bars, Newfoundland’s largest city feels more like Dublin. But when icebergs float into the harbor and whales spout offshore, the city struts its own frontier personality.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/t...12_600x450.jpg
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 4:27 PM
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/\ Timely :-)
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 4:27 PM
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South Africans love Trudeau, and seem kinda shocked I am not as enthused. Oh, everyone knows Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. They also think I must speak French.
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Old Posted Mar 16, 2019, 5:47 PM
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"Visitors willing to take a closer look will find Canada’s biggest city has the world’s fourth most diverse cultural make-up and an ever-evolving culinary scene, which two thirds of Torontonians rate as amazing."


Oh dear, Toronto.
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Old Posted Mar 17, 2019, 1:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Mtl View Post
And, of course, the traditional Mercer Quality of Living survey, which released its new listing this week.

Canadian cities in the world ranking for 2019:

# 3 VANCOUVER
# 16 TORONTO
# 19 OTTAWA
# 21 MONTREAL
# 32 CALGARY

San Francisco, the highest American city, came at # 34.
I wonder what accounts for the difference between Ottawa and Calgary in the Mercer survey? I would have thought they'd be very comparable.
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Old Posted Mar 17, 2019, 1:45 AM
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Income inequality, maybe?
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Old Posted Mar 17, 2019, 1:48 AM
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I don't think that's a Mercer criteria, is it? Their survey is directed at ex-pats who are well up the ladder.
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