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  #11201  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2018, 9:04 PM
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  #11202  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2018, 10:18 PM
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We have details

Denver Metro Chamber Will Pitch Ballot Measures to Fund Colorado Transportation
Feb 14, 2018 by David Sachs/Streetsblog Denver
Quote:
A coalition led by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce will file language next week for three ballot measures that would raise money for transportation projects by increasing the state sales tax, Chamber President and CEO Kelly Brough said Tuesday.

The three variations of the proposal each have a different sales tax increment — a half-cent, .62 cents, or a full penny. The measures would raise an estimated $500 million, $620 million, and $1 billion a year, respectively, according to a person familiar with the talks.

Of those funds, 15 percent would be for “multimodal” projects, i.e. transit, biking, and walking, 20 percent would go directly to cities, and another 20 percent would go to counties. The rest would go toward the Colorado Department of Transportation.
Similar to what the legislature came up with last year but couldn't get Republicans in the Senate to go along when they switched horses to borrow $1.9 billion against the State's real estate.

Don't you love how they copied my idea of allocating money to both cities and counties?
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  #11203  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2018, 5:26 PM
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Final numbers are in

DIA sets passenger traffic record in 2017; up 5 percent from 2016
Feb 15, 2018 by Ben Miller - DBJ
Quote:
Airport officials this week announced an official count of 61,379,396 passengers at DIA last year, up 5.3 percent from 2016's previous record of 58,266,515 passengers.
Other notable turnstyle things:
Quote:
Last year, there were a record 2.59 million international travelers, which was a 12.5 percent increase over the previous year's.

Seventy-six of the airport’s top 100 busiest days ever were set in 2017.
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  #11204  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2018, 6:28 PM
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From above:
Quote:
Of those funds, 15 percent would be for “multimodal” projects, i.e. transit, biking, and walking, 20 percent would go directly to cities, and another 20 percent would go to counties. The rest would go toward the Colorado Department of Transportation.
Denver will get to double-dip since 20% goes to cities and 20% goes to counties.

Getting out my mechanical calculator, the city of Denver has about 12.5% (or 1/8) of the states population. Using the middle amount of .62 cents sales tax that is projected to raise $620 million a year. As a city and county, Denver will get 12.5% of 20% twice of the $620 million (or 25% of 40%) or $62 million a year. This assumes a pro rata distribution. Additionally CDOT has responsibility for roads like Federal, Colfax, Colo Blvd and Hampden (off the top of my head) and buses do use roads.

If we assume Denver generates 10% of the state's sales tax revenue; that would mean Denver is contributing $62 million and getting back $62 million so it would be a wash. If Denver batted closer to their weight with a 12% share of sales tax then they would contribute $74.4 million.

Cap Metro - Austin
will release plans for their first light rail, an urban line along a long-favored street/route. It will be 12 miles and cost $2.1 billion. That would be $175 million per mile which for an urban line sounds highly realistic. Nashville estimated theirs closer to $130 million per mile. Austin's plan is conceptual so funding is yet to be considered.
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  #11205  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2018, 8:14 PM
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^ Take Five-remember you can bond from those amounts for a bit more plus those local matches could attract some cash from the Feds..
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  #11206  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2018, 8:49 PM
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I really doubt Denver will be able to double-dip and receive a city share and a county share, considering it is a single entity that performs both city and county functions.
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  #11207  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2018, 10:48 PM
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Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
I know nothing.

But I'm reminded that I later wondered if your parents might live in the vicinity of Grandview HS. Nice area but the transportation options would be rather limited.
I just noticed your post, sorry! Yes they live in the Arapahoe Crossings area. Yeah there isn't much options there unless you drive to nine mile. I think one thing that could help suburbanites to be more open and willing to use public transportation would to make it more convenient. Maybe start by making electronic tickets for your phone/ipad. Another thing that makes me wonder is the speed of our trains. The A-line is awesome. But its kind of disheartening that when its not rush hour, you just hop in your car and drive down the freeway and you can clearly see that your going faster than the trains... I understand that during rush hour its much easier and faster to take the trains into the city, but I have a feeling that many suburbanites don't really think about it, they think being in their car its much more convenient and faster to get to work than to ride the rail, all based upon that one time they saw that they were going faster than the trains.

I fully agree that our focus on public transportation should mainly be in the urban core areas of the city. But I also think we shouldn't forget our suburban neighbors, they can't complain if there is clearly other options of getting into the city without traffic, even though they try. We also have to try and eliminate pollution from suburbs also, even if its a losing battle, at least we are trying to slow down the process. We as a city have to figure out how to cater to everyone, and that's a hard thing to figure out. But I think by making the trains faster than the freeway speeds they follow along with, I think would have a positive impact. Kind of in a placebo affect.

(If that doesn't make any sense I completely understand, I was just kind of rambling on)
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  #11208  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2018, 1:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Denvergotback View Post
(If that doesn't make any sense I completely understand, I was just kind of rambling on)
That is one of the best 'rambles' I've read. Srsly, you have a very good feel for the Big Picture. Man after my own heart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DenverInfill View Post
I really doubt Denver will be able to double-dip and receive a city share and a county share, considering it is a single entity that performs both city and county functions.
Well, I hadn't considered that; is their a precedent for this? Nvm, let's think about this logically.

It would be rational to allocate the city funds along a per capita basis. It would also be logical to allocate county funds based on land area. If they were to do this then they'd presumably have to give Denver both a city and a county share.
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  #11209  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2018, 1:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
Valley Metro CEO Weighs In On How Transit, Transportation Tech Can Live Together
February 21, 2018 By Mark Brodie

I caught a lot of, but not all of, this discussion yesterday morning during the 9:00 hour on KJZZ so I decided to click it up and listen to all of it today. The objective was how will transit needs change or fit in with autonomous vehicles and ride sharing services in the future?

Scott was nice enough to touch all the Spring Training bases that I asked him to... I kid, but it was interesting that he spoke to all the various points of emphasis that I've made. He spoke to first- and last-mile issues, emphasizing high capacity corridors at the expense of local routes and needing a good mix of Express/BRT along with light rail routes. He also made the renewal of Prop 400 where discussion is only about four years off a critical inflexion point for the future. Interestingly, Scott also alluded to the need for dedicated bus lanes in the future w/o being obvious.

You too can listen in.
Since this was an interesting discussion and just as relevant to Denver, generally, I thought some might enjoy listening in. KJZZ is the local NPR station btw even if K-J(A)ZZ were more appropriate call letters in the olden days. Eh, I still listen in at night so it's all good.
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  #11210  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2018, 8:45 AM
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Any good photo tours of Civic Center Station yet?
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  #11211  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2018, 6:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnyderBock View Post
Any good photo tours of Civic Center Station yet?
You bet!

It's official

Proposed sales tax increase could boost funding for transportation projects
February 22, 2018 by John Herrick/Colorado Independent
Quote:
“Our local communities need the resources to improve our streets, transit options, and walking and biking paths. These proposals will make it easier to get around, protect our air quality, and reduce congestion,” said Summit County Commissioner Dan Gibbs, who is part of the group that filed the ballot measures on Thursday.
One new wrinkle over the previously mentioned three proposals is a fourth proposal for a half-cent sales tax Plus $150 million per year from the state's General Fund. This could have (some) political advantages over the others since Republicans have been adamant that funding come from the General Fund... at least that's their political position.

For example a .62 percent increase in sales tax is projected to raise $620 million per year. A .50 percent increase Plus $150 million from the state general fund would raise $650 million per year. This could also be seen as leaving more capacity or room for local (as opposed to state) sales tax increases later on.

I have other questions but I'm waiting for the DBJ and others to explore these proposals over time.
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  #11212  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2018, 12:12 AM
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I'm finally seeing one of your airport trains first hand, Denver!

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  #11213  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2018, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
I'm finally seeing one of your airport trains first hand, Denver!
Not exactly! SEPTA has front/rear passenger windows (cool!) but Denver has luggage racks and bicycle racks (super cool!). Denver omitted trap doors in favor of double sliding doors. The NEC-based equipment design choice will have long term business impacts (bi level cars would have higher capacity per unit and greater potential for integration with intercity/regional trains on mixed use tracks since those often require low platforms.)
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  #11214  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2018, 11:06 PM
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DenverTrans... Thanks for the detail.

Is MOAR better?
No, no it definitely is not

Colorado roads: Business groups offer more funding options
Mar 1, 2018 By Ed Sealover – Reporter, Denver Business Journal
Quote:
Then on Wednesday, a separate group of business organizations — including Colorado Concern, the Colorado Association of Motor Carriers and the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Corp. — told the Denver Business Journal they will ask the Legislature to place on the ballot a hike in what's called the "Specific Ownership Tax," which residents pay each year when they register their vehicles.
Wut are you talking about?
Quote:
The three-part plan would:
  • Boost the fees on all vehicles in the state,
  • Institute a special fee on electric vehicles,
  • And add a new fee on new state residents.
It it would come in conjunction with an annual boost in general-fund spending of around $300 million on transportation.
This is no more than an 'altered state' version of the Republican plan. Dems will never agree to obligating the state's General Fund to $300 million a year.

I know that Colo Springs doesn't like raising the sales tax as they had already raised it locally for local needs. They already pay 8.25 percent.
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  #11215  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2018, 11:29 PM
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Part Two

Colorado roads: Business groups offer more funding options

Interesting article with a smorgasbord of ideas. (Where have you been all these years?)
Quote:
David May, president and CEO of the Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce, said he believes a 5-cent-per-gallon increase in gas tax that is indexed to inflation should be added into the mix of potential funding options.
This has long been a favorite of mine and what most states have been doing, raising fuel taxes. But a nickel a gallon? Forgetaboutit. The top ten highest states now have an average of about 48 cents a gallon while Colorado's is 22 cents a gallon. With one bite at the apple you should raise the gas taxes by a dime increasing to 15 cents or don't bother. The growing state of Washington for example, now has a gas tax of 49.4 cents a gallon

What do the Mayors think?
Quote:
Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan noted that only one statewide tax hike has passed in the 25 years since voters approved the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights — a tax hike on cigarettes in 2004. He said that if officials were able to get voters to back a sales-tax hike for roads this year, they likely wouldn’t get another shot for another two decades.

Therefore, he and other mayors are advocating heavily for a full one-cent tax hike to be placed on the ballot. “I’ve got my most conservative city council member and my most liberal city council member saying, ‘It ought to be a penny or nothing,’” Hogan said.
And the winner should be?
Quote:
Denver Metro Chamber leaders — in conjunction with CCA and regional economic-development organizations — submitted four proposed ballot initiatives on Feb. 22.

One of the four proposals the coalition is considering also would tie the sales-tax to a mandatory general-fund contribution of $150 million a year toward transportation.
Knowing the position of Colo Springs in particular and a lot of Republicans in general, this 'compromise' proposal would likely gain the most widespread support.
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  #11216  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2018, 8:36 PM
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Construction Information
http://www.rtd-fastracks.com/se_69

Quote:
As part of RTD's 2004 voter-approved FasTracks plan to extend rapid transit across the Denver metro region, construction continues for the Southeast Rail Extension project.

Through April 2018
  • Trainstation Circle East at Sky Ridge Avenue is closed for the installation of the track crossing, gates, signals and associated road work. Trainstation Circle West remains open and business/residential access will be maintained.
Upcoming traffic impacts: Friday, March 16 - Monday, March 26
  • Light rail services at Lincoln and County Line stations will be closed. Trains will continue to run north from Dry Creek Station. Riders are encouraged to utilize stations north of County Line Station or seek alternate means of transportation during this closure. Limited bus shuttle service will be available
.

Photo by Anna Stonehouse/The Aspen Times

City of Aspen looks to extend its offering of free rides in town; get cars off the road
Carolyn Sackariason - Aspen Times
Quote:
Four transit companies have bid to provide free rides around the city of Aspen, including the current provider, the Downtowner, whose contract is up in April.

The Florida-based, on-demand transportation company has been contracted with the city since 2016 to take people around town in its fleet of electric golf-cart vehicles. What began as a trial for that summer has turned into almost three years of service. In total, the city has spent more than $540,000 for the Downtowner through January, according to the company's CEO, Stephen Murray
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  #11217  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2018, 10:42 PM
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Quote:
This has long been a favorite of mine and what most states have been doing, raising fuel taxes. But a nickel a gallon? Forgetaboutit. The top ten highest states now have an average of about 48 cents a gallon while Colorado's is 22 cents a gallon. With one bite at the apple you should raise the gas taxes by a dime increasing to 15 cents or don't bother. The growing state of Washington for example, now has a gas tax of 49.4 cents a gallon
Colorado would have a "hella" long ways to go to match California on the gas tax which is right close to Washington state's 49.4 cents a gallon-thanks to Gov Jerry "High-tax" Brown (California's so high that some folks want to repeal it at the polls)..

Last edited by CastleScott; Mar 2, 2018 at 11:34 PM.
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  #11218  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 6:06 PM
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Who wouldathunk?

Colorado Senate Republicans brush aside new business-backed transportation plan
Mar 5, 2018 by By Ed Sealover – Reporter, Denver Business Journal
Quote:
Colorado Senate Republican leaders threw cold water Monday on a new, business-backed transportation-funding plan, saying they now believe there's enough money in the budget for roads this year and next that lawmakers won't have to ask voters for more.
So Republican Senators throw shade on the Business/Republican friendly roads proposal?

Yup, don't want to muddy up our message to the voters. We want a simplistic 'no new taxes' theme that's easy to make and easy for voters to understand, the centerpiece of the November elections for Republicans.
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  #11219  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2018, 11:05 PM
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Oh noes
say it ain't so.

Following the lead of Trump, apparently, my favorite CityLab writer, Laura Bliss is blaming immigrants.

Why Is L.A. Expanding Transit—and Losing Riders?
Trying to address this conundrum, it's a bit of rambling piece referencing various statistics and basic elements based on research done at UCLA which adds to the previous research out of USC.

But let me cut to the chase
It goes more to common sense than anything. Phoenix has a gazillion immigrants with Hispanic being ofc dominant. They make their living primarily in the landscape, hotel and restaurant businesses as well as construction and various building trades. The likelihood that transit would take them to their job sites is mighty slim. It can amaze how most seem to swing car ownership and I'd say typically they are a one and not two (or more) car families. They also carpool.

There's also some discussion of sprawl creating car dependency, yada yada and to an extent if you compare cities that sprawl with the Original Six transit cities that's a legitimate factor but it also misses the point.

One might recall (or not) I've previously suggested that Denver is or is likely become a 'hybrid city' having both areas of density and sprawl. It's not strictly a black/white picture. And to assume that most lower socioeconomic and immigrant residents are transit dependent is a fallacy. If RTD is to bring riders into the city center then it needs to cater to those working downtown and not doing suburban landscape maintenance or house painting. Ofc, that's also where first and last-mile issues come into play.

It's also why Denveright/Denver Transit can make a significant contribution.
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Last edited by TakeFive; Mar 12, 2018 at 11:18 PM.
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  #11220  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2018, 5:43 AM
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Would you like me to Google that for you?
Nope, in fact you've got the wrong door;
It's "Let me Uber that for you"

UCHealth, ride-sharing service form new partnership
By Ed Sealover – Reporter, Denver Business Journal
Quote:
UCHealth is partnering with Uber to make doctor’s visits more accessible — another example of ways that health-care organizations are expanding their scope of care... The Aurora-based health system is offering 30 percent discounts on Uber rides to its Front Range hospitals — including the flagship University of Colorado Hospital — and to most of its outpatient locations for patients, visitors and employees. The discounts are good for as much as five dollars per trip.
Interesting read.

Btw, in Phoenix, Valley Metro is partnering with Lyft.
Lyft to give discounts to riders traveling to, from Phoenix bus stops
Oct. 18, 2017 by Jessica Boehm, The Republic | azcentral.com
Quote:
Phoenix can't place a bus stop in every backyard, but with the help of popular ride sharing app Lyft, the city aims to make it seem that way.
At least somebody has been paying attention to my pleas.
Quote:
A new program dubbed "First Mile Last Mile" will allow riders in some Phoenix areas to use Lyft at a reduced rate for rides between their homes and one of more than 500 city bus stops.

The partnership, launched Wednesday, encourages residents who live in the northern- and southern-most portions of the city — where transit opportunities are limited — to take Lyft to the nearest bus stop, where they access the city's expansive central transit grid.
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