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  #81  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2007, 4:17 PM
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We really need a good TIC icon! I could really use it when I try to lay it on thick and people don't notice too..
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  #82  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 11:50 AM
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Wrendog, Remember when we were wondering which metro area was larger of Grand Junction and St. George? Looks like St. George will claim that spot this year some time if it hasn't already.

St. George No. 1 in U.S.; 2 Utah County cities 6th

Provo area is growing rapidly

By Deborah Bulkeley
Deseret Morning News
Washington County, anchored by St. George, continues to be the nation's fastest growing metro area with a 2006 population of 126,312 and a six-year growth rate of 40 percent, according to a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.


Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning News

The housing rising in Eagle Mountain has helped make the new community one of the growth hot spots in Utah County. St. George Mayor Dan McArthur said in the days before air conditioning became commonplace, the southwestern Utah community "was not desirable."
"Brigham Young had to call people to settle it," he said. "After the first year, of the 309 families, only about half of them were still there."
Now, he said, "it is very desirable," with clean air, a warm climate and relatively low elevation. That's reflected in strong growth since the mid-1990s.
Also showing strong growth was the Provo-Orem metro area, which ranked sixth nationally in growth from April 1, 2000, to July 1, 2006. Provo-Orem, which encompasses Utah and Juab counties, grew by 26 percent, or 97,402 people, to 474,180.
In Utah County, the hot spots are largely new communities in the northwest, such as Eagle Mountain and Saratoga Springs, along with established communities such as Lehi and American Fork. Meanwhile, those seeking to escape the county's urbanization are also starting to move south to Juab County, said Utah County Commissioner Larry Ellertson.
"New areas are developing that a decade ago were just beginning or had not begun," he said. "Now they're cities of 15,000 to 20,000."
The Census Bureau looks at metro areas as distinct from counties. Metropolitan statistical areas have an urban core of at least 50,000 people and adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core. Micropolitan statistical areas are similar but with urban cores of 10,000 to 50,000.
When compared with other metro areas, such as the Salt Lake or Provo-Orem metro areas, Washington County's growth rate is No. 1 in the nation. But, although Washington County's metro area lies within the county borders, when the county is compared with other counties of more than 10,000 people, it ranked only 19th in growth nationally from 2000 to 2006. And its one-year growth rate was actually surpassed by Wasatch County.
By contrast, when Washington County is compared to other metro areas around the nation, it ranks No. 1 in growth since 2000.
"St. George is consistently one of the fastest growing areas in the nation," said Robert Spendlove, manager of demographic and economic analysis for the Governor's Office of Planning and Budget. "The St. George area has had very strong growth for the entire decade of the 2000s."
The data show that St. George's growth has been largely due to people moving in, said Pam Perlich, senior research economist at the University of Utah. Provo-Orem, in contrast, saw most of its growth through births. So did Salt Lake, where there was a net influx of immigrants but a net domestic outmigration.
"In Washington County there's an over-representing of older age," she said. "In Utah County, there's a over-representing of college age."
She added that some of Utah's fast-growing areas may be seeing more growth than the census numbers indicate, particularly in Provo-Orem and Logan, where the census tends to underestimate the large concentrations of college students.
Despite its fast-paced growth, St. George remains relatively small for a metropolitan area, and its numerical gain of 35,958 is 91st.
And that's just fine, said McArthur, who remembers going to high school in a small town of maybe 6,000.
"We're not seeking to be the fastest-growing community in the nation," he said. "We just want to make sure we take care of the people in St. George."


Deseret Morning News Graphic

As of July 1, 2006, the 361 metro areas in the United States contained 249.2 million people — 83.2 percent of the nation's population.
In percentage growth, St. George was followed by Greeley, Colo., which grew by 31 percent to 236,857; Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Calif., which grew by 30 percent to 571,344; Bend, Ore., which saw 29 percent growth to 149,140; and Las Vegas-Paradise, Nev., which grew by 29 percent to 1.8 million.
New York was the most populous metro area on July 1, 2006, with 18.8 million people, followed by Los Angeles, with 13 million, and Chicago with 9.5 million.
The Atlanta metro area gained 890,000 residents — the nation's largest numerical gain — bringing it to a 2006 population of 5.1 million.
The outflux following Hurricane Katrina was reflected in the New Orleans metro area experiencing the greatest numeric loss over six years, declining by 292,000 people to 1 million on July 1, 2006. New Orleans also saw the biggest percentage loss of 22.2 percent, followed by coastal Gulfport-Biloxi, Miss., which was also hard-hit by Katrina and lost 7.4 percent of its population.
Utah's biggest metro area, Salt Lake, which includes Salt Lake, Tooele and Summit counties, saw the state's greatest population gain — 98,839 or 10 percent — bringing its total population to nearly 1.1 million.
The Ogden-Clearfield metro area, which includes Davis, Morgan and Weber counties, grew by 12.4 percent to 497,640. The state's smallest metro area, Logan — which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho — grew by 8 percent to 111,156.
Most of Utah's micropolitan areas have also grown since 2000. With a six-year growth of 33 percent, Heber (Wasatch County) is the nation's third fastest growing micro area. And Cedar City (Iron County) grew by 20 percent to 40,544, ranking 9th nationally. Brigham City (Box Elder County) grew by 10 percent to 47,197 and Vernal (Uintah County) grew nearly 11 percent to 27,955.
Utah's only micro area that lost population was Price (Carbon County), which has lost nearly 1,000 people since 2000, making its 2006 population 27,955.
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  #83  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 12:38 PM
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And from the Tribune,

St. George area a champ in Growth

By Matt Canham
The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated: 04/05/2007 03:27:47 AM MDT



New schools are under construction. Chain restaurants and big-box stores are multiplying. A new airport is taking shape.
Change is constant in St. George, by far the nation's fastest growing metropolitan area.
"We are just trying to deal with it the best we can," said Mayor Daniel McArthur.
A new Census Bureau report released today shows the population of St. George and its suburbs has grown by nearly 40 percent since 2000.
Second place? That belongs to Greeley, Colo., which has seen a 31 percent population spike since the start of this decade.
The report illustrates a widespread trend, where people are moving to warmer areas in the South or the West, many to retirement hot spots. Other top 10 growing metro areas include Las Vegas, Phoenix and two Florida locales.
Utah had another top 10 finisher - Provo and Orem came in as the sixth fastest growing metro area, with a 26 percent growth rate. Metro areas have at least 100,000 people. Heber and Cedar City made the top 10 fastest growing micropolitan areas, or places with 10,000 to 50,000 residents.
Robert Spendlove, the state's chief economist, said the fast growing areas are "definitely a reflection that Utah is a very attractive place to live and work."
It's also a reflection that Utah is still a cheaper place to live than many of its neighboring states.
Demographer Pam Perlich from the University of Utah says age data tells much of the story. The St. George population is one of the state's oldest, while Provo is one of the youngest.
On a percentage basis, the St. George metro area, which includes all of Washington County, has twice as many elderly residents as Salt Lake County or Utah County. Perlich said this shows many of the people flooding into St. George are retirees.
In contrast, Provo and Orem have far more college-age residents per capita, in part because of the expansion of Utah Valley University and the continued growth of Brigham Young University. Those college-age Utahns are also having lots of kids.
"Babies don't come with income, but the retired folks do," said Perlich, describing the hot growth in the St. George economy.



Low unemployment rates and lack of cheap housing make it difficult for companies to attract workers.
These business complications, along with the need for greater transportation and new utilities, have led to a comprehensive planning exercise known as Vision Dixie, which is a collaboration between Washington County government and the nonprofit planning agency Envision Utah.
In a series of workshops, residents are asked to create maps showing housing, business development and new transportation routes. Their input will ultimately lead to one vision, and the one constant is a population that continues to expand.
Such growth is not new for the St. George area. The county population has increased by at least 6 percent annually since the late 1960s. But the effect is magnified over time.
Back in the late 1960s, a little more than 11,000 people lived in the St. George area. Now, more than 126,000 people call Dixie home.
By 2035, county and city leaders expect the population to balloon to 400,000.
"We are trying to be proactive about it," said Washington County Commissioner James Eardley, who is also leading the Vision Dixie effort.
The group will release four possible growth plans, including new roadways, public transportation, dense housing and mixed-use developments, by the beginning of May.
Eardley hopes the models will become the basis for a revised Washington County land use bill that Sen. Bob Bennett and Rep. Jim Matheson will spearhead in Congress.
The original version of the bill came under fire from environmental groups because it called for the sale of up to 25,000 acres of federal lands. The money would stay in the county for conservation projects.
The Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance and the Sierra Club have fought against that bill.
Eardley said he expects Bennett and Matheson to introduce a new version in August.
Matheson said he expects the Vision Dixie process to defuse much of the criticism of the land use bill, meant to create a plan to help the county handle its burgeoning population.
More than this, Eardley hopes that St. George and other cities will use the plan as they prepare to cope with the hundreds of thousands of new Utahns to come.
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  #84  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 2:26 PM
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If those percentages stay the same, here are the expected figures for 5 years from now (2011):

Logan: 120,270
Brigham City: 52,105
Ogden/Clearfield:559,347
SLC: 1,176,629
Provo/Orem: 596,992
Heber: 26,959
Cedar City: 48,652
St. George: 176,584

wow.. the Wasatch Front population in 2011 would be 2,332,968 and that doesn't include Tooele or Summit Counties...
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  #85  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 3:34 PM
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So basically by 2011 with Summitt,Wasatch and Tooele,which are also part of the Wasatch Front Metro we'll be at the 2.5 million mark and on our way to the big................ 3 million!!!!!
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  #86  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 3:54 PM
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So basically by 2011 with Summitt,Wasatch and Tooele,which are also part of the Wasatch Front Metro we'll be at the 2.5 million mark and on our way to the big................ 3 million!!!!!
Yay...more smog, more traffic, more cookie cutter sprawl, more people in the Wasatch canyons. Do we really want to be so crowded? Where will the H2O come from? Why is it so exciting for so many people to move to a certain area? The Wasatch Front does not have a large water supply to play with and St. George certainly needs to worry about water in the future too since they are in the middle of the desert. The whole southwest is in a continuing drought cycle.
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  #87  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 3:56 PM
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who cares about water? I want a MLB team!

(yes, the water part was TIC)
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  #88  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2007, 5:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Northernlad View Post
Yay...more smog, more traffic, more cookie cutter sprawl, more people in the Wasatch canyons. Do we really want to be so crowded? Where will the H2O come from? Why is it so exciting for so many people to move to a certain area? The Wasatch Front does not have a large water supply to play with and St. George certainly needs to worry about water in the future too since they are in the middle of the desert. The whole southwest is in a continuing drought cycle.
Actually, the Wasatch Front's overall air quality has improved dramatically since the days when the population was but a fraction of what it is now. Hopefully we will be driving even much cleaner/and or electric cars and the Wasatch trend toward light and commuter rail will continue.
As for water,I very much agree.(just a thought)- We need a water pipeline up the I-15 corridor from L.A. to Vegas to St. George to the Wasatch, delivering desalinated water,"not oil."
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  #89  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2007, 12:43 PM
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Architectural styles emerging in St. George

The Springs at Snow Canyon




Can you imagine this as a view out your front window?














































Last edited by delts145; Oct 22, 2012 at 1:54 PM.
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  #90  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2007, 1:00 PM
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So I hate all the sprawl in the St. George are, but at least SOME of the developments are actually taking the geography and feel of the land into consideration when designing thier developments. The architecture and layout of this community really blends in well with the land. The developers are to be commended because they could have just built a bunch of cookie cutters typical of new subdivisions on the wasatch front like some St. George developers are.
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  #91  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2007, 11:27 AM
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I agree SLCforme,and hopefully this trend of creativity will build. I think even with starter homes people should have options other than much of the current cookie-cutter fare that is too prevalent across the country. St. George is a unique local and deserves unique options.
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  #92  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2007, 11:32 AM
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Hottest Industries: Wholesale, Business Services, Manufacturing
2007 Rank in Category: 1
2007 Overall Rank: 1
2006 Rank in Category: 2
2006 Overall Rank: 2
Growth in Nonfarm Jobs 2005-2006: 8.4%
Growth in Nonfarm Jobs 2001-2006: 41.8%



Dixie tops national list for growth

But growth of boomtown appears to be slowing

By Nancy Perkins
Deseret Morning News
ST. GEORGE — Utah's Dixie hit another economic milestone this month when Inc. magazine hailed St. George as the nation's top "boomtown" for 2007.
In the magazine's May issue, St. George took the No. 1 spot on the overall list of 393 cities. The magazine also listed its choices for the Top 20 large, midsize and small boomtown cities, based on employment growth rates over the past six years. St. George tops the list of small cities — those with populations of less than 150,000.
Michael Shires, a professor of public policy at Pepperdine University, compiled the rankings for the magazine. Other Utah cities that ranked within the top 100 on the overall list include Provo/Orem, Logan, Ogden/Clearfield and Salt Lake City.
"The fact is, we have been growing jobs, strongly and aggressively," said Scott Hirschi, Washington County's director of economic development. "No question, we've had strong job growth over that entire period from 2001 to mid-2006."
Even as Washington County finds itself the darling of numerous growth charts, Hirschi and other economists point out the region's rapid growth rate can't continue.
"We are in somewhat of a slowdown now," said Hirschi.
Lecia Parks-Langston, regional economist with the Utah Department of Workforce Services, is also sounding a cautionary note in her quarterly newsletter.
"The Washington County economy has certainly been flying high during the past several years," Langston said in her column. "But as the old adage goes, 'What goes up must come down.'"
The most current estimates available for job growth peg year-over job expansion in Washington County at less than 6 percent, she said.
"That's down substantially from the 12 percent rate of growth just a year earlier," Langston wrote. "And it's bound to slip even lower as the construction industry continues to soften."
Both Hirschi and Langston pointed out that Washington County's job growth of approximately 6 percent for the past year is considerably more than the national average of less than 2 percent, and greater than the state's 4.5 percent.
But there are other indicators that show St. George may slip next year from its lofty spot in the rankings. Among the economic indicators losing traction in Washington County are residential construction, which dropped by 42 percent between 2005 and 2006, and gross taxable sales, which plummeted from a high of nearly 25 percent during the second quarter of 2005 to only 7 percent in the third quarter of 2006.
Still, said Langston, a more moderate, slower rate of growth isn't a bad thing.
"A slowdown gives the economy and government services time to catch up with market and infrastructure needs," she said. "Employers are probably already finding the labor market more amenable to hiring, and home prices are coming down."

Boomtowns 2007

1. St. George
2. Yuma, Ariz.
3. Prescott, Ariz.
4. Fort Myers, Fla.
5. McAllen, Texas
6. Naples, Fla.
7. Las Vegas
8. Sarasota, Fla.
9. Morgantown, W. Va.
10. Bend, Ore.
31. Provo-Orem
44. Logan
62. Ogden-Clearfield
68. Salt Lake City

Source: Inc. Magazine



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last edited by delts145; Apr 24, 2007 at 12:11 PM.
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  #93  
Old Posted May 1, 2007, 3:01 AM
Happy Valley Freak Happy Valley Freak is offline
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Originally Posted by Northernlad View Post
Yay...more smog, more traffic, more cookie cutter sprawl, more people in the Wasatch canyons. Do we really want to be so crowded? Where will the H2O come from? Why is it so exciting for so many people to move to a certain area? The Wasatch Front does not have a large water supply to play with and St. George certainly needs to worry about water in the future too since they are in the middle of the desert. The whole southwest is in a continuing drought cycle.
do you have 2 be so negitive?
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  #94  
Old Posted May 1, 2007, 3:27 AM
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Unless there have been changes in the building codes in St. George, it use to be to be that NO building could be built that was taller than the Angel Moroni on the Temple. That is why most buildings use to not be taller than 3 stories.
Sorry, I know this has been posted for a while but...
There is no "Angel Moroni on the (St. George) Temple."
Just had to clear that up for everyone.
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  #95  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2007, 12:47 PM
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Southern Utah - St. George

I think a lot of us will appreciate this project and particularly it's historic feel. I for one would like to see this type of authentic,(non-faux feel) of architecture implemented throughout our different Metro projects.

St. George touts Town Square project

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1...223041,00.html

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DN

http://images.google.com/imgres?<br ...%3Den%26sa%3DN


"Newly renovated business district of St. George, Utah" by Howard A. Knudsen


A walk-through tower at Town Square features four stained-glass windows depicting the St. George area and its history. (St. George City)


" Anytime you have a vibrant, functioning downtown, where people are there, busy and enjoying themselves, it's a big draw for business," said St. George Mayor Dan McArthur. "It's been exciting to have this come together and watch it grow."


Des. News
New St. George Library at Town Square

..

Last edited by delts145; Oct 31, 2007 at 1:06 PM.
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  #96  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2007, 2:45 PM
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Brian Head, Southern Utah

A Major New Bridge, New Lifts, Vegas Mega-Developers, 35% expanded ski-terrain. Brian Head begins an era of Big Development !!

It links 2 main areas;

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1...236229,00.html



The new ski bridge in use at Brian Head connects Navajo and Giant Steps ski mountains. It spans state Route 143. Brian head Resort)

Proposed and approved developments already in the works could potentially double the town's assessed tax value, said the mayor, who has held an elected office in Brian Head since 1977.

"One of the challenges here for the town and staff is we go along catering to 100 residents or so, and then all of a sudden, boom, we grow to 6,000 people," the mayor said.


..
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  #97  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2008, 12:49 PM
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Feds promise St. George up to $90 million for airport - City finally clears hurdle to begin work on new site

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1...244137,00.html


new St. George regional airport

"This nearly completes all of the funding we will receive from the federal government for this project," LaPier said. "A lot of people have been under the false impression that this airport wouldn't be built. This inverstment from the federal government should convince them that it is going to happen."

..
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  #98  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2008, 10:51 PM
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State-of-the-art Sky of Dreams Ranch, and Film Production Studio announced for Southern Utah near St. George

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1...246281,00.html


Mike Terry, Deseret Morning News
Sausha Seus, who specializes in therapy using animals and whose parents were handlers of Bart the Bear, says she has invested her heart in Sky of Dreams. At right is Mac Adamson, a managing member and co-founder of the ranch.

Construction on what investors are calling an arts and entertainment community is supposed to begin by the end of 2008. As for a dollar amount for the project, it will be in the "multi, multi millions."

..

Last edited by delts145; Jan 23, 2008 at 12:30 PM.
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  #99  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2008, 11:12 PM
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MASS MEDIA DISTRIBUTION NEWSWIRE

UTAH FIRMS TO UNVEIL PLANS FOR MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR FILM PRODUCTION CAMPUS IN UTAH

http://www.mmdnewswire.com/utah-firms-2799.html


.
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  #100  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2008, 11:19 PM
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Massive film production campus planned for St. George--

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/252326/18/

.
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