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  #21  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 5:34 PM
MacGyver MacGyver is offline
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Rotterdam a major world city of the future

Rotterdam is a city for the uneducated and unemployed, not for the well educated and rich. This will never change...
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  #22  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 8:20 PM
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^THAT's your first post? And you expect to stay long?
This is your first and last warning; act civilized or you're gone

sullying a good name like MacGyver makes it just that extra bit bad.
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  #23  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 10:13 PM
Qaabus Qaabus is offline
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Rotterdam does have plans to build 56000 homes in the city centre by 2025. They will need highrises to achieve that.
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  #24  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2007, 7:36 PM
MacGyver MacGyver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Swede View Post
^THAT's your first post? And you expect to stay long?
This is your first and last warning; act civilized or you're gone

sullying a good name like MacGyver makes it just that extra bit bad.
Truth hurts.
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  #25  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2007, 8:32 PM
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Truth hurts.
On SSP it's 2 strikes and you're out...
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For some the coast signifies the end of their country and for some it signifies the beginning of the world...
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  #26  
Old Posted May 3, 2007, 8:20 PM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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Originally Posted by Qaabus View Post
Rotterdam does have plans to build 56000 homes in the city centre by 2025. They will need highrises to achieve that.
Really. Bloody hell Birmingham needs to build 96,000 by 2020. The cities population about 20 years ago at night was about 30. Now its up to roughly 18,000 with apartments left right and center. Its never really been fashionable to live in the cities after the war on top of everything.
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  #27  
Old Posted May 3, 2007, 8:22 PM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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P.S Skyscrapers also do signal success. You can only build them in these countries if there is relevant demand. A growing skyline which is recognisable gets world wide attention. Birmingham lost its historical skyline during the blitz. I new one would give it media attention and the rest. Plus we're going to have Europes first vertical theme park in the center of the city standing close to 180m.
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  #28  
Old Posted May 13, 2007, 10:03 PM
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Eric Offereins Eric Offereins is offline
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I know Rotterdam will never be in the top 3 of Europe, but we got some pretty stuff coming up. A selection from the dutch section of skyscrapercity by SkyBridge:

UC:








approved, start in or before 2008:








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  #29  
Old Posted May 21, 2007, 8:18 PM
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I cannot se any similarities at all...
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  #30  
Old Posted May 24, 2007, 5:19 PM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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I cannot se any similarities at all...
No?

Ummm ...

2nd largest cities of both countries, densest regional cities blah blah! ...
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  #31  
Old Posted May 29, 2007, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Citrus-Fruit View Post
No?

Ummm ...

2nd largest cities of both countries, densest regional cities blah blah! ...
Let's be honest, that is a little vague. Should we compare Los Angeles with Lyon then, Melbourne with Wellington etc and say they are similar because they are all the 2nd largest cities in each country.

Rotterdam and Birmingham have very little in common. Well, both nice cities though.
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  #32  
Old Posted May 29, 2007, 7:09 PM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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They have alot in common. More then most. Rotterdam is the best city to compare to Birmingham. Both built densely many years ago, both are trying to become major european cities although being arguably dominated by thier respective capitals. However, lets go back to the first post of thsi thread ... If you're to vague with respective arguments like - they have nothing in common at all, why would anyone waste time in replying with a full list of reasons why they are?
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  #33  
Old Posted May 29, 2007, 7:52 PM
RazzC RazzC is offline
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Den Haag is much more densely populated than Rotterdam. (because the municipaly of Rotterdam contains the harbors)
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  #34  
Old Posted May 29, 2007, 9:43 PM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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Huh? I thinking you're being a bit picky here. Densely populated with high-rise commie blocks? Den Hagg is'nt comparable to Birmingham like Rotterdam is! People ... you guys seem to be missing the whole point.
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  #35  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 6:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Citrus-Fruit View Post
They have alot in common. More then most. Rotterdam is the best city to compare to Birmingham. Both built densely many years ago, both are trying to become major european cities although being arguably dominated by thier respective capitals. However, lets go back to the first post of thsi thread ... If you're to vague with respective arguments like - they have nothing in common at all, why would anyone waste time in replying with a full list of reasons why they are?
Sorry, I still don’t get it. In your first post all you say is that they have a similar skyline, which I also find completely odd. Rotterdam has a much larger skyline than Birmingham at this present stage. What else do they have in common?

Rotterdam is a coastal city (close enough). Birmingham is inland.
Rotterdam has one of the world’s largest ports. Birmingham isn’t a port city.
The architecture is vastly different
Rotterdam has a subway, Birmingham doesn’t.
Sure, both have canals, but they are vastly different in style. It's a bit like saying New York and London are similar because they both have streets.

Of cause, it's perfectly acceptable to compare two completely different cities.

But I just don't see the simularities here.
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  #36  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 4:51 PM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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Both developed due to thier ports (Birmingham had to build its network), both were the industrial cities of thier respective nations, both are indeed the known second cities of thier respective nations - however, what the whole thread was about, is both cities COUNCILS WANT TO TURN THIER CITY INTO A TOP TIER EUROPEAN POWERHOUSE. How can they achieve it, skyscrapers are both high on the agenda of both cities leaders, they both believe highrise cities will give them a recognisable skyline which will be noticed all over the world - the exact question was this

Quote:
These two cities have quite a similar situation with quite similar height ranging skylines. Along with Frankfurt are these two cities going to become major world cities within the next 15 years.
Frankfurt developed from near enough nothing and become the powerhouse of Germany. Can Rotterdam and Birmingham become recognised powerhouses of thier respective nations to a lesser extent then Frankfurt with thiers. This thread had nothing to do with similarities. Just people being picky. However, they have very SIMILAR AGENDA'S!
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  #37  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 5:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Citrus-Fruit View Post

Frankfurt developed from near enough nothing and become the powerhouse of Germany.
What leads you to think that Frankfurt developed from "near nothing"? Frankfurt has been a leading european center of trade and finance for centuries.
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  #38  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 6:01 PM
RazzC RazzC is offline
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You don't really hear the political parties in Rotterdam about an ambition to be a top powerhouse. Rotterdam has a different share of problems, with an according political agenda.

Last edited by RazzC; May 30, 2007 at 6:23 PM.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2007, 9:06 AM
Citrus-Fruit Citrus-Fruit is offline
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What leads you to think that Frankfurt developed from "near nothing"? Frankfurt has been a leading european center of trade and finance for centuries.
So has Rotterdam and Birmingham! But I meant near enough nothing in terms of development! Frankfurt completely re-invented itself to stay at the top, these two didnt until now!
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  #40  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2007, 9:25 AM
BenL BenL is offline
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I think Rotterdam can look to a more prosperous future than Birmingham. It has Europe's largest port and in the Benelux, has a far more central European location. Perhaps more importantly, there is far less primacy in the Netherlands than the UK, with The Hague the political centre, Amsterdam the commercial and cultural centre and Rotterdam the industrial centre. The Dutch government realises this and with the high-speed rail network it is hoping to connect all three cities within a very short time so as a group they can achieve what neither city could do on its own and compete on a world scale. In this respect the Netherlands are much closer to Germany - which also has no real primacy - with Frankfurt, like Rotterdam, fulfilling a specific function.

In Britain, London fulfills all the major functions and is the very clear primary city. Whilst Birmingham has, like most post-industrial British cities, experienced something of a renaissance in the last ten years with a variety of projects and increased investment, this is hardly evidence for Birmingham becoming a "top tier European powerhouse", which is doing little more than conforming to a trend during a period of British economic prosperity. The regional city I have seen most change in in Britain is Manchester, which has become a hugely confident, cosmopolitan city - feeling a bit like a British San Francisco. It is fast becoming Britain's second city and if any British city has the potential to be one of Europe's major cities, and I have strong doubts, then it is Manchester.
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