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  #161  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 2:58 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
yeah i mean, take south central, or even lower beverly hills, strip away the vegetation and mediterranean fake-flare and you have almost an identical built environment with similar tree lawn and sidewalk dimensions, housing types. the divergence on the commercial corridors, massive later century apartment infill and replacement, owing to wealth shifts, demographics, etc has been stark of course, but it was them same bones.
Southern Beverly Hills does have a older feel to it. Alot of/1940s residential complexes that look like it could be an older midwestern/east coast city. This goes for Mid City in LA, as you move down Olympic towards Koreatown. It's an interesting area I don't think alot of tourists see. Even locals.
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  #162  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 3:04 PM
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Southern Beverly Hills does have a older feel to it. Alot of/1940s residential complexes that look like it could be an older midwestern/east coast city. This goes for Mid City in LA, as you move down Olympic towards Koreatown. It's an interesting area I don't think alot of tourists see. Even locals.
mid city is another area for sure. i was staying in highland park a few weeks ago but was going back and forth between the westside and saw this area when i had to get off the 10 due to traffic. the actual thought i had around mid city (or somewhere near) was detroit in 1960s or 70s...lots of fully intact but sort of deferred maintenance neighborhoods. lots of frame houses..endless commercial corridors, low slung. the presence of the 10 sort of felt malevolent in spots in a way you see in the midwest.
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  #163  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 3:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Even today, the more intact Detroit corridors have an LA-ish hybrid urban-suburb feel, Clearly auto oriented, but parking in the rear and theoretical walkability. You don't really get this look in the NE Corridor or the older Midwestern cities:

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4204...7i16384!8i8192
that looks like it could almost be dempster street in morton grove (chicagoland).

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0409...7i16384!8i8192





Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Parts of the bungalow belt in Chicago can look like LA/Detroit.
for sure, the bunglow belts in all 3 bear some resemblance to each other in general form, if not detail.

the dead give away for chicago bungalow belt is no driveways, because of chicago's obsession with alleys, whereas in detroit and LA bungalow belt you see back lot detached garages just like chicago, but with long side yard driveways leading out to the street.
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Aug 22, 2019 at 3:47 PM.
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  #164  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 3:45 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
70 years ago, in 1950 when L.A. had a population of 1.9 million and Detroit was around 1.8 million, they really weren't that similar.

This thread isn't about what cities were similar to one another at some random point in time.
Well, Detroit was far more dense than L.A. in 1950... But, the similarities are strong. IMO, they are shockingly strong for two cities that are located thousands of miles from each other, and in very different climates.

The art deco architecture in each city's downtown could be swapped to one another and not look out of place. Both cities initially grew around vast street car networks that were abandoned for the personal automobile. Then they both pioneered the urban freeway.

I think there are a lot of family ties as well. It may be more pronounced on the Detroit side, since it is a smaller region with sluggish growth. But my grandparents grew up in L.A., met there, got married and then moved to Detroit. Most of my grandmother's family still lives there.
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  #165  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 3:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
You don't really get this look in the NE Corridor or the older Midwestern cities:

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4204...7i16384!8i8192
Not so sure about that:
https://goo.gl/maps/cJYEkTZuW9EWBSJu8

https://goo.gl/maps/uNVAd1DNiSYQMif8A
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  #166  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 4:03 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yes, and you could actually even do the same for Trois-Rivières.
Tu ne crois pas si bien dire! The two links I posted, there was one of each city, on purpose... the first was Quebec City and the second was Trois-Rivières. Either you didn't bother clicking on the street views, or else even you got fooled

And yes, this housing type (fully residential attached multiplex on tiny lots) isn't found in Sherbrooke at all. And probably not Gatineau either.

Makes sense, if you consider that 3R was (very probably) Quebec's third urban hub at the time. Up to WWII I'd say.

Another proof of this is that Sherbrooke has nothing that even comes close to comparing to the Ameau Building. Unreplicable "good leftover bones" from a prewar period where 3R was a more important city than Sherbrooke (which has been totally reversed now - let alone compared to Gatineau)
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  #167  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 4:07 PM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Well, Detroit was far more dense than L.A. in 1950... But, the similarities are strong. IMO, they are shockingly strong for two cities that are located thousands of miles from each other, and in very different climates.
Yeah, and that's what makes this case more interesting than others.

Wilmington being a junior Philly isn't anything special. San Diego looks like LA. The rowhouses in Albany are the exact same style as in NYC, just often with a couple stories less. etc.

That's so normal that the opposite would actually be more noteworthy.
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  #168  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 4:17 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by dave8721 View Post
I agree they are different I was just pointing out that Miami and Pheonix both have the sort of densely packed suburbia that just abruptly stops rather than petering out like most places. If that is how he was saying Miami and Pheonix were the same then at least I could see that comparison.
That is a very common thing with Auto-centric metros in general especially out west

We have discussed it before, in older areas where lands are almost always private vs out west where preserves, parks, reservations and Government land cause hard instant breaks in urban development.

Instead of the true smooth transition from Hyper-Urban to rural you get moderate density from city center right to a hard stop in wilderness or farmland.

Suburban Phoenix ending in Indian Reservation agriculture



Vegas ending in open desert:

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  #169  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 4:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
that looks like it could almost be dempster street in morton grove (chicagoland).

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0409...7i16384!8i8192
Or even several areas on the far north side within the city limits.

N. Lincoln:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9865...7i16384!8i8192

W. Peterson: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9903...7i16384!8i8192
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  #170  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 4:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
If we are talking burbs than any cities burbs to any other are pretty similar other than plants and what materials coat the outside of single family homes.

I cant imagine how anyone could think Phoenix and Miami (or Tampa) are similar at all, Dallas maybe but really its more comparable to other western cities like Vegas, Denver, Salt Lake, much of the LA area, Sacramento, etc etc

I exclude El Paso, ABQ and Tucson as they have retained a unique "southwestern" or "old west" feel compared to the cities I listed above. Places like Denver, Vegas, LA, Phoenix which had very western vibes (sometimes recently) have all shed that feel for a more "West Coast" in general feel.

Florida? Absolutely not..
On the Phoenix/Tampa comparison, I've never been to Tampa, but my brief Streetview tour of downtown Tampa definitely reminded me of downtown Phoenix. Felt like a very similar mix of parking/undeveloped lots, superblock-y towers, and parking garages, with very few smaller, truly pedestrian-oriented buildings. Plus Tampa seemed to have the same general mix of architectural eras--dominated by 1960s - 90s towers, with a few older, and a slowly increasing stock of newer towers.
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  #171  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 4:49 PM
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Originally Posted by RCDC View Post
There are corridors from that era almost everywhere, of course, but they aren't representative typologies, as in Detroit and LA.

And I'm not even sure if these are equivalent. RI Ave. in DC is more a classic urban corridor. Rockville Center, NY is a typical Long Island railroad commuter suburb. Neither are really characterized by the early auto age.
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  #172  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 5:19 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by muertecaza View Post
On the Phoenix/Tampa comparison, I've never been to Tampa, but my brief Streetview tour of downtown Tampa definitely reminded me of downtown Phoenix. Felt like a very similar mix of parking/undeveloped lots, superblock-y towers, and parking garages, with very few smaller, truly pedestrian-oriented buildings. Plus Tampa seemed to have the same general mix of architectural eras--dominated by 1960s - 90s towers, with a few older, and a slowly increasing stock of newer towers.
Eh, I guess in terms of building age/stock but I still dont get the impression that they are similar, I was in Tampa once long ago but Ive been around southern Florida (not the same animal I know).

Not too sure where the center of Tampa is but I think its generally around this square/park. Somebody please correct me if Im incorrect.

https://goo.gl/maps/a4JZiHJAbjtNfdJg7

Vs what I consider basically the center of Phoenix( you can go north or south a couple blocks along central they all would generally cont as the center): https://goo.gl/maps/9VamNHLEzdGsRN8b7

They just dont really seem that similar to me, but You really need to go to a place to get the feel of it more than looking.
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  #173  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 5:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Handro View Post
Or even several areas on the far north side within the city limits.

N. Lincoln:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9865...7i16384!8i8192

W. Peterson: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9903...7i16384!8i8192
yeah, in places those streets kinda work too, although they are often broken up by mulit-story development here and there, as evidenced in your streetviews.

i went with dempster in morton grove because it is so uniformly single-story like the detroit street that crawford posted. when i first clicked his link i immediately thought to myself "that's dempster".
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  #174  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 5:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
morton grove


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  #175  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 6:36 PM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Parts of the bungalow belt in Chicago can look like LA/Detroit.
To say that ANY area of Chicago resembles ANY area of L.A. is to say that a certain area of Oklahoma City resembles a certain area of NYC.
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  #176  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 6:59 PM
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I've lived in both, so....
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  #177  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2019, 9:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
There are corridors from that era almost everywhere, of course, but they aren't representative typologies, as in Detroit and LA.

And I'm not even sure if these are equivalent. RI Ave. in DC is more a classic urban corridor. Rockville Center, NY is a typical Long Island railroad commuter suburb. Neither are really characterized by the early auto age.
Well, however they were envisioned is not really relevant, it's what they are at present. Manhattan is full of ROWs that appear as wide, the difference is that these are vastly underutilized and underbuilt, making them seem wider than they really are. Cut this down to one story and you'll see what I mean. They're ripe for dense mixed use redevelopment and could accommodate a rail or dedicated bus.
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  #178  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2019, 4:22 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Tu ne crois pas si bien dire! The two links I posted, there was one of each city, on purpose... the first was Quebec City and the second was Trois-Rivières. Either you didn't bother clicking on the street views, or else even you got fooled

)
When I clicked on the links, the location ID showed "Quebec" only, not the city and not the street. It's a minor bug I sometimes get in StreetView.
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  #179  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2019, 6:07 PM
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Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
To say that ANY area of Chicago resembles ANY area of L.A. is to say that a certain area of Oklahoma City resembles a certain area of NYC.
Don't be scared, but the intro shots of the exterior of buildings used on Seinfeld (for example, Jerry's building) that were supposedly in New York are actually located in LA.

Pretty much any two cities have areas that can resemble each other.
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  #180  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2019, 6:39 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Originally Posted by PHX31 View Post
Don't be scared, but the intro shots of the exterior of buildings used on Seinfeld (for example, Jerry's building) that were supposedly in New York are actually located in LA.

Pretty much any two cities have areas that can resemble each other.
The exterior stairwell would be a dead giveaway that the building isn't in NYC. The show couldn't have pulled that off in the social media era. They would've been called out from every direction.

Ironically, exterior stairwells were non-existent in pre-war NYC, and hardly any existed in the 90s, but they are becoming common now in new construction buildings.
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