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  #1881  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 8:36 PM
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It would be cool if there was a public forum where people could express their opinions about new buildings going up....
It's the oldest forum in the world.

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  #1882  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 2:08 AM
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  #1883  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 2:47 AM
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The crane should be arriving before too long and steel erection should begin next month. Here's a little more on the process of getting the site ready...


http://foresternetwork.com/grading-e...rm-foundation/

Project Profile: Starting a Firm Foundation
Excavating for a skyscraper foundation in New York City


June 1, 2017


Quote:
“I feel like a conductor,” says Ted Civetta with a grin as he stands amidst the bustle of New York City and watches the seemingly choreographed movements of excavators and breakers in a pit 55 feet below him.

Civetta has earned a reputation as being one of the best foundation guys in the area. His grandfather started the business after emigrating from northern Italy in the 1920s. Now Civetta’s son, Patrick, is the fourth generation to work in the family business, John Civetta & Sons. From a humble start building stone foundations, the company now boasts a resume of some of the largest, most technically challenging foundation projects in New York.

The latest such project for which Civetta is orchestrating the crew, equipment, and materials is a $45 million job that will span 18 months and result in a nearly acre-sized base, for what will be the third tallest building in the United States. And it’s all being done in the middle of the world’s largest central business district.

What Goes Up Must First Go Down

Five buildings in midtown Manhattan came down to make way for One Vanderbilt Place. John Civetta & Sons helped wrap up the demolition and then got to work excavating the site, which had its official groundbreaking October 18, 2016.

Madison Avenue runs along the west side of the huge block where Civetta’s crew runs a John Deere 650 excavator, as well as two CAT 365s and a Komatsu 600 armed with Atlas Copco HB 7000 hydraulic breakers. To the east stands Grand Central Station, the historic and iconic hub of New York transportation. Thousands of passengers move in and out of the station daily, with light rail and subway cars traveling in, out, and past the station on 67 tracks, many of which parallel the massive excavation pit and can even be seen through holes that will be future subway entrances to One Vanderbilt. But for now, it’s simply a hole big enough to hold the water from 30 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

“In most parts of the country, you hire an excavator, and then you hire a concrete guy,” says Civetta. “In New York City, you hire a contractor that does both the excavation and the concrete foundation. We create a bathtub, and, once the building is up to street level, we hand it off to another specialty contractor who builds the towers.”

Civetta, 60, moves around the site with the passion and agility of a man half his age. He has a feather attached to his fedora-shaped hardhat—and he’s earned the right to “tuck a feather in his cap,” as the saying goes. In New York, the Civetta name is practically synonymous with large-scale foundation work.

“He’s a professional engineer by trade, and he’s very knowledgeable. When it comes to rock excavation, there aren’t many people better at what he does,” says Frank Caporaso, who owns CAP Rents in nearby Astoria, NY.

He’s known Civetta since the early ’80s, when the two family-owned businesses began working together. Civetta trusts Caporaso and his son, Vincent, the third generation of CAP Rents, with his equipment rental needs.

Rock type and hardness differs greatly across each of New York City’s five boroughs, which makes the experience of CAP Rents, a rental business Caporaso’s father started in 1969, necessary to ensure the best equipment is matched to each specific job site.

In the case of One Vanderbilt, the site is laden with mica schist, Manhattan schist, and granite to the rate of 60,000+ PSI, an extremely high capacity rating for rock. By the time Civetta’s team is done, they will have removed 70,000 cubic yards of material, 50,000 cubic yards of which will be rock.

Work That’s Hard As a Rock

Breaking through that much material—hard material, at that—takes the right tools to ensure productivity and meet deadlines. That correlates directly with profits, too; there’s a major fine for each day Civetta’s crew goes past deadline, but also a hefty bonus for each day they’re ahead.

CAP Rents takes their role in that process seriously, whether it’s recommending the right equipment or being ready at all times to provide onsite service. They work closely with Atlas Copco technicians who come onsite to offer training on operating and servicing hydraulic breakers, compressors, and generators. That ensures the entire CAP Rents team is ready to help with any customer needs.

When Civetta was working on a job on the West Side in April 2016—and dealing with some of the toughest rock he’d ever experienced—Caporaso recommended that Civetta try something new. After visiting with Eudes Defoe, Mid-Atlantic regional channel manager with Atlas Copco, Caporaso was convinced that Atlas Copco’s HB 7000 hydraulic breaker could help Civetta’s productivity in the challenging environment. Defoe had the breaker brought to the site for a trial.

“The HB 7000 breaker weighs the same as the breaker they were using from another manufacturer, but we knew it would offer Teddy significantly more productivity,” says Defoe. “It uses AutoControl, which adjusts the breaker’s output while it’s operating, as well as a technologically advanced nitrogen piston accumulator that ensures consistently high impact energy.”

That performance showed, and Civetta was instantly sold on making the switch. “We find that these hammers hit harder and slower, which we think is better. They handle wear better, too,” he says. “With the other hammer we were using, we got to a point where it wouldn’t take the rock out any more. Then we started hammering with the HB 7000, and all of a sudden we started taking rock again. We know they’re effective, and they have a really great warranty on them. For what we do, it’s a better product. Plus, we have been using Atlas Copco rock drills since I was young.”

The HB 7000 features a 280- to 450-bpm impact rate and can excavate and extract as much as 800,000 pounds of rock in an eight-hour day. This equates to an impressive 3.2 million pounds a day for Civetta’s crew.

“I just don’t know how they’re able to achieve that kind of size to power ratio,” says Caporaso of the breaker.

Civetta credits the hammer’s tool steel for helping with productivity, too. “We find the chisel points on these hammers last longer than anything else,” he says. “The tool steel is incredible—the best in the industry by far. We run these machines 10 hours a day, six days a week, so we really don’t give equipment much of a break.”

An unscheduled break leaves tens of thousands of dollars on the line if it leads to missing a deadline. CAP Rents works closely with Atlas Copco to make sure that doesn’t happen. The partnership ensures parts are ready and will be at the job site as quickly as possible.

In short, “these guys are on it,” says Civetta of the service and support.

All Is Calm at the Site

Beyond fast service and high productivity, the equipment combination is especially well suited to the challenges of construction in the heart of a huge city. “If you see what foundation contractors do and how they work in Manhattan, it’s mind-boggling,” says Caporaso. “You have buildings right next to the site. There are skyscrapers butting up against the site. You can’t under cut. There are tiebacks to reinforce the walls. You’ve got the subway running underground. It’s just incredible the amount of engineering that goes into this work.”

Vibration monitors all around the construction site closely measure and record the effects of the breakers on nearby structures, from the massive amount of utilities running along Madison Avenue to the belowground Metro North parking garage and the retail stores in the lower level of Grand Central. “That’s one of the great things about Atlas Copco breakers today—it’s very difficult to create vibrations with them,” says Civetta.

Atlas Copco’s HB breaker range incorporates a VibroSilenced Plus system that isolates the percussion mechanism and breaker box to reduce noise and vibrations. The breakers also have an EnergyRecovery system that uses the recoil energy to power the next blow, which maximizes power while lowering vibrations.

“I can’t think of a more ideal tool for this type of project,” says Tom Schwind, a business development manager for Atlas Copco. “Between the need to hammer through incredibly hard rock quickly, and yet do so without vibrations that would disturb passersby and businesses, there’s really no other reasonable solution for demolition work in the heart of a city.”

Technology has come a long way since Civetta had to rely on blasts to get through tough rock—using enough to get results, but not too much to cause excessive vibration and noise issues. Now they watch the vibration monitors, and, if it’s getting close to the limits in a sensitive area, they switch to a smaller breaker or, if necessary, to a rock splitter.

Fast Tracking to the Foundation

The equipment combination that CAP Rents provided had Civetta’s team well ahead of schedule on the project after just a month onsite. Civetta set a goal of hauling 200 truckloads of rock out each week to a pit in New Jersey, and he was hitting that goal “like clockwork.”

“Frankly, we got so far ahead with the rock, because the hammers are so good. We really have to catch up around the perimeter doing the support of the excavation,” he says. “One of the most challenging parts of excavation in Manhattan is holding up everything around the site—the buildings, streets, subways—so there is a certain amount of support excavation that we need to do.”

With all of the rock out and the sides braced, Civetta’s team will move to pouring the walls and then the foundation. With roughly 900 feet of wall surrounding what will essentially be three tall basements, each with a separate concrete floor, Civetta says it will take 15 60-foot pours per ring. At three days a pour and 45 pours needed, just that portion will take about six months, which started in early February 2017. With 4,000 cubic yards of concrete going in along with 500 tons of reinforcing steel, it will be the largest concrete pour ever done in Manhattan.

After the building’s foundation is secure, Civetta’s team will move on to other large-scale projects, all while keeping watch on the building’s progress.

Once complete, the quarter-mile tall One Vanderbilt Place will complement Grand Central Station but, rather than a base of stone, it will be glass. A sloped ceiling of terra-cotta tiles will lift from 50 feet at the west end to 110 feet on the east as the lobby opens to Grand Central and a pedestrian-only area where tens of thousands of people will pass by hourly between the grandeur of two buildings built a century apart.

But, as musician David Allan Coe once said, “It is not the beauty of the building you should look at, it’s the construction of the foundation that will stand the test of time.”

Quote:
One Vanderbilt Place
Height: 1,401 feet (including antenna spire)

Floors: 57

Square Feet: 1.6 million

Building Cost: $3 billion or more Anticipated


http://www.enr.com/articles/41991-su...nderbilt-rises

Will One of New York's Future Tallest Also Be Its Greenest?


Quote:
Led by SL Green Realty as owner and developer, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates as architect and Tishman Construction as construction manager, the skyscraper seeks to raise the global standard on sustainable design and construction. From big-ticket items such as a 1.2-MW cogeneration system and a 50,000-gallon rainwater collection and treatment system to a comprehensive and continuous focus on sustainable priorities in nearly every aspect of the project, One Vanderbilt is set to up the ante in real estate development, industry observers say.

“It is probably one of greatest locations of an office building anywhere in the world,” says Carlo Scissura, president and CEO of the New York Building Congress. “Other owners are saying ‘We’re going to need to compete on sustainability and really set the bar high.’ ”

The development and project team put a strong focus on green design and construction from the earliest planning stage, says Liz Majkowski, SL Green’s senior vice president of operations and director of sustainability. “We knew from the initial design, in conversations with the architect, that we wanted this to be the highest level of LEED certification,” she says, adding that team members also are pursuing certification under the international WELL building standard that measures features impacting human health and well-being.

.....Achieving WELL certification draws from similar efforts, including use of low-VOC materials and systems to filter out external air pollutants and boost water quality as well as reliance on green cleaning materials and maximized natural daylight—in part through floor-to-ceiling windows on 15-ft to 20-ft floor heights, she says. Those extra-tall heights translate into only 57 floors in the building, despite its towering height.
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  #1884  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 3:38 PM
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https://www.instagram.com/p/BU-AZQYl...-by=_rvillalta

Quote:
One Vanderbilt loading dock level.




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  #1885  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 4:32 PM
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Amazing...
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  #1886  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2017, 12:34 AM
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #1887  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2017, 1:08 AM
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so then, at only 58 stories, it's still a full 1,401 ft. high ?, I'm so hoping . .
very impressive . . and very thankfully, a rarefied shapely architectural form . .
worthy of that great height . . I love its tapering, crystalline, deco shape . .
which guarantees us, a soaring dignified symbol of NYC's genuine urban Pride . .
well into the future . . Its indisputable excellence, is such palpably satisfying relief . .
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  #1888  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 8:39 PM
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  #1889  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 10:58 PM
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How do they get those excavators out of the pit when the steel and concrete starts to go vertical?
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  #1890  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2017, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
How do they get those excavators out of the pit when the steel and concrete starts to go vertical?


heavytruckphotos

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  #1891  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2017, 2:20 PM
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^I figured as much...very cool to see it in action though...
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  #1892  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 4:34 AM
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  #1893  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 5:43 PM
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Wow this project is pretty amazing to watch. Thanks for all the updates.
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  #1894  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 1:50 AM
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Video Link




Video Link




The truck lifts are what we see up to street level...



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  #1895  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 12:01 PM
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Surprised there's no crane or even a visible crane base taking form.
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  #1896  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 3:07 PM
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Originally Posted by yankeesfan1000 View Post
Surprised there's no crane or even a visible crane base taking form.

Soon. Unless there's a crane shortage (imagine), we're getting close.


Quote:
Steel erection is scheduled to begin July, 2017.
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  #1897  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2017, 4:29 PM
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Due to supplier issues, the tower will have to make due with this for the time being:

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  #1898  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 12:07 AM
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^ Lol



http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...rly-impossible

Why developing in Midtown remains a Herculean task
Obstacles are daunting with or without rezoning



Greg David By Greg David
June 18, 2017


Quote:
The City Council will—finally—soon approve a rezoning of Midtown East designed to do nothing less than save the city’s most crucial business district and the most prodigious payer of property tax.

Let’s hope it works.

The Park Avenue office neighborhood is home to more Fortune 500 companies than anywhere else in the country and—because it receives no tax breaks—represents 10% of the property tax base. But it has been losing its allure to the Hudson Yards area—and to a lesser extent the new construction at the World Trade Center—because Midtown East’s buildings are more than 70 years old, on average. One can see the impact in relocations, especially that of BlackRock, the world’s largest money manager, to the Far West Side.

Reviving the corridor will be difficult because nowhere are the hurdles to building more daunting, as SL Green CEO Marc Holliday enumerated last week at a Crain’s real estate conference.

Sites are challenging and expensive to assemble, buying out existing tenants is time-consuming and filled with drama, navigating land use and landmarks issues with the city is risky and construction costs are the highest in the nation. Without more density and height than allowed by current zoning, projects are simply not economical.

Holliday’s signature 1 Vanderbilt tower across from Grand Central took 11 years to assemble, required a special rezoning of the Vanderbilt corridor, necessitated a deal with the city for $220 million in improvements to the transit hub and adjacent areas and will cost more than $1 billion to build. He will need rents well north of $150 a square foot to make any profit.

Holliday noted that despite the record job growth in the city and the robust economy, only four new office projects are underway in Midtown. No wonder, given the risks. He ticked off all the ways he violated the rules of real estate with 1 Vanderbilt, notably by building on spec (without tenants in hand) and not using as-of-right zoning.

Even getting this far in the Midtown East rezoning has taken almost five years and some tough-minded government officials. A fair amount of credit goes to Robert Steel, deputy mayor during the Bloomberg administration, whose long if losing battle for new zoning did effectively make the case for change. De Blasio planning chief Carl Weisbrod made the proposal that made it politically possible.

The administration predicts that the zoning could spur as many as 16 new office towers. That seems optimistic. Reaching anywhere near that number will require brave developers, receptive real estate financing markets and a city economy that continues to prosper.

After the City Council acts, the future of Midtown East will be up to the private sector. The stakes for the city are enormous.
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #1899  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 1:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Due to supplier issues, the tower will have to make due with this for the time being:
That's the crane used at Tribeca Royale (19 Park Place)!

I recall seeing one, just like that, but a little smaller.



It's also another reason why 19 Park place has taken 97 Septendecillion years to build. And it's still u/c!
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  #1900  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2017, 2:37 AM
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That looks like one EXPENSIVE German toy!
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