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  #21  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2007, 11:09 PM
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could someone show me a map on where exactly Riverview and the wave park are/will be? I use to live right around there at University and Dobson.
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  #22  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 2:14 PM
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The wave park will go on the NW corner of Dobson and University. It will replace the Riverview municipal golf course. The Riverview development is on the NE corner of Unversity and Dobson, south of the 202.
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  #23  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2007, 10:46 PM
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Since I'm no good at Photoshop or other graphics programs, here is my attempt to answer the question:



Waveyard is quite a ways from releasing any site plans but they'll be where the golf course and softball fields are currently.

Go to www.mesariverview.com for a site plan of the Riverview area.
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  #24  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 1:03 AM
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Here's the site plan for Riverview from www.mesariverview.com

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  #25  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 2:24 AM
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I enjoy how they have the Salt River colored blue and are calling the project "Riverview"- how about "dirt view" or "old tire view" or "rock quarry view"
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  #26  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 3:20 AM
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There is that wet riparian area under where the 101 meets the 202, but it certainly isn't blue as far east as shown on the map. I haven't heard about any plans to expand the riparian area eastward.

Looking at the second map, there doesn't look to be nearly enough parking. Home Depot and Walmart alone should take up the lower portion of the parking lot. Those other little businesses on the left are going to be squeezed it looks like.
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  #27  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 3:39 AM
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thanks for the map, it really helps out. And there is definitely enough parking in Riverview.
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  #28  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 6:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAHOPL View Post
Looking at the second map, there doesn't look to be nearly enough parking. Home Depot and Walmart alone should take up the lower portion of the parking lot. Those other little businesses on the left are going to be squeezed it looks like.
There's PLENTY of parking. From driving the site this week, each of the big-box stores appears to have the same amount of parking they would have in a stand-along setting, plus there are tons more parking areas for the other buildings and pad retailers. My guess is that you'll never see the parking filled up in the center part of the development (adjacent to the curved road).
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  #29  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2007, 7:38 PM
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From the Republic...
Quote:
Urban village planned near Chandler mall
Luci Scott
The Arizona Republic
Mar. 12, 2007 12:00 AM

A $100 million, mixed-use project that includes 342 condominiums plus retail, offices and restaurants is planned next to Chandler Fashion Center.

The project, called the Metropolitan of Chandler, is designed as an urban village to attract people who want to live, work and play in one spot.

The project, with 100,000 square feet of commercial space, is planned on 12 acres wrapping around the Windmill Inn, across from Nordstrom on the west side of the mall.

"It's very urban," said developer Spike Lawrence of Lawrence & Geyser, a Tempe firm. "Everyone uses the Kierland Commons comparison and I hate to do that, but it's residential over retail, and you drive down the middle of it."

The project, in partnership with Statesman Corp., will encompass 12 buildings from one to six stories tall, a pool, clubhouse, spa and upscale fashion boutiques. Lawrence said he is negotiating with "quality white-tablecloth restaurants which are exciting names new to the southeast Valley."

The project was approved last week by the city's Planning and Zoning Commission and will go to the City Council.

If approved by the council, the development will include 1,100 underground parking spaces, Lawrence said. Condos would range in size from 800 to 2,500 square feet and in price from $250,000 to $450,000. Most will be studios and one- and two-bedroom units.

Developers want to break ground this year and complete the project in two or three years.

Rosemarie Barton, a resident of the adjacent Hearthstone neighborhood west of the mall, said she is concerned about increased traffic and the impact of six-story buildings on Remuda Ranch, an eating-disorder treatment center to the south of the proposed project.

Barton, a real estate agent, expects the condo market to bounce back by the time these are built, but she is still lukewarm about the idea.

"I'm not aware of another project of this scale in these price ranges in Chandler," she said. "The closest was Elevation Chandler, which has not turned out the way it was promised to be. . . . I really think they're sticking their necks out with these types of prices."

Elevation Chandler, an eight-story hotel topped with two floors of luxury condominiums, has been stalled on the south side of the mall since April 2006, when the developer ran into financial trouble.

Christine Mackay, economic-development specialist for the city, said the Metropolitan project would give her a different class of companies to lure to Chandler.

It would be young technology companies with one to five employees who don't want to commute and who would like to live in the hub of social activity at Loop 101 and Chandler Boulevard.

"They want to be able to work 15, 16 hours a day and bring their dog from their house into the office and walk back for lunch," Mackay said.

"There's a whole thing called urban design for the creative class for live, work and play."

Lawrence & Geyser also has a previously announced Chandler project in the works called Downtown Ocotillo, a mixed-use development of retail, condos, restaurants and a hotel at Dobson and Queen Creek roads.
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  #30  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2007, 7:00 PM
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Well, the much talked-about condo tower project near Fiesta Mall has shrunk in height. Even so, this isn't a bad thing, since it shows that the developer is really thinking about the market, and not simply trying to flip the property. From the East Valley Tribune...


Project goes from towers to lofts in Mesa

Misty Williams, Tribune
A Chicago developer’s ambitious plan to build four condominium towers — rising as high as 25 stories — near Fiesta Mall in Mesa is shrinking.

Evanston, Ill.-based Roszak/ADC is now proposing a scaled-back project, called Fiesta Lofts, that would include 438 condos and 50,000 square feet of retail space in three connected low-rise buildings.

The buildings might be shorter, but the project isn’t much smaller than the original Fiesta Towers development that called for 540 condos, company president Thomas Roszak said.

Low rises will be “more market realistic in terms of being able to sell condos in Mesa for the appropriate price,” Roszak said.

That’s because the price of building high rises has nearly doubled in the past 12 months, he said. Condo developers across the Valley are rethinking tower projects, he said.

“You have to make the numbers work,” Roszak said. “You have to be market flexible.”

Located near the southeast corner of Alma School Road and Southern Avenue, the 4.9- acre property would have two, five-story buildings and a sixstory, U-shaped building. Each will have shops on the bottom floor with condos above.

Condo prices will range from $270,000 to $910,000, while sizes will range from studios to more than 2,000 square feet, Roszak said.

Community members and city officials hoped the original mixed-use development would be one in a number of recent projects, such as the Riverview shopping center and light rail, helping to revitalize west Mesa.

That hasn’t changed.

“I would rather have a smaller successful project there than a large unsuccessful project or no project at all,” said Dave Richins, executive director of the West Mesa Community Development Corp.

With a mall, community college and hospital, the Fiesta area is still a fantastic place for an investment like that, said Richins, who also sits on the city’s Design Review Board.

“As long as the quality’s there, I think the neighborhood’s going to be happy,” he said.

But some worry that the condos may never get built.

Mesa has a history of large projects being proposed but then being downsized or falling through, said local architect Rob Burgheimer, who also sits on the Design Review Board.

Burgheimer said he was skeptical of the original towers project, partly because the plans didn’t seemed tailored for Mesa but were better suited for a larger city like Chicago. He also worries the developer might flip the property for a profit.

Still, the architect said he’s all for economic development. People should be encouraged to take bold steps, as long as they give the city assurances that the projects will get done, Burgheimer said. “That’s still a good project if we can pull that thing off,” he said.

Roszak said the firm has been involved with the property for nearly three years and has every intention of following through with plans.

“We’ve never gone in and not done the development we intended to,” he said.

Construction could start this year with a marketing center set up by late summer or early fall, Roszak said. It will likely take two years to build.

Anybody would have acknowledged that modifications to the towers project were possible given the real estate market, Vice Mayor Claudia Walters said.

“Any developer is going to have to respond to changes in the marketplace,” she said.

Walters added that she’s still excited to get housing on land that’s been vacant for years.

The new plan, which was filed on Tuesday, will be evaluated, planning director John Wesley said. It seems to differ enough from the old that it will likely have to go through city approvals again.
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  #31  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2007, 7:35 AM
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Yay, TOD arrives in Mesa.


Mesa project plans spurred by light rail

Jim Walsh
The Arizona Republic
Apr. 18, 2007 12:00 AM
MESA - The city's past and future are merging in the first development planned to take advantage of Metro light-rail service.

West Main Station Village features a stucco and tile ramada similar to one used by Mesa's first train station when it opened in 1930, connecting Mesa to Phoenix by rail. It proposes to mix townhouses with shops on the site of a boat dealership moving to Bass Pro Shops.

"We're looking at it as definitely taking advantage of the light rail," architect Fred Woods said. "If the light rail wasn't there, we probably wouldn't be doing the project."

The project goes before the Mesa Planning and Zoning Board on Thursday for approval. Planners are recommending the board support a zoning change to allow higher density residential development. The City Council has final authority to grant zoning.

Tanya Collins, co-chairwoman of the Mesa Grande Community Alliance, said she hopes West Main Station Village will be successful, revitalizing west Mesa through light-rail service and its relatively close proximity to Tempe and Phoenix.

"I see it as a possible catalyst for projects similar to this," Collins said. "I think this is the first of many projects to employ a new design attitude. This is a great opportunity for developers to tag onto that."

The project features 56 townhomes and 13 shops at 1350 W. Main St., the current home of Tracker Marine and the former home of Randall's AMC, an automobile dealership for the defunct American Motors Corp. Tracker Marine is moving to Bass Pro Shops, scheduled to open sometime during the first week of June.

The property's owner is Dan Randall of Mulberry Business Park LLC. Woods said Randall's family has roots in Mesa dating to the 1940s and he wants to do something good for the community, in addition to making a good business decision.

"The easy thing would be just to get something else in there. He's definitely taking a risk, but he feels it should be a positive," Woods said of Randall. "We may be the first guinea pig out there."

The city is in the process of developing the Mesa Grande Area Plan to guide redevelopment along its 1-mile light-rail corridor, which could be lengthened to the east. The 20-mile rail line is scheduled open in December 2008 and end at Sycamore and Main Street, near the East Valley Institute of Technology.

The original Mesa rail depot was at Third Avenue and Robson Street, but it burned down in the 1980s, Woods said. The ramada duplicated by West Main Station Village was used by passengers as they waited for trains.
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  #32  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2007, 11:50 PM
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good to hear, that area could definitely use some revitalization.
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  #33  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 8:39 PM
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How is the Fiesta Towers, err, Lofts going to get 438 condos out of 5 and 6 story buildings, when they were only planning to have 540 condos in 20+ story buildings? Are the units all going to be smaller?
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  #34  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 6:00 PM
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2nd Waterfront tower on its way for June opening

Peter Corbett
Arizona Business Gazette
Apr. 26, 2007 12:00 AM
The Scottsdale Waterfront Residences welcomed the first residents in February in the 13-story western tower.

By June, residents should start to occupy the eastern tower, the one closer to Camelback and Scottsdale roads, said Geoffrey Edmunds, a development partner with Opus West.

The $240 million condo project is the most prominent landmark in downtown's redevelopment, which in recent years has brought more than $3 billion in public and private investment.
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The 198-unit luxury condo project takes its name from the Arizona Canal, which cuts across the site and its mix of shops, restaurants and offices.

A promenade along the canal, a bridge and plaza will create a new focal point for downtown.

Scottsdale Waterfront, Optima Camelview Village and other luxury condos opening downtown will bring a new tier of luxury residential living to the city.

Buyers at the Waterfront paid an average of $1.2 million for condos that rise 143 feet above a growing urban scene in a downtown Scottsdale that includes restaurants, nightclubs and a mix of local and national retailers.

The Waterfront's last few condos of 1,100 to 5,000 square feet were priced starting at $1.7 million each.

The condos generally match new Scottsdale homes in size, furnishings and amenities, with the exception of the yards and attached garages. Some have compared it with living in a Ritz-Carlton Hotel with a 3,500-square-foot condo instead of the standard room.

The Waterfront offers its residents an underground garage, valet parking, a concierge desk and business center.

The lofty pool deck has a zero-edge pool, a spa, gas barbecue grills and an outdoor kitchen.

Residents can work out in a fitness center above the lobby, then relax in the steam rooms in each of the locker rooms.

The Waterfront's club room, with its wood-plank floors and paneling, will be a gathering spot for residents that's also available for private functions, including catered meals and parties. It includes two dining rooms, a professional kitchen and a wine storage room with lockers for every resident.

A patio off the clubroom will look out onto a landscaped public area along the canal.

Waterfront residents will have perhaps Arizona's greatest selection of shopping at the doorstep, what with the adjacent shops and sprawling Scottsdale Fashion Square a stone's throw away.

They will be just across the canal from the new SouthBridge restaurant and retail project, which should be completed by fall. Developer Fred Unger plans to open the first of his three restaurants in May.

Plus, the shops and galleries of Fifth Avenue and Marshall Way are minutes away.

Downtown's expanding universe of nightlife has options for most tastes and ages.

Scottsdale Waterfront itself has a mix or residents ranging from their late 20s to 70s. Only one in five buyers was from out of state, according to Edmunds, the developer.

"These are people we built homes for previously," he said. "They trust us and didn't mind buying off blueprints."

Jeff Roberts, vice president of Opus West, said that the location and amenities attracted buyers.

"There was a clear demand for this style and quality of living," Roberts said.
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  #35  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 8:33 PM
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Shouldn't that go in the Scottsdale thread?
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  #36  
Old Posted May 10, 2007, 6:11 PM
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Plans reveal Mesa megaoasis
Jason Massad, Tribune

Quote:
When motorists enter Tempe from Loop 202, they cross a bridge straddling Tempe Town Lake — a local landmark. In Mesa, they speed past a sewage treatment plant.

Rich Adams, a Mesa planning commissioner, said he remembers years ago that former Mesa Mayor Wayne Brown wanted to see something replace the city’s eyesore.

“He just thought it was a really poor gateway for the city,” Adams said.

Scottsdale-based developer Waveyard LLC has proposed a new gateway to Mesa, a $250-million high-end resort that promises 10-story European themed buildings that would be built around a water park resort as early as 2010.

Mesa politicians and some neighborhood groups see the proposal as a signature development that could reap sales tax dollars for a cash-strapped city and spur community revitalization in west Mesa.

But Waveyard recently splashed down in the middle of the city’s political process, and questions have arisen.

The developers have not provided de- tailed traffic studies or a specific site plan. They also have not addressed how much of the project would be dedicated to residential development — a key concern for Mesa.

City officials say that’s normal for a project of this size. But the fate of Waveyard likely will be determined by voters in the November election, which was triggered by a proposed $20-million city incentive package that is tied to the development.

Perception of the project is important. Mesa Planning Commissioner Jared Langkilde this week wanted more details.

The proposed buildings of the project — a mix of hundreds of units of commercial, residential and office space — require special approvals. They would be some of the tallest buildings in Mesa.

“The materials are very conceptual,” Langkilde said. “We got black and white copies, and we couldn’t see some of the information.”

Neighbors living near the proposed Waveyard development say they have unanswered questions as well.

Nicole Macias, 26, lives in the Villagio development on Eighth Street. As a commuter, her main concern was the increase in traffic the development would bring to the area. Waveyard’s preliminary numbers indicate traffic on Eighth Street on the weekends could total 11,000 cars at peak hours. However, those numbers had no context, she said.

“They didn’t give us a basis of comparison,” Macias said. “Is it comparable to Chandler mall? Because Chandler mall is a pain in the butt to get to.”

The project’s supporters said some of the details are simply not possible to produce yet. Waveyard officials are simultaneously finalizing a development agreement with the city, working on the project and hosting community meetings to pitch Waveyard to voters.

“Voters are not going to go into the election blind,” said Emily Bittner, a spokeswoman for Waveyard. “We’re telling people pretty much as we go.”

Mesa’s Planning and Zoning Board will look at the project today. Board members expect to vote on land-use changes necessary to move the project forward on May 17. The City Council could give its final approval June 4.

Despite concerns, it seems the project has support at Mesa’s highest political levels.

“I think it’s just what the doctor ordered,” Langkilde said. “Mesa has an inferiority complex. This is a megaresort. It’s the right project for the right location, and that’s a rarity in this town.”

Waveyard development master plan

A WATER PARK
The centerpiece of the Waveyard development is an expansive water park that developers say would attract 1 million people in its first year. The outdoor recreation would include a man-made white-water river for kayaking and rafting, a wave pool for surfing, a large sandy beach, a scuba shack and a diving and snorkeling lagoon, plus a canyoneering area.

B RESORT
A 400-room resort-level hotel would include themed restaurants and a resort atmosphere that would “remove people from everyday life.” A nearly 3-acre indoor water park featuring slides and a lazy river is planned for guests of the resort.

C RETAIL/RESIDENTIAL
European-themed architecture and 10-story buildings would contain high-end retail stores, office and other commercial space. Residential units, including condominiums are also planned. About 5 acres would be dedicated to resort villas. Urban streetscapes, open plazas, shaded courtyards and boardwalks are planned to line the park’s water features.

D OFFICE/ RESIDENTIAL
A mix of 315 office and residential units are planned on 9 acres in the eastern portion of the resort.

E RIVERVIEW PARK
The 25-acre Riverview Park would be reconfigured as part of the development. Supporters say it wouldn’t shrink the size of the park and wouldn’t impede on a lake stocked with fish and the park’s playground equipment. SOURCES: Google Earth; Waveyard LLC
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  #37  
Old Posted May 10, 2007, 7:08 PM
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^ That would be a very interesting project were it to go through. We'll wait and see....

I went to Riverview (the mall) on Tuesday to see Spiderman 3. Good movie, the theatre (cinemark 16) gets two thumbs up - very clean, comfortable, very empty at the 10:45 showing. The mall actually looks pretty good, they have some kind of cool shade structures and benches down near the theatre. I would have like to have seen more green spaces in the interior, but overall I was impressed. I couldn't see anything else open other than the theatre, but it looked like a few things were getting close.
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  #38  
Old Posted May 11, 2007, 12:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combusean View Post
C RETAIL/RESIDENTIAL
European-themed architecture
Puke. Disneyland crap architecture, but I guess it is a theme park. I wish they'd go with super moden, desert appropriate, shade giving architecture. Phoenix is such a unique environment and we have small smatterings of amazing architecture here and there, I wish big projects would tap into that as well.
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  #39  
Old Posted May 11, 2007, 2:47 AM
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A sewage treatment may not be the greatest entrance to a city, but I always thought that particular one was pretty interesting looking.
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  #40  
Old Posted May 29, 2007, 9:56 PM
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When motorists enter Tempe from Loop 202, they cross a bridge straddling Tempe Town Lake — a local landmark. In Mesa, they speed past a sewage treatment plant.

Rich Adams, a Mesa planning commissioner, said he remembers years ago that former Mesa Mayor Wayne Brown wanted to see something replace the city’s eyesore.

“He just thought it was a really poor gateway for the city,” Adams said.
That treatment plant was only built in the last 6-7 years, long after Wayne Brown was mayor. Was there a different treatment plant there before, and the current version is just the expansion of that, or does this reporter not know what he's talking about?
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