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  #61  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2009, 3:33 AM
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Kind of related... Just discovered today that Prescott College offers 4-year residency bachelor's degrees, and then partial residency MAs and a PhD in sustainability education. It's private and seems to bear a similar appearance to something like University of Phoenix, Collins, or Apollo...

Anyone know anything about this school?

Here is an overview of the college:
https://www.collegedata.com/cs/data/...l?schoolId=718

And PC's website:
http://www.prescott.edu
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  #62  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2009, 11:19 AM
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http://www.azcentral.com/news/articl...leges0803.html

Quote:
ASU pushing for new 3-year college
Plan would cut cost of bachelor's degree by 40%
6 comments by Anne Ryman - Aug. 3, 2009 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic
Arizona State University wants to develop a network of lower-priced colleges where students could earn bachelor's degrees in just three years.

The Undergraduate Colleges @ ASU would offer only a handful of majors to let students fast-track their degrees through a combination of traditional and online courses, ASU President Michael Crow said.

The plan, which could cut the cost of a degree by about 40 percent, or $11,150, goes before the Arizona Board of Regents on Thursday for discussion, although the board won't vote until later this year.

ASU, like the two other state universities, is under increasing pressure from Arizona lawmakers to create more affordable options for higher education.

In-state tuition and fees at the state universities rose by up to 54 percent from 2004 to 2008, and rates are increasing sharply again this fall for new students at all three schools. At ASU's Tempe campus, for example, new students will pay $6,840 this fall, up from $5,659 last fall.

The Undergraduate Colleges @ ASU is one route the regents likely will consider. Other possibilities include allowing students to transfer more credits from community colleges and offering more online courses. At Thursday's regents meeting in Tempe, ASU's Crow, along with University of Arizona President Robert Shelton and Northern Arizona University President John Haeger, will present proposals for lower-cost degrees.

"What we're trying to offer are multiple options, multiple pathways," Crow said. "Families can pick the one that's best for them."

ASU officials want to open the first undergraduate college in fall 2010 in Maricopa County. Crow is looking at the West Valley, Phoenix and other locations, he said, but doesn't have a site yet. He confirmed that ASU is considering downtown Phoenix.

Eventually, ASU may have five to 15 undergraduate, commuter-style colleges spread throughout the state. Each college could serve 1,000 to 3,000 students. Faculty would focus on teaching, instead of a combination of teaching and research as they do on the main campuses.

ASU hopes to partner with cities to pick up the tab for construction costs, similar to what ASU did when developing the downtown Phoenix campus using a voter-approved sales tax.

Majors haven't been determined but likely would include only a handful of high-demand fields such as communication, elementary education, interdisciplinary studies, psychology, political science and criminology.

Students could fast-track their degrees by going to school year-round or by taking special assessment tests to move to the next level once they mastered the material. They still would need to complete the traditional 120 credit hours required for a degree. Crow said the quality of the education would be comparable to ASU's other campuses.

"This is not a knock-off product," he said.

The undergraduate campuses would be geared toward three-year degrees, but students could opt for the four-year route, which would cost more.

Tuition and fees at the Undergraduate Colleges @ ASU would be set at the maximum level of the federal Pell Grant, which is $5,350 a year, or about $1,500 less than what new students will pay at ASU's Tempe campus this fall.

Startup costs for the first campus are estimated at $4.5 million to $6 million. University officials admit the price tag could be a challenge given the state's budget crisis. One possible source of money is federal stimulus dollars.

Although three-year degrees are common in Europe, few U.S. students graduate in that time frame, primarily because the universities here follow the traditional two-semester schedule. Nationally, only 2.3 percent of students graduate in three years, according to the U.S. Department of Education. The figure is about half that at Arizona's three state universities.

Even so, three-year degrees are a growing trend. At least three private schools are introducing three-year degree options this fall: Hartwick College in Oneonta, N.Y., Lipscomb University in Nashville and Chatham University in Pittsburgh.

Ultimately, student interest will drive demand for three-year degrees, said Tony Pals, spokesman for the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

"I think those schools offering it will be watched closely," he said.
It continues to blow my mind the pressure ABOR seems to be putting on ASU to do everything. They want ASU to be a great research school and educate the masses which seems quite silly. I can't believe Crow hasn't snapped and gone on a spree of knocking them all over the head with mallets.

I'm not quite sure I even totally understand this plan. The part about them teaming with other cities is interesting. Are we going to end up with Bachelor only schools like "ASU Goodyear" and "ASU Apache Junction" or something? I'm all for some sort of system of city colleges, though it seems odd to keep them tied to ASU. If they were their own institutions (or perhaps their own system) it seems to me that theyd be able to act more effecively in pursuing grants, attracting students, etc and not be treated as a step child of ASUs.
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  #63  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2009, 8:32 AM
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More on new colleges:

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articl...ampus0831.html
Quote:
ASU wants Goodyear to build campus
But some city leaders wonder if investment would be wise
8 comments by Elias C. Arnold - Aug. 31, 2009 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic
Arizona State University wants a campus in Goodyear. The southwest Valley city wants a college presence.

But there's a caveat: ASU wants Goodyear to pay for the school.

The campus would be one of the Undergraduate Colleges @ ASU, the university's plan to offer lower-priced degrees in a handful of majors. ASU's pitch in Goodyear also is the first public effort to partner with an Arizona city on the new venture.


A high-ranking ASU official told city officials the school could pay for operations and maintenance, but Goodyear would need to build the teaching campus.

"Right now, our plan is that we would not undertake any of (the construction)," said David Young, senior vice president for academic affairs.

Under the Colleges @ ASU plan, students could earn four-year degrees in three years, cutting the cost by about 40 percent, or $11,150.

Lake Havasu City and Show Low also have expressed interest in such campuses. ASU President Michael Crow recently confirmed he was considering downtown Phoenix.

But the idea of shifting part of the financial burden to Goodyear could be a hurdle. Like other Valley cities battered by the recession, Goodyear is spread thin.

It resorted to raising taxes, including sales and hotel taxes, and tapping reserve funds to help close a $13.9 million budget gap for this fiscal year. On Tuesday, Goodyear's sales tax will rise from 2 percent to 2.5 percent.

Despite the depressed economy, the prospect of an ASU expansion in the All-American City by fall 2011 is no far-fetched dream.

"I think they're in a good process, and it's worth consideration," said Jack Lunsford, president and CEO of Westmarc, a coalition of civic and business leaders.

With the West Valley growing, it must plan for higher education now, Lunsford said. Goodyear's population has tripled since 2000, nearing 60,000, according to 2008 U.S. Census figures.

Offering college opportunities in the city has been a goal of Mayor Jim Cavanaugh for years.

A City Council meeting last week marked ASU's first public briefing after months of closed-door talks with local officials and other prospective universities.

ASU's formal interest in Goodyear - and need for funding - deviates from the higher-education model the city previously embraced: Private schools building their own campuses on land leased cheaply from the city.

The sole private university committed to Good- year so far also wants the largest state school involved.

"With ASU in the mix, I think this could be a model for the nation," said Raymond Van der Riet, vice president of strategic initiatives for Franklin Pierce University.

The New Hampshire-based college began teaching classes in Goodyear last year and has leased city land for a future campus. Van der Riet said ASU's proposal would accelerate Franklin Pierce's plans for a permanent campus. Franklin could reach build-out by 2017, four years earlier than planned, and full enrollment of nearly 1,100 students by 2018, almost eight years early.

In stark contrast, the University of the Incarnate Word left Goodyear because of ASU. The San Antonio-based school had started teaching classes in temporary facilities but backed out of its land lease in May, with school officials saying ASU's early signals that it wanted a Goodyear campus and the poor economy would make it too difficult to raise money to build their campus.

They thought ASU's brand was too strong to compete with. Incarnate Word is now part of the Communiversity @ Surprise, a newly opened one-stop learning center for higher education in the northwest Valley.

For its part, ASU envisions a network of five to 15 campuses around the state. Initial degrees could include business, education and social sciences.

The Arizona Board of Regents governs the state's three public universities and is redesigning the system to include more affordable options.

Young said ASU is under pressure to open some of those colleges in two years, so planning for one in Goodyear has to happen fast.

The ASU campus is projected to start with about 300 students in temporary facilities, requiring $3 million to $5 million from the city in short-term funding.

Over the long term, the school would need $35 million to $50 million from the city to build a campus for up to 5,000 students, Young said.

Cavanaugh, who has been instrumental in raising Goodyear's profile among Valley cities, is not willing to miss out on the opportunity.

"We have to find a way to get ASU here in 2011," he said.

But some city leaders don't want to be rushed to meet ASU's deadlines.

Councilman Rob Antoniak asked for more specifics about the economic advantages for Goodyear. He questioned whether students would use such a campus, given its proximity to ASU in downtown Phoenix. He also wondered if local residents paying the taxes to build the buildings could see a tuition discount.

Antoniak challenged ASU to show what would commit the university to Goodyear, beyond operating and maintenance funding that could be taken away by state lawmakers like other funds have.

Just a few months ago, the budget crunch hit ASU West, a satellite campus at 43rd Avenue and Thunderbird Road in Phoenix. Top administrators dissolved the business school, moved whole programs to other campuses and considered making it an undergraduate liberal-arts campus. Public outcry led them to restore some master's programs and bring some courses from the W.P. Carey School of Business to the campus.

ASU officials are confident the program they would implement in Goodyear would be on solid financial ground.

"We don't want to enter into an economically unviable situation," Young said. "Because I can guarantee you that, if we were to do this, ASU would be committing for the long term. You don't start a university campus and walk away from it."

Unlike a research institution like the main ASU campus in Tempe, the Colleges @ ASU program is designed to provide degrees in a limited set of disciplines, university spokeswoman Terri Shafer said.

"The state needs additional capacity in higher education, so there is no risk of overbuilding," she said. "We believe city, county and state government will find this to be a very cost-effective way to produce the skilled workforce that is needed for the Arizona economy, and we are comfortable that any commitment we make will be long-term in nature."

ASU now is working to establish a planning committee for the Goodyear campus. City staff plans to bring the proposal for council approval in September.
Im interested in that little comment about Downtown Phoenix. I assume this would just be something additional to the existing downtown campus? Its sort of confusing.

Either way I hope Goodyear has the vision to go through with this. Its kind of sad to say that the Mayor of Goodyear may be the elected official in the Valley with the most long term vision. While Id prefer a full blown system like the UC or Cal State system, this Colleges @ ASU thing may develop into that down the road. Im just glad we're getting some more choices for higher education in AZ, thats important indeed.
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  #64  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2009, 4:14 PM
Leo the Dog Leo the Dog is offline
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^^^ Agreed. The lack of higher education (public and private) options in this state is way behind the times for the current population it serves.
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  #65  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2009, 5:30 AM
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speaking of Private options, why is it seemingly impossible for a state of 6 million people to have 1, just 1, non-profit private university? How is it possible that this hasn't happened? (if it has happened, the school obviously isn't worth talking about). Is Apollo Group (U of Phx) behind this, or is it just that the era of new non-profit private universities is over?

That reminds me, when I worked for the state a while back, I met a man who worked on the board that had oversight of private universities in AZ, including the Apollo Group. He told me there were a total of 4 full time employees at this Board. Makes ya think just how much oversight the largest private for profit education company in the US has. 4 people to overlook a company of 14,500 people and 2.723 billion in revenue. Of course they aren't the only ones looking at U of Phx.
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  #66  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2009, 5:38 AM
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^I think its a combination of a couple of things. Phoenix sadly lacks any wealthy philanthropists that would found such a school. The ones we've had historically did nice things like the Heards but even they were only part time residents. Theres no Vanderbuilt, Carnegie, etc. of Phoenix, thus no one to found a school.

Secondly since the Salt River Valley was so sparsely populated in the days (pre great depressing) when people were founding great universities, no one bothered to found one here. I imagine trying to start one now would have ridiculously prohibitive costs.

Also Im not sure if theres anyway to prove this but it seems like modern philanthropists just have different priorities. The industrialists era guys built universities, libraries and museums. Today billionaires give money to foundations, over seas aid, medical research, etc. Not that one is superior to the other, but the latter seems more in vogue today for whatever reason. Perhaps because people feel like the more infrastructure type things have already been covered.

Last edited by HooverDam; Sep 1, 2009 at 7:44 AM.
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  #67  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2009, 1:08 PM
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This "Colleges at ASU" concept is so stupid and won't fly in today's economy if ASU expect cities to foot the bill. The 2006 bond passage that funded ASU downtown was a sheer product of the boom, one of the lasting impressions of such irrational exhuberance. To think Phoenix could pull off such a huge investment yet again to expand the campus beyond its current scope is all but out of the question. Goodyear is obviously in the same boat.

Just let the community colleges offer 4 year degrees already!
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  #68  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2009, 5:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combusean View Post

Just let the community colleges offer 4 year degrees already!
Yep. I agree. There was serious talk of that some time ago. Don't know what happened to that plan.

Although, I think not all of the community colleges in Maricopa county should be converted into 4 year schools. Just a few of them. Good candidates would be GCC, SCC, and MCC. Estrella Mountain CC might be a good choice too.
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  #69  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2009, 9:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combusean View Post
This "Colleges at ASU" concept is so stupid and won't fly in today's economy if ASU expect cities to foot the bill. The 2006 bond passage that funded ASU downtown was a sheer product of the boom, one of the lasting impressions of such irrational exhuberance. To think Phoenix could pull off such a huge investment yet again to expand the campus beyond its current scope is all but out of the question. Goodyear is obviously in the same boat.

Just let the community colleges offer 4 year degrees already!
Im not against some of the CCs maybe offering 4 year degrees of graduating one or two of them (GCC and MCC probably) into 4 year state schools, but I think its silly to totally dismiss the Colleges at ASU plan.

Both the Goodyear Mayor and West Valley businessmen seem to think it can work, and I'd assume/hope they know more about the finances of Goodyear than you or I. Goodyears sales tax numbers are still pretty average compared to other Valley cities, they could perhaps do another slight raise there to help cover costs for the college (which would pay off in the long run) or find some other ways to cover the costs.

I find it interesting that Lake Havasu City and Snowflake have expressed interest. If it costs at least $35M to start a campus for 5K students I wonder how those smaller cities would be able to afford it. I guess Lake Havasu City is about the same size as Goodyear but I doubt its growing as fast, nor is it connected to a major metro like Goodyear. The Goodyear campus would obviously draw students from around the S.W. Valley. It seems like Yuma, Prescott, or suburban Valley cities would maybe be better fits than Snowflake.

Anyway, Ive got major respect for this Goodyear mayor. He seems to be working hard to make sure his city isn't just another forgettable blob like so many other Valley suburbs. Between their well thought out plans for their future Downtown, attracting the two Ohio teams for spring training and bringing in Higher Education with Franklin Pierce and ASU the guy at the very least seems to have a vision.
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  #70  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2010, 7:58 AM
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Damn, I know that this thread has been dead for a while but I just want to say how much it PISSES THE FUCK out of me that I have to go to law school out of state in order to get a good job IN ARIZONA. Its like the state is doing everything it can to ensure that I end up elsewhere. This is just idiotic.
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  #71  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2010, 8:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HooverDam View Post
when people were founding great universities, no one bothered to found one here. I imagine trying to start one now would have ridiculously prohibitive costs.
Hardly prohibitive. CA recently founded UC Merced. In 2004 "the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) approved a memorandum of understanding between ASU and the University of Arizona (UA) to create the Phoenix Biomedical Campus of the Arizona University System" (Source: http://www.asu.edu/news/research/bio...onf_082704.htm ). This amounts to starting a new medical school even though they are apparently going to glom onto the existing one at U of AZ (saves having to try to get a new accreditation I imagine). And starting a new med school is a lot harder than starting a new law school because of the need to have clinical facilities (i.e. a teaching HOSPITAL).
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  #72  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2010, 8:58 AM
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Since this is revived ... what is the problem with letting the CC's all offer four year degrees or at least having some arbitrary specialization almost like it exists now...eg, the EMT program at MCC is actually competitive. No love for my alma mater Phoenix College even?

There should be at least two places to get a 4 year degree in the Maricopa system alone in fields they currently offer.
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  #73  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2010, 3:57 PM
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tigerbears

I'm not sure why you feel you HAVE to go to law school out of state. One of the few good things you can say about AZ higher ed is that is has 2 good law schools, 3 good business schools (Thunderbird rocks) and a good medical school (could one become 2). If what you are saying is that it would be nice to have some more less selective schools like California Western, then you are right.
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  #74  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2010, 10:19 PM
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^ Lulz, I am saying quite the opposite. Its too easy to start a law school but very very difficult to acquire the faculty needed for a truely uselful one. Have you looked at the placement stats out of ASU Law, they are abysmal. I know several recent graduates who are funemployed and many more who are working for penuts. Basicaly, the good jobs go to the top 5% at ASU and the top 10% at U of A (I don't know anything about Phoenix College of Law but I immagine that things are even worse there). This was true even in a good economy. I wish U of A was more like Texas, Michigan, or Virginia and could provide a reasonable chance of employment upon graduation. This is why I am saying that I have to go to law school out of state in order to have a reasonable prospect of getting hired by a firm here.

I think that the only law school started recently that was even OK was UC Irvine's and thats just because they have buckets and buckets of money to pay good students to attend and faculty to teach there.

Last edited by trigirdbers; Feb 14, 2010 at 10:31 PM.
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  #75  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2010, 9:13 PM
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^^^I'd love to see Don's take on this post.
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  #76  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2010, 11:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trigirdbers View Post
^ Lulz, I am saying quite the opposite. Its too easy to start a law school but very very difficult to acquire the faculty needed for a truely uselful one. Have you looked at the placement stats out of ASU Law, they are abysmal. I know several recent graduates who are funemployed and many more who are working for penuts. Basicaly, the good jobs go to the top 5% at ASU and the top 10% at U of A (I don't know anything about Phoenix College of Law but I immagine that things are even worse there). This was true even in a good economy. I wish U of A was more like Texas, Michigan, or Virginia and could provide a reasonable chance of employment upon graduation. This is why I am saying that I have to go to law school out of state in order to have a reasonable prospect of getting hired by a firm here.

I think that the only law school started recently that was even OK was UC Irvine's and thats just because they have buckets and buckets of money to pay good students to attend and faculty to teach there.
Where are you getting this from? According to ASU's website:

Quote:
99% placement rate nine months after graduation
Average starting salary:
Public sector: $54,000
Private sector: $100,000
source: http://www.law.asu.edu/?id=505

6 figure starting salary in Phoenix sounds pretty good to me... especially since it's relatively cheap and they offer incredible scholarships if you're half way qualified (no massive loans = no need to work 80 hours a week just to make loan payments). Forget law school, what career in Phoenix has a 6 figure average starting salary? Remember that stats at other schools will be inflated by the fact that average salaries are higher in general in most other big cities.
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  #77  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2010, 10:10 PM
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A more specific breakdown of ASU Law class of 2008, 12 months after graduation:

Quote:
Type of Employment
Private Practice 53%
Government 17%
Judicial Clerkships 7%
Business 10%
Public Interest 9%
Academic 3%

Employment Location
Employed in state 73%
Employed out of state 27%


Average Salaries
All Graduates $77,500
Private Sector $100,000
Public Sector $54,000
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  #78  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2010, 11:24 PM
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And this is why innocent 22 year olds are tricked into paying full tuition for poor quality schools. All of these type of statistic are based on self reporting. Typically only students with jobs (and high paying ones at that) self report. If you want to double check to make sure I'm not just trolling against ASU, just go and ask any current student at the school if these numbers seem at all accurate to them - or go and look at what the reporting rate was for this survey. Hell, just run these numbers by Don. Trust me, if I had a reasonable chanse at 6 figures at ASU, I would not be going back east for school.
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  #79  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2010, 3:17 AM
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Thanks for the info.
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  #80  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2011, 7:03 PM
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Originally Posted by azcats View Post
ASU is NOT building a med school in downtown Phoenix. The UofA is.
I don't think anyone on this site confused UA's new med school downtown for an ASU venture. However, there has been talk of a future ASU School of Medicine in partnership with Mayo; perhaps someone mentioned the downtown Bio Med Campus as an ideal location for it?

Thanks for taking the time to call RED and getting some answers; the apartment question has been brought before but no one was quite sure if it was more than a rumor. I think most on this site are cynical about the apartments atop Palomar due to numerous projects downtown that have been shelved or canceled over the years...not to mention the consistent scaling back of CityScape's footprint and height.
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