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  #61  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
I admit to not knowing all that much about Sherbrooke but was under the impression that Lennoxville was somewhat removed from Sherbrooke despite being part of the Sherbrooke CMA. Is this not correct?
Lennoxville is included in the city of Sherbrooke since the municipal mergers of 2001. It's never been removed. Although, symbolically, the new city of Sherbrooke made Lennoxville a borough, though having a population of only 5500.
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  #62  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post


What! Bishop's will be in AUS? What was the rationale for that?
They found a nice way to say it, but the reality is they're tired of being blown out by the big teams like Laval and UMontréal that have a more big-time approach to football. The AUS universities have a different philosophy and feel than what is going on in RSEQ wrt to football.
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  #63  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
An interesting fact about the small town eastern Canadian universities is that they have recently banded together the form the "Maple League of Canadian Universities". http://mapleleague.ca/

The charter members are:
- Bishops (Lennoxville QC)
- Mount Allison (Sackville NB)
- Acadia (Wolfville NS)
- Saint FX (Antigonish NS)

They seem to be trying to define themselves within the Canadian university context, dominated as it is by large provincial universities based in the major Canadian cities. This is an interesting initiative, and it will be interesting to see if any other similar universities will try to join this group (Trent for example).

As for the culture of small university towns, the focus tends to be around the university, especially for sports, and it is interesting to note in these four particular cases just how important the university football teams are to their respective communities.

I can speak to Sackville since it is less than 50 km from Moncton, and I tend to go down to the football games whenever I can. It isn't just the student body who comes out to these games, it's the whole damned town. Everyone is wearing garnet & gold colours (usually a scarf), there is a pep band playing in the stands, everyone is standing around socializing and watching the game. It's like a scene out of the 1950's. The atmosphere is terrific!

It's interesting that this year Bishops is transferring from the Quebec Conference to the AUS, joining it's Maple League brethren and Saint Mary's University. It will be interesting to see how this pans out........
There's not really anything like Sackville or Wolfville here.

In St. John's, the presence of students is highly visible - for example, they account for most of the city's visible minority population and, especially during the winter months, almost every come-from-away. But there's no dominant atmosphere created by students. Most of them are still rural Newfoundlanders and blend in well. When students, say, crowd George Street, it still feels like it's crawling with locals, not visitors.

Corner Brook feels a bit more like a college town given the relative size of the Sir Wilfred Grenfell campus of Memorial University. The fine arts students, especially, seem to have a huge impact on the city's daily life.

Our public college, College of the North Atlantic, has 17 campuses across Newfoundland and one in Doha, Qatar. That can lead to some towns feeling vaguely like college towns. I, for example, studied journalism in Stephenville. Stephenville felt like a college town to me because that was my only connection to it - everyone I met there was from elsewhere in Newfoundland, studying. When we went to a bar like the 104, students from elsewhere were the largest group and set the tone, etc.

But it's (not specifically Stephenville, but CNA campuses generally) lower class, more modern, less established, etc. These towns don't have the weight of a Sackville or Wolfville, and their campuses feel like remote work camps rather than historic universities.
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  #64  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 4:55 PM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
I admit to not knowing all that much about Sherbrooke but was under the impression that Lennoxville was somewhat removed from Sherbrooke despite being part of the Sherbrooke CMA. Is this not correct?
It's a neighborhood of Sherbrooke, and it's one of the most accessible areas of the city from downtown Sherbrooke (from the corner of Wellington and Aberdeen, squarely in downtown Sherbrooke, the very next traffic light is the intersection at the center of Lennoxville when you drive south. It's a matter of minutes).

In the 1800s, Sherbrooke's urban streetcar system had three lines, one of which was serving Lennoxville from downtown Sherbrooke. I doubt that if Halifax had a small streetcar system, there would be one of its three lines serving Wolfville...?
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  #65  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 5:59 PM
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Educational attainment for pre-amalgamation Kingston and Halifax:

Kingston:

University degree: 36.1%
Postgraduate: 21.2%

Halifax:

University degree: 44.3%
Postgraduate: 17.3%
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  #66  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 6:45 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
It's a neighborhood of Sherbrooke, and it's one of the most accessible areas of the city from downtown Sherbrooke (from the corner of Wellington and Aberdeen, squarely in downtown Sherbrooke, the very next traffic light is the intersection at the center of Lennoxville when you drive south. It's a matter of minutes).

In the 1800s, Sherbrooke's urban streetcar system had three lines, one of which was serving Lennoxville from downtown Sherbrooke. I doubt that if Halifax had a small streetcar system, there would be one of its three lines serving Wolfville...?
Yup. Lennoxville is very much a part of Sherbrooke now. Even if it was its own city back then, the Lennoxville borough is now fully integrated within the city, and new highway nearby certainly helps.
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  #67  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2017, 7:57 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
There's not really anything like Sackville or Wolfville here.

In St. John's, the presence of students is highly visible - for example, they account for most of the city's visible minority population and, especially during the winter months, almost every come-from-away. But there's no dominant atmosphere created by students. Most of them are still rural Newfoundlanders and blend in well. When students, say, crowd George Street, it still feels like it's crawling with locals, not visitors.

Corner Brook feels a bit more like a college town given the relative size of the Sir Wilfred Grenfell campus of Memorial University. The fine arts students, especially, seem to have a huge impact on the city's daily life.

Our public college, College of the North Atlantic, has 17 campuses across Newfoundland and one in Doha, Qatar. That can lead to some towns feeling vaguely like college towns. I, for example, studied journalism in Stephenville. Stephenville felt like a college town to me because that was my only connection to it - everyone I met there was from elsewhere in Newfoundland, studying. When we went to a bar like the 104, students from elsewhere were the largest group and set the tone, etc.

But it's (not specifically Stephenville, but CNA campuses generally) lower class, more modern, less established, etc. These towns don't have the weight of a Sackville or Wolfville, and their campuses feel like remote work camps rather than historic universities.
Stephenville recently commissioned a study/plan into developing, as council called it, "the college town concept". A consultant was hired in the fall and I'm interested to see what comes out of it in the end, at the very least we might get something that will help toward developing a proper campus instead of a smattering of buildings and sites all over town and maybe open a couple of new initiatives/routes for economic development.
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  #68  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2018, 11:11 PM
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Looking at the Ontario election results, it's interesting to see the "university town liberalism" of Kingston extend into the exurban areas (for example the NDP won not only old Kingston Township but also Loyalist Township in Lennox and Addington, while the Liberals won the Frontenac Islands!) But then Guelph pretty much goes into a deep blue PC territory right outside the city limits and Wellington County as a whole went PC in spite of the Greens taking Guelph.

Last edited by Docere; Aug 8, 2018 at 11:25 PM.
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  #69  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2018, 1:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Boris2k7 View Post
I went to a college campus in Lawrencetown, NS. The place is only a small village so the students made up around 50% of the population.
Weird. All his time I didn't know there was a fully autonomous town called Lawrencetown. All I knew about was the rural beach community on the edge of Greater Halifax, famous locally for surfing.
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  #70  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2018, 7:13 PM
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Wolfville NS 8.1%
Sackville NB 5.1%
Waterloo ON 4.2%
Kingston ON 3.2%
Guelph ON 2.5%
Fredericton NB 2%
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  #71  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2018, 2:41 AM
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Not sure if anyone from Saskatchewan has mentioned any college towns in the Province so here's an introduction to St Peter's College in Muenster, SK.

St Peter's College, founded by the Benedictine monks of St. Peter’s Abbey a hundred years ago & affiliated to U of S, offers a full first year of Arts and Sciences classes and senior classes in several disciplines. Annual full-time enrollment is limited to 150 students.

Muenster, SK has population of 450, but is located just east of Humboldt, SK with 6,000 people.

https://www.stpeterscollege.ca/


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muenster,_Saskatchewan
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  #72  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2018, 9:00 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
It's like a scene out of the 1950's. The atmosphere is terrific!
I had a very different experience there. It was sort of like a scene out of the 1950s I guess.

My only real experience on Mt. A campus was for a rugby game during homecoming, about 8 years ago (I played for King's College for a couple years).

The opposing team were all great guys, we partied with them afterwards, I'm still friends with a few of them actually (although the ones I'm thinking of, I knew before that game).

The fans were absolutely horrible. I'll never know if it was limited to this one game, or their rugby games, or their non-football games, or whatever, but there were quite a few younger, intoxicated fans at the front of the bleachers yelling racist and homophobic slurs at our players for the entire duration of the game (80 minutes). I don't mean generic things like "You King's f****** are all a bunch of f******" or whatever. I mean anyone on my team who wasn't white endured 80 minutes of pointed racial slurs directed solely at them, anyone who was (for whatever reason) assumed to be non-heterosexual got it pretty bad too. No one asked any of these people to leave. No one even asked them to tone it down a little. They did this for the entire duration of the game. And nobody did ANYTHING about it.

Sure you can say they were just passionate fans trying to get in the players' heads. Maybe that's "all" it was. But I've never witnessed anything like that before (or since) in person. We played against SMU, Dal (our biggest rival), STFX, Acadia, UPEI, NSAC, CBU, St. Thomas and I think UNB at one point. Never experienced anything like it at those schools. Got taunted as "Frodo" once at SMU (I'm fairly short). That was it though. The experience at Mt. A left a sour taste that I still can't really shake. I wasn't on the receiving end of any of the worst taunts (my avatar may be a bit misleading here... I'm a "visible minority" only in the most technical sense) but I was deeply ashamed that such behaviour was being openly tolerated in the Maritimes, and coming from students at a reasonably prestigious university no less.

I genuinely hope that was just an exceptionally bad night, and the student body is not usually like that. Or that maybe things have changed in the years since then.
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  #73  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2018, 9:24 AM
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Halifax-as-a-whole is a bit too much of a jack-of-all-trades city to really have a college town vibe, but the universities do have a major influential presence here. Almost all of them are concentrated in the South End, so that part of the city does have (what I assume to be) a distinct "college town" vibe (having never been to any of these American college towns, I admit). A very large percentage of the people living there are students (and a large percentage of these being from outside NS) or otherwise affiliated with the universities. In Ontario the area between Chebucto Rd and South St would probably be considered a "student ghetto" - there's an aversion to using the word "ghetto" here in this way due to the fact that historically we've had "actual" ghettoes (some would say that we still do - there are still some communities on the eastern edge of Dartmouth that would fit many definitions of "ghetto" in the traditional sense). Other than the universities and hospitals there isn't really anything else going on in this area, and a large percentage of businesses cater mostly to students (in many cases, international students). University residences are integrated into non-university streetscapes. The South End is also poorly connected to the rest of the metro area (other than Downtown, which is adjacent). Traffic (pedestrian, vehicular, transit, cyclists) in and around the South End is very much tied to the school day/year.

I have a feeling that if a tourist who is more familiar with the concept of college towns than I am were dropped in South End Halifax, they would describe it as a college town (or at least collegetownesque) but once they leave the Peninsula, or reach the North End, they'd probably change their minds.


It's also hard to explain to someone who has never been there how dominated Wolfville and Antigonish are by their respective universities. Again I've never been to Ithaca, Ann Arbor, etc. but I'd consider these both quintessential college towns, if only in a Canadian (or Maritimes + New England) way. Obviously neither of them are exactly like Ann Arbor, which is about 50x larger than either of them. They're also not "like Dresden ON, but also there happens to be a university there" though. The universities are the towns' raison d'etre. And the students do call people "townies". And a lot of the townies get sick of all the students (most of whom are not local). Etc.
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  #74  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2018, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by FFX-ME View Post
Antigonish
Fredericton
Guelph
Halifax
Kingston
Sackville
Sherbrooke
Squamish
Wolfville
Kelowna

To claim a large city is a college town is ridiculous. These are typically cities where not only student population is important but where the university is the main industry.

Most "real" college towns in Canada are east of Ontario and mainly in the maritimes.
Maybe Hearst (Université de Hearst) if enrollment grew a bit!
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  #75  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2018, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
I had a very different experience there. It was sort of like a scene out of the 1950s I guess.

My only real experience on Mt. A campus was for a rugby game during homecoming, about 8 years ago (I played for King's College for a couple years).

The opposing team were all great guys, we partied with them afterwards, I'm still friends with a few of them actually (although the ones I'm thinking of, I knew before that game).

The fans were absolutely horrible. I'll never know if it was limited to this one game, or their rugby games, or their non-football games, or whatever, but there were quite a few younger, intoxicated fans at the front of the bleachers yelling racist and homophobic slurs at our players for the entire duration of the game (80 minutes). I don't mean generic things like "You King's f****** are all a bunch of f******" or whatever. I mean anyone on my team who wasn't white endured 80 minutes of pointed racial slurs directed solely at them, anyone who was (for whatever reason) assumed to be non-heterosexual got it pretty bad too. No one asked any of these people to leave. No one even asked them to tone it down a little. They did this for the entire duration of the game. And nobody did ANYTHING about it..
Sorry you had such a poor experience, but you don't encounter such an atmosphere at a MTA Mounties football game.

There are a lot of paying customers at the football games. At least half those in attendance are "townies" from Sackville, or from Moncton. There are often lots of kids in attendance, including minor football teams on an outing. Campus police are everywhere and drinking is not tolerated. The crowds can be boisterous, but there is little profanity and no slurs (that I've heard) are shouted. Students in attendance are pretty well behaved.

I imagine the fans at the rugby game were considerably fewer, predominantly male, jockish and alcohol may have been involved. Was there any campus security?
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  #76  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2018, 8:13 AM
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I don't remember seeing any campus security. It was homecoming week, so they may have been occupied with other things.
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