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  #41  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2018, 1:51 AM
isaidso isaidso is online now
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Originally Posted by GernB View Post
Just Maine....remove that hump that separates NB from QC!
It's one of those irritating bits of geography from a Canadian's perspective. The Northwest Angle, Point Roberts (jutting south of metro Vancouver), and the Alaska panhandle are the others. Too bad we didn't have a BC panhandle going the other way all the way up the Pacific coast to the Aleutian Islands.
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  #42  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2018, 2:38 AM
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Canadian Expansion

Following political turmoil in Europe, St. Pierre and Miquelon (population 15K) vote to secede from France and join Canada as the 11th province. This demand for provincial status was partially intended to maintain their French language and culture as distinct from that of nearby Newfoundland and Labrador, and partially because of their distance from Quebec and the Maritimes. This passes the incredibly difficult process of admitting a new Canadian province as referenda across the country show voters largely in favour of the idea, and all political parties take note. The territories become provinces in turn for their support of admitting SP&M, with NWT (60K) becoming renamed as the province of Aurora.

British Overseas Territories follow suit, with Bermuda (100K), the Virgin Islands (50K) and the Turks and Caicos (50K) all becoming provinces as well. Instead of appending 'Canadian' instead of 'British' to the Virgin Islands, they become renamed Tortola. Following further devastation by category 6 hurricanes (new category!), several other island nations join, but because of their risk to natural disaster, they join together as a single province, Caribe (200K).

Bahamas (500K) and Barbados (350K), interested in this sudden conglomeration of North American territories, vote to join Canada titled not as provinces, but as internal countries, similar to Scotland and Wales in the UK. Quebec (13M) is granted status as a country within a country at this time upon this condition. However, the powers of the provinces are comparable to those of the constituent countries. Again, the national mood is favourable to this hemispherical consolidation.

Although these changes of status were easy to pass due to national popularity, future secessionist movements would conversely prove more difficult. It was easier to join than to leave. Toronto remains within Ontario, and Labrador remains within Newfoundland and Labrador. However, Nunatsiavut and Inuvialuit become more autonomously governed territories within their respective provinces of Yukon and Newfoundland and Labrador, or possibly join the province of Nunavut.

The population of this Canada is 68 million.


Freedom of Movement

Free trade is strengthened by the addition of freedom of movement arrangements between Canada and Australia, New Zealand, and the EFTA (Switzerland, Norway, Liechtenstein, Iceland, and the UK, which was admitted in 2020 following Brexit).

Constitutional Monarchy Maintained but Elected

Following the death of Queen Elisabeth in 2030 (long live the queen), several Commonwealth realms voted on the succession order. This was seen as a response to conflicting national opinion on maintaining a foreign monarchy, especially given the relative unpopularity and advanced age of Prince Charles. It was also preferable to becoming a presidential republic given the autocratic tendencies of several of the world's presidents during this time. Further, it was also seen as the legal path of least resistance, and only required a national referendum and subsequent vote from the Privy Council. This created multiple new monarchies splitting the House of Windsor, with Savannah (daughter of the queen's grandson Peter Phillips and Montreal-born Autumn Kelly) elected Queen of Canada, Harry elected King of Australia and New Zealand, and William as King of Great Britain. The role of Governor General has been maintained, with the position granted upon advice from the prime minister, and the monarchy maintains a purely symbolic and apolitical role.

[This last 'prediction' could also be that Canada, Australia and New Zealand did indeed become republics, but maintained a separation of roles and powers between prime ministers (heads of government) and presidents (cultural figureheads but also a hand on the levers of power to prevent slides into authoritarianism). Perhaps an entirely new name was given to this presidential or governor general role, such as chancellor, grand chief, or something entirely new. Perhaps, even, the title king or queen was maintained but was an elected Canadian-born person, and the terms were somehow longer than a prime minister, but not for life. Every 8-12 years?]

Last edited by Alegan; Aug 5, 2018 at 2:50 AM.
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  #43  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2018, 3:36 PM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
balletomane probably has the most accurate guess of what Canada's Provincial & CMA populations will be in 2067, although I doubt Alberta's population outside of Calgary/Edmonton will drop as he predicts.

Saskatoon & Regina's grew the fastest in 2017 and they are consistently among the fastest growing cities in Canada.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Echoes
Saskatoon, Regina led national growth rate in 2017
Statistics Canada says Saskatoon grew by 2.8%, Regina grew by 2.4%

Saskatoon's population was estimated at 323,800 people,
while Regina's was estimated at 253,200.

CBC News Posted: Feb 13, 2018 11:20 AM CT| Last Updated: Feb 13, 2018 11:20 AM CT

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...rate-1.4533264

One of the biggest changes we could see in Canada besides the direct human modification of the environment, is the country's climate & the direct effects of this climate change in Canada.

The World's & Canada's weather is getting warmer on average each decade. BC and Saskatchewan have each already gotten +39/40°C temps this Summer and typically do have these temps each year & eastern half of the country have had unprecedented record breaking temps for Summer 2018.

Warmer World temps can mean drier or moister weather in certain areas plus more polar vortexes in Winter in Ontario & Quebec because of changing weather patterns forcing colder air in certain places.

Severe Weather like Tornadoes may become even more common in the Canadian Prairies with Tornado Alley shifting further & further North and starting earlier each year.

you can see the expanding range of Tornadoes in places like the Dakota's and Montana just even in the last 2 to 3 decades.





https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/man-de...toba-1.4040722






^^ in addition to warmer temperatures and Tornado alley shifting further North, Forest fires will plague Western North America with increasing frequency.

In Canada this week Moose Jaw, SK with 42½°C recorded the highest temperature in Canada since 2007 when Woodrow, Sask recorded 43°C.

I was in California and Nevada earlier this month and places like Death Valley broke it's previous record of hottest place on the planet.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.9921c0a70ad1

In 2018, California has had unprecedented wildfires with over 2000 homes burnt already this year, & we are just entering in wildfire season in California.

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/video/t...-1295514179739
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  #44  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2018, 2:12 AM
isaidso isaidso is online now
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We usually view the northern reaches of the prairie where the grain belt stops but the prairie actually spreads all the way to the Arctic Ocean. With temperatures rising, especially in the north, will we start growing wheat as far north as Yellowknife? Maybe the grain belt will stretch even further north than that.


Courtesy of marvinlyphysicalregions
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  #45  
Old Posted Today, 7:41 PM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
We usually view the northern reaches of the prairie where the grain belt stops but the prairie actually spreads all the way to the Arctic Ocean. With temperatures rising, especially in the north, will we start growing wheat as far north as Yellowknife? Maybe the grain belt will stretch even further north than that.
^^I could imagine the Canadian Grain Belt stretching further north, with agbiotech developing strains of crop that are suitable for growing in newer agriculture areas of Canada.

With Climate Change likely to accelerate, warmer temperatures are definitely on the horizon. Part of the climate change scenario though is that there are more extremes in weather.

Just in the last few days, Regina recorded not only it's hottest August temperature at +41.3°C but also came within one degree of recording it's coldest August 14th nighttime temp in history with +2.5°C & this is since records started in 1884. These extremes in temperatures have an affect on growing season particularly as more areas of agriculture open up further North.
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  #46  
Old Posted Today, 7:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GernB View Post
Just Maine....remove that hump that separates NB from QC!
This is probably one of my favourite alternative Canadian history angles. The Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842 determined the border between the United States and the British North America colonies:


Wikipedia

The red dotted line was the British claim during the negotiations. The green line is what we eventually got. Having this extra Northern Maine land doesn't directly change much ecnomically but it does provide for a larger corridor between the Maritimes and Quebec and allows for more direct access to markets like Quebec City and Montreal, which would have most certainly made trade with Canada much easier on the Maritime provinces when Confederation was achieved two decades later.

As an example, the current distance from Fredericton to Quebec City today is roughly 531km via Route 2, Route 185/85, and Route 20. A theoretical highway from the same starting point that cuts through from Florenceville-Bristol to Sainte-Justine/Lac-Etchemin and onto Quebec City is 429km, or roughly 100 fewer km.
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  #47  
Old Posted Today, 10:57 PM
saffronleaf saffronleaf is online now
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
This is probably one of my favourite alternative Canadian history angles. The Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842 determined the border between the United States and the British North America colonies:


Wikipedia

The red dotted line was the British claim during the negotiations. The green line is what we eventually got. Having this extra Northern Maine land doesn't directly change much ecnomically but it does provide for a larger corridor between the Maritimes and Quebec and allows for more direct access to markets like Quebec City and Montreal, which would have most certainly made trade with Canada much easier on the Maritime provinces when Confederation was achieved two decades later.

As an example, the current distance from Fredericton to Quebec City today is roughly 531km via Route 2, Route 185/85, and Route 20. A theoretical highway from the same starting point that cuts through from Florenceville-Bristol to Sainte-Justine/Lac-Etchemin and onto Quebec City is 429km, or roughly 100 fewer km.
Ideally they'd just go straight across on the 45th line.
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