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  #11461  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2018, 5:43 PM
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Originally Posted by saffronleaf View Post
England = 53m
Southern Ontario = 12.8m
The Maritimes = 1.8m
Not that it makes much difference, but according to latest estimates, Southern Ontario would be somewhere well past 13.5 million by now.
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  #11462  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2018, 3:35 AM
SaskOttaLoo SaskOttaLoo is offline
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Originally Posted by saffronleaf View Post
- Only 30% of Australia's exports go to China. 75% of our exports go to the US.

- Look at this cost-of-living comparison: yes, rent in Sydney is 20-25% higher but wages are 35% lower in Toronto. If you dive into the numbers, Sydney, on account of much higher wages, is more affordable than Toronto. https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-livin...&city2=Toronto

- From my cursory look, I think mining contributes a similar percentage to Australia's GDP that O&G does to Canada's.

Interesting articles about Australia's high GDP growth rate and 25+ years of no recession. They point out flaws but doesn't seem as doom and gloom.

https://www.economist.com/the-econom...ut-a-recession

https://www.economist.com/the-econom...conomic-growth

Well, from my reading I tend to think that Australia's economy is even worse-off than Canada's. See this link for a very long, in-depth and well-written analysis of the problems with Australia's economy: https://medium.com/@matt_11659/matt-...s-6877adb3fb2f

In essence, it has largely de-industrialized and relies on a property boom and natural resources. Well it could be easily argued that Canada has too, Australia has taken it several steps further. Comparing the maps of economic complexity between the two countries is quite instructive:
https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/can/
https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/aus/

They demonstrate Australia's much more poorly diversified economy, and its focus on relatively less complex products. Overall, from my vantage point Canada is the better structured economy, despite its own many, many deficiencies. Is Australia better positioned to the world's future economic growth? Undoubtedly. But key economic signals seem to suggest it's going in the wrong direction and ending up as a supplier of raw commodities to those fast-growing Asian countries.
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  #11463  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2018, 8:54 PM
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This came from BCStats but here goes:

Castlegar projected to grow 18.6% in the next 20 years! This leads the entire region in growth.
Nelson only 4.8%
Trail just 2%
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  #11464  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2018, 10:07 PM
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Immigration by metro area, 2017

Toronto back in 2nd place, Houston surpasses Chicago in a historic first

New York: 174,421
Toronto: 86,505
Los Angeles: 82,470
Miami: 80,133
Montreal: 44,615
Washington: 39,927
Houston: 38,686
Chicago: 36,832
San Francisco: 35,420
Dallas: 34,620
Boston: 29,908
Vancouver: 29,830
Atlanta: 21,341


Homeland Security, U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2017
https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/fi...dents_2017.pdf

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada , Permanent Residents – Monthly IRCC Updates
https://open.canada.ca/data/en/datas...9-9b8aff9b9eda
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  #11465  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2018, 11:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaskOttaLoo View Post
Well, from my reading I tend to think that Australia's economy is even worse-off than Canada's. See this link for a very long, in-depth and well-written analysis of the problems with Australia's economy: https://medium.com/@matt_11659/matt-...s-6877adb3fb2f

In essence, it has largely de-industrialized and relies on a property boom and natural resources. Well it could be easily argued that Canada has too, Australia has taken it several steps further. Comparing the maps of economic complexity between the two countries is quite instructive:
https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/can/
https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/aus/

They demonstrate Australia's much more poorly diversified economy, and its focus on relatively less complex products. Overall, from my vantage point Canada is the better structured economy, despite its own many, many deficiencies. Is Australia better positioned to the world's future economic growth? Undoubtedly. But key economic signals seem to suggest it's going in the wrong direction and ending up as a supplier of raw commodities to those fast-growing Asian countries.
Australia is an unusual case, due to its relative isolation. By being far outside supply chains for global industries, it makes it difficult to participate in value-added manufacturing and services.

Canada is on a continent of ~580 million people with a unified trade market. Europe has a population of ~740 million with a similar market. East Asia has billions. The consolidation and globalization of industries make low-volume production a non-starter on a unit cost perspective. In the past, the expense of shipping goods made it such that setting up production sites in foreign countries was easier than transport. That, along with protectionist barriers, allowed local industry to thrive.

Likewise, the service industry is now focused on a few hotspots in the world - ones that Australia isn't near and doesn't have enough critical mass to develop on its own.

The commodity boom accelerated the demise - it inflated the Australian dollar, making exports less competitive. That drove away the auto industry (pardon the pun) and gave Australia a case of Dutch Disease.

If China lands hard, Australia will feel the pinch. The bright side is that they have less government debt, so they have fiscal room to work with.
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  #11466  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2018, 6:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Denscity View Post
This came from BCStats but here goes:

Castlegar projected to grow 18.6% in the next 20 years! This leads the entire region in growth.
Nelson only 4.8%
Trail just 2%
Those are figures are as weak as one sees in the Maritimes. Even Castlegar's growth would be less than 1% annually and below the national growth rate.
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  #11467  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2018, 9:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denscity View Post
This came from BCStats but here goes:

Castlegar projected to grow 18.6% in the next 20 years! This leads the entire region in growth.
Nelson only 4.8%
Trail just 2%
Speaking of growth...I wonder what the exact date was when the population of British Columbia passed the 5,000,000 mark. I guess sometime in August?


The Statcan population clock says we are at 5,018,930 as of Oct 27, 2018.
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Last edited by craneSpotter; Oct 27, 2018 at 10:06 PM.
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  #11468  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2018, 4:50 PM
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Neat, 5 million is a pretty solid milestone for a province that had a population of 175,000 at the turn of the century.
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  #11469  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2018, 4:07 AM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Neat, 5 million is a pretty solid milestone for a province that had a population of 175,000 at the turn of the century.
I'd say so. That would work out to 268,056 new residents/year.
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  #11470  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2018, 6:55 PM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Neat, 5 million is a pretty solid milestone for a province that had a population of 175,000 at the turn of the century.
Wow!
4,825,000 in 18 years is phenomenal.
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  #11471  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2018, 9:24 PM
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I said turn of the century, not turn of the millennium
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  #11472  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2018, 12:17 PM
ILoveHalifax ILoveHalifax is offline
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I said turn of the century, not turn of the millennium
It is impossible to NOT turn a century with the turn of the millennium
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  #11473  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2018, 4:47 PM
Denscity Denscity is offline
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Those are figures are as weak as one sees in the Maritimes. Even Castlegar's growth would be less than 1% annually and below the national growth rate.
Well what's Nelson's problem then haha?! They hype up all the new people moving to town but just as many are leaving. They're at 11000 or so but used to be over 14k. Whereas at 8000 we've never been higher.
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Last edited by Denscity; Nov 15, 2018 at 5:06 PM.
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  #11474  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2018, 5:56 PM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
I said turn of the century, not turn of the millennium
Pretty sure the turn of the century was on January 1st, 2000.
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  #11475  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2018, 6:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Spocket View Post
Pretty sure the turn of the century was on January 1st, 2000.
Experts on such things would probably say it was January 1, 2001. The year 2000 was actually the last year of the 20th century.
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  #11476  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2018, 9:44 PM
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Yes. Also the year 1ad was the first year of the first century. There was no year 0. That would probably have been. 1 bc.
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  #11477  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2018, 11:57 PM
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I've seen "turn of the century" used to refer to 1999-2001 a few times, now, so I think it's becoming accepted terminology.
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  #11478  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 1:53 AM
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Originally Posted by dennis View Post
Yes. Also the year 1ad was the first year of the first century. There was no year 0. That would probably have been. 1 bc.
Why couldn’t they (whoever decides these things) have just stipulated that there *was* a year zero? It’s all just made up retrospectively anyway. It would have avoided this debate and others like it.
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  #11479  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 3:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Andy6 View Post
Why couldn’t they (whoever decides these things) have just stipulated that there *was* a year zero? It’s all just made up retrospectively anyway. It would have avoided this debate and others like it.
I disagree, I find the current way much more rational/logical. (i.e. we've gone through two millennia at the point the year 2000 (the 2000th year) ends, not starts)

Someone turns 50 years old only when they have fully completed their 50th year. If they're deep within their 50th year, they're still 49 years old. That's how everyone has always counted.
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  #11480  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2018, 3:40 AM
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That's how we tell time too. 45 minutes into the second hour, and it's still just 1:45.
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