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  #3001  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 10:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Still trying to wrap my head around Stratford being just outside (150 km) Toronto...
It's just a figure of speech, isn't it? In the context of speaking to Americans, who don't have any idea where Toronto is, it's just meant to indicate a general sense of closeness to a place they've heard of.

It might be 150 km to city hall, but it's about 40 km to where you hit the 401 at Kitchener, and that's where the traffic starts getting crazy busy, so in that sense we really are just outside the greater GTA.

I wouldn't say "just outside Toronto" to a Canadian, as I'd expect they'd have a better idea of the geography here, so I'd say "two hours outside of Toronto." Though come to think of it, when I'm in Quebec and get asked where I live in Ontario (it happens) I say "près de Toronto."
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  #3002  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2018, 1:23 PM
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Apparently our accents are thick to the Liverpudlians. A racing team from there had an emergency stop in St. John's.


http://www.thetelegram.com/news/loca...ls-are-223765/
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  #3003  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2018, 6:05 PM
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M., an Acadian friend from Nova Scotia who has been living here for years, created a French version of Newfoundland English to help Franks, who I was tormenting

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  #3004  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2018, 2:12 PM
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Friends who aren't from here raising their kids out around the bay. First text is Dad, blue is Mom (I assume, she posted the screenshot), other two grey ones are Grandmother.

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  #3005  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2018, 4:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I often tell clueless foreigners I live two hours west of Montreal.
I tell Americans that I'm from the South. When they ask me what part I say Nova Scotia and Ontario. Other times I'll say this tiny damp island off the coast of France. Which one? Britain.
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  #3006  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 8:47 PM
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I had to change the drain on my kitchen sink so I looked up some youtube videos. This is one that came up. Within a few seconds you can tell he is clearly Canadian. The way he says "so" is the biggest giveaway at the beginning (15 secs).

Does his accent seem like it could come from anywhere between ON and BC? Or do you detect something more regional here?


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  #3007  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 9:02 PM
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By the way, I'm new to this thread. Haven't gone through it yet. I'll chip in with a couple of observations, which I'm sure have been covered before.

Seems like so many Canadians pronounce every syllable, particularly out west.

I hear people from the western provinces say "a-boat" more than the east. And I sometimes hear this from Ontarians SW of the GTA. While I often hear people from east of the GTA says "abouut", which is the best way I can describe it. So not stereotypically "aboot".

Also I'd like to say that Newfie accent is in my top 5 in the world with South African, Jamaican, Cockney and Irish. Could listen to it all day.
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  #3008  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 9:20 PM
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Forgive me if these have been posted before.

Virtually every hockey player says "and uh", "so" and "ya know" at least a hundred times in any given interview. It has bugged ever since I was like 15 years old!

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Toronto accent for so many young people, as played up by Drake. Mostly minorities but I hear it come across from time to time from even the white youtes. Borrows elements from Jamaica and London.

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  #3009  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 9:30 PM
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New movie that takes place in Little Italy in TO. I know this is supposed to appeal to a wide audience, and they needed professional actors, but this is not an accurate representation of how Italians in the GTA speak. Have read comments to the same effect online.

Now, I've spent way, way more time with Italians in Woodbridge, Maple, King City, Brampton and Sauga than Little Italy or Corso Italia. So can other TO people here confirm that they also speak with the "Woodbridge accent" down there in the city like they do in the 'burbs?


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  #3010  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 9:53 PM
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From Kroll Show, the greatest sketch comedy show of all time IMO. They have several Canadian writers and actors on the show hence the regular skits called Wheels Ontario and Show us Your Songs Toronto.


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  #3011  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2018, 2:09 AM
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When I was in high school here in Timmins, there were some guys of Italian background who were just like those guys in Woodbridge. They even spoke in a very similar way. It was usually the ones who were into trouble and not doing very well in school. The majority of guys of Italian background were usually very outstanding people and went on to be quite successful. Almost every female ended up doing well too.
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  #3012  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2018, 2:45 AM
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God that Little Italy movie looks stupid. The trailer makes it look like they decided to recycle plot material from three other movies, and film it somewhere else.
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  #3013  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2018, 5:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megadude View Post
By the way, I'm new to this thread. Haven't gone through it yet. I'll chip in with a couple of observations, which I'm sure have been covered before.

Seems like so many Canadians pronounce every syllable, particularly out west.

I hear people from the western provinces say "a-boat" more than the east. And I sometimes hear this from Ontarians SW of the GTA. While I often hear people from east of the GTA says "abouut", which is the best way I can describe it. So not stereotypically "aboot".

Also I'd like to say that Newfie accent is in my top 5 in the world with South African, Jamaican, Cockney and Irish. Could listen to it all day.
As a Prairie boy (Winnipeg), I have never heard anyone say a-boat, at least in my neck of the woods. The way most people say about, house, south, etc. Is similar to the way the Scottish/Irish/people in Eastern Canada say those words, generally anything with "ou" in it. This includes all my rellies in rural Manitoba with the typical heavy Ukrainian-Canadian farmer accent.

In terms of a-boot, I don't hear this in Canada, but I do hear it in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin, the supposedly Canadian-esque states.
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Last edited by Pinus; Oct 8, 2018 at 8:20 PM.
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  #3014  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2018, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
When I was in high school here in Timmins, there were some guys of Italian background who were just like those guys in Woodbridge. They even spoke in a very similar way. It was usually the ones who were into trouble and not doing very well in school. The majority of guys of Italian background were usually very outstanding people and went on to be quite successful. Almost every female ended up doing well too.

Total coincidence. I was watching other videos from this 4YE youtube channel right after I read your comment. And for some reason there was a brief reference to Timmins at 32 secs I didn't understand.

Anyway, I can see what you're saying. I went to school with four Italians from Sudbury and they exhibited these traits only a little bit, but then again, these were the ones that were the more academic type instead of the stereotypical type.


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  #3015  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2018, 12:45 PM
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Don't know about Winnipeg people, but I hear a-boat from a lot of hockey players. More players from AB and BC so a greater sample size.

Shane Doan example at 1:44 of the video.

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Also Ray Ferraro, from Trail BC, at 2:15 mark.

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  #3016  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2018, 2:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megadude View Post
Total coincidence. I was watching other videos from this 4YE youtube channel right after I read your comment. And for some reason there was a brief reference to Timmins at 32 secs I didn't understand.

Anyway, I can see what you're saying. I went to school with four Italians from Sudbury and they exhibited these traits only a little bit, but then again, these were the ones that were the more academic type instead of the stereotypical type.


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Not sure what that reference to Timmins is all about but it shows one of our highway welcome signs and the Travelodge. Not sure.

Yeah, there are quite a few people from Italian background in Northern Ontario, especially in the cities and a few specific towns like Schreiber. But a lot of people here who will say that they are "Italian" or have an Italian last name will have a mixed background often with French, Finnish, etc.. Sault Ste Marie has the largest concentration of Italian-Canadian population in Northern Ontario at over 25% of its residents. There you will find a lot of diversity among that population such as rich, poor, educated, uneducated and more.

I didn't hear the terms "Gino" and "Gina" until I lived in Southern Ontario for a couple of years and it seemed to come from people in the GTA. But there were many very similar things with both Northern and Southern ones, especially in clothing, food and music.
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  #3017  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 10:42 PM
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Lots of Canadians like to pronounce with a hard "T". Like saying "better" the way it looks as opposed to saying "bedder".

I was in a compliance meeting (fun!) and one guy just hit every T so hard when speaking that it's all I could notice and couldn't pay attention to what he was discussing.

Here is an example on a youtube tutorial. Within 15 seconds you know this guy is Canadian. No, he doesn't sound like a hoser, but he really does emphasize the letter T. Though not as hard as the guy in my meeting.

Also, Canadians in general just sound nicer and have that more friendly disposition compared to Americans. As well, I find Canadians to not have as deep a voice in general and I notice way more Canadians tend to have nasally voices than Americans.

Again, apologies if this has been covered before.


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  #3018  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megadude View Post
Lots of Canadians like to pronounce with a hard "T". Like saying "better" the way it looks as opposed to saying "bedder".

I was in a compliance meeting (fun!) and one guy just hit every T so hard when speaking that it's all I could notice and couldn't pay attention to what he was discussing.

Here is an example on a youtube tutorial. Within 15 seconds you know this guy is Canadian. No, he doesn't sound like a hoser, but he really does emphasize the letter T. Though not as hard as the guy in my meeting.

Also, Canadians in general just sound nicer and have that more friendly disposition compared to Americans. As well, I find Canadians to not have as deep a voice in general and I notice way more Canadians tend to have nasally voices than Americans.

Again, apologies if this has been covered before.
...
I listened to the video and didn't hear any of the sorts of words where Canadians tend to pronounce a "t" as a "d" (e.g. wadder, bedder, madder, and, in Ottawa, Shadow Laurier ). What am i missing?
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  #3019  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 11:27 PM
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The double T is something in general I notice like the guy in my meeting. But didn't mean that example was in the video. That video was just for the letter T in general. Seems like more than half the time a T is in the middle or end of a word he tends to emphasize it. Americans don't tend to do that.
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  #3020  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 12:42 AM
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Originally Posted by megadude View Post
The double T is something in general I notice like the guy in my meeting. But didn't mean that example was in the video. That video was just for the letter T in general. Seems like more than half the time a T is in the middle or end of a word he tends to emphasize it. Americans don't tend to do that.
Probably because many Americans have a somewhat staccato speaking style that emphasizes the first letter/first syllable of words in away not common among Canadians. The guy in the video just has better than average enunciation, istm.
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