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  #9701  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2018, 11:12 PM
Hackslack Hackslack is offline
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Glad to see you hold Canada in such esteem where we're too small to make a difference in anything. That's the sort of can't-do attitude that I'm glad others don't have.
Lol, im trying to look at the situation from an “environmentalist” point of view, as the respective policies of those I listed are going to be implemented, they must know something the rest of us don’t. I mean, while it makes absolutely ZERO sense to me to impose such strict environmental regulations on our own domestic energy industry such that capital investment is fleeing the country, yet not imposing any sort of regulation whatsoever on energy imports from countries that don’t give a FF about the environment, it obviously makes sense to them, and therefore I must acknowledge they know something the rest of us don’t.

Here is still hoping the marine environment research project that is required to get Trans mountain approved, will also be required for those crude tankers carrying imported energy products. While everyone is so concerned about the orcas on the west coast, why aren’t the belugas on the east coast getting the same concerns from foreign tankers? Are orcas more important than belugas? The belugas must know the sort of marine traffic that floats on the east coast water, the same way the orcas know the type of marine traffic on the west coast water. I mean, if an orca can tell the difference between cruise ships, coal bulk carrier vessels, cargo vessels, oil vessels, tug boats, personal marine vessels, surely the belugas can identify each of those as well, no?!

I mean if the Earth is in fact in such a dire situation, with climate change predicted to be catastrophic, with what is considered to be one of the most important issues in the history of peoplekind, yet our leaders are only handcuffing our own energy with world class environmental regulations, and doing absolutely nothing on imports from countries that have no environmental regulations, seems absolutely ass backwards... but, as I say, though the globe is at a crossroads, the governments we elected must know what is best, and if that means to continue to import energy from places that don’t look after the environment, and stranglehold ours which does look after the environment, then I trust our planet is in good hands.

Last edited by Hackslack; Oct 10, 2018 at 11:26 PM.
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  #9702  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2018, 11:54 PM
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Dunno about Belugas, but we're hitting/killing Right Whales left and... uh... right out here.
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  #9703  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 9:05 AM
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STATISTICS SHOW AUGUST HAD THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF WORKERS EMPLOYED ON SITE C THUS FAR

By Chris Newton - October 10, 2018


Main service bay pad and powerhouse buttress construction on the south bank at Site C in August 2018. Photo by BC Hydro

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The size of the workforce employed in building the Site C dam has reached yet another record high, exceeding 3,500 workers in August.

According to statistics published by BC Hydro today, there were a total of 3,561 workers employed on Site C in August, up from 3,303 in July.

The number of contractors on site sat at 2,911, which is 236 more contractors than during the previous month. The number of engineers and project team members did increase after a big drop from June to July, and in August totalled 650.


Of the over 2,900 contractors at Site C, 2,262, or 78 percent were B.C. residents.

The number of Peace River Regional District resident contractors employed at Site C saw another increase, jumping from 705 to 757, while the percent of local contractors stayed steady at 26 percent.

The number of temporary foreign workers employed as contractors at Site C in August doubled, from three in July to six.

...

https://www.energeticcity.ca/2018/10...te-c-thus-far/
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  #9704  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 9:07 AM
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an opionion piece

How the Canadian Right Invented, Then Killed, Carbon Taxes
And why their anti-tax zeal could kill the chance for new pipelines.

By David Climenhaga Yesterday | TheTyee.ca
David J. Climenhaga is an award-winning journalist, author, post-secondary teacher, poet and trade union communicator. He blogs at AlbertaPolitics.ca, where this column first appeared. Follow him on Twitter at @djclimenhaga.



https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/10/1...-Carbon-Taxes/
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  #9705  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 9:08 AM
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ENCANA CEO SAYS CARBON TAXES COST $100,000 PER WELL IN NORTHEASTERN B.C.

By Canadian Press - October 10, 2018

CALGARY, A.B. – The CEO of Encana Corp. says government policy is making Canada an increasingly uncompetitive place to drill for oil and gas.

Doug Suttles says it costs his company about $100,000 in carbon taxes on the diesel required to drill and complete each well in northeastern British Columbia, a cost his competitors in similar plays in the United States do not pay.

He told the Energy Roundtable conference in Calgary that Encana’s wells produce clean-burning natural gas which is then processed in one of three recently built gas plants that use emissions-free hydro electricity.


Eventually, as facilities are built, that gas will be shipped to a hydro electricity-powered liquefied natural gas export terminal on the West Coast and on to Asia, where it may replace coal in producing electricity.

...

https://www.energeticcity.ca/2018/10...theastern-b-c/
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  #9706  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 1:28 PM
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Encana are using 770,000L of diesel to complete a well? Maybe they should look at how to reduce that.

They are acting as if the increased cost is a bug, but it is a feature and is exactly how a carbon tax is supposed to work. I bet they could reduce their diesel use quite easily, given the incredible waste I have seen when it comes to fuel use in the oilfield.

The problem now is not that our producers pay a carbon tax, but that those in other countries don't. So for now we shouldn't go to hard on the tax, which is exactly the course that has been set.
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  #9707  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 1:57 PM
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
an opionion piece

How the Canadian Right Invented, Then Killed, Carbon Taxes
And why their anti-tax zeal could kill the chance for new pipelines.

By David Climenhaga Yesterday | TheTyee.ca
David J. Climenhaga is an award-winning journalist, author, post-secondary teacher, poet and trade union communicator. He blogs at AlbertaPolitics.ca, where this column first appeared. Follow him on Twitter at @djclimenhaga.



https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/10/1...-Carbon-Taxes/
I get the sense conservatives enjoy killing energy projects through innocuous incompetence, because it energizes their base to use terms like 'libtard' and 'snowflake'.
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  #9708  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 4:19 PM
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That gas line rupture near Prince George could have quite an impact, possibly cutting supplies to BC and Washington state:

FortisBC estimates about 70 per cent of its one million gas customers have the potential to lose gas supply due to this incident.
British Columbians should brace for possible loss of natural gas service and soaring gasoline prices after an Enbridge natural gas line ruptured north of Prince George.

Natural gas supplier FortisBC has asked one million customers to lower their thermostats and limit other gas use as much as possible while the damage is repaired. About 700,000 homes in northern B.C., the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island could temporarily lose gas service altogether...

https://theprovince.com/news/local-n...c-c2e10afc98bc


A pipeline explosion in British Columbia on Tuesday cut off the flow of Canadian natural gas into Washington, raising the risk of power outages around the state.

Puget Sound Energy (PSE), Avista Corp. and Cascade Natural Gas said Wednesday that their gas supplies had been disrupted due to the explosion that occurred a day earlier and asked their customers to reduce consumption. The three companies serve almost 2.4 million customers combined, mostly in Washington, according to the companies’ websites...

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle...line-ruptures/
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  #9709  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 4:41 PM
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Originally Posted by once View Post
I get the sense conservatives enjoy killing energy projects through innocuous incompetence, because it energizes their base to use terms like 'libtard' and 'snowflake'.
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  #9710  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 9:53 PM
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Damn latte-sipping feminazi snowflakes!!
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  #9711  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 10:05 PM
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BC Gas prices set to soar.

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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
Pipeline ruptures, sparks massive fire north of Prince George, B.C.

The Canadian Press
OCTOBER 9, 2018



A pipeline has ruptured and sparked a massive fire north of Prince George, B.C. is shown in this photo provided by Dhruv Desai. British Columbia's Ministry of Environment says it has been notified of the incident and that the 900 PSI gas line is operated by Enbridge. It says the incident is ongoing in the community of Shelley, northeast of Prince George. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Dhruv Desai

PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. — About 100 members of a First Nation community in northern British Columbia were evacuated from their homes Tuesday evening after a gas pipeline ruptured, sparking a massive blaze.

The rupture happened on a natural gas transmission pipeline owned and operated by Enbridge about 13.5 kilometres from Prince George on Tuesday evening, Enbridge spokesman Michael Barnes said in an emailed statement.

...

https://www.alaskahighwaynews.ca/pip...b-c-1.23458015
Isn't it fortunate that the BC lower mainland is supplied with most of its gasoline and its refinery with oil from the TransMountain pipeline!

British Columbians should brace for possible loss of natural gas service and soaring gasoline prices after an Enbridge natural gas line ruptured north of Prince George.

The wholesale price of gasoline surged on the Pacific Northwest commodity market on news that Royal Dutch Shell and Phillips 66 were shutting down gasoline refinery units in Washington State after losing their supply of natural gas. Natural gas is used to power the refining process.

The Enbridge pipeline supplies about half the natural gas used in Washington State, Oregon and Idaho.

The Parkland gasoline refinery in Burnaby has “curtailed” operations, but has not yet shut down any process units, according to company spokesman Kel Coulson.
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  #9712  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 10:09 PM
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Some tidbits from the latest provincial Vital Signs report.











Also, wow, we restrain a lot of old people to their beds in nursing homes...

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  #9713  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2018, 10:24 PM
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Cool graphics, thanks for sharing!
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  #9714  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 12:40 AM
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Originally Posted by jawagord View Post
Isn't it fortunate that the BC lower mainland is supplied with most of its gasoline and its refinery with oil from the TransMountain pipeline!

British Columbians should brace for possible loss of natural gas service and soaring gasoline prices after an Enbridge natural gas line ruptured north of Prince George.

The wholesale price of gasoline surged on the Pacific Northwest commodity market on news that Royal Dutch Shell and Phillips 66 were shutting down gasoline refinery units in Washington State after losing their supply of natural gas. Natural gas is used to power the refining process.

The Enbridge pipeline supplies about half the natural gas used in Washington State, Oregon and Idaho.

The Parkland gasoline refinery in Burnaby has “curtailed” operations, but has not yet shut down any process units, according to company spokesman Kel Coulson.
The only thing to wonder about is why they're even using LNG to power their refineries when there is so much cheap and clean hydro power available form BC Hydro.
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  #9715  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 4:57 AM
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The only thing to wonder about is why they're even using LNG to power their refineries when there is so much cheap and clean hydro power available form BC Hydro.
They’re using natural gas in the refinement process, not for powering the refinery...
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  #9716  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 7:59 AM
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Montreal soaring to new economic heights, but headwinds still buffet the summit

Source: National Post

MONTREAL — In a sun-lit lecture space at Ecole Polytechnique, Joelle Pineau explained how a machine can create a recipe from a photo of a tourtiere.

It’s not easy as pie, but rather the fruit of 12 months of experimentation at Facebook’s new artificial intelligence lab, which she heads up in Montreal.

“I would like the robot that goes with it and then makes the recipe,” joked Pineau, an associate professor at McGill University.

Facebook’s lab has already expanded to 20 specialists from four since its launch in September 2017, with plans to move to a bigger facility come January. Microsoft Corp. and Google parent Alphabet Inc. have both launched Montreal-based AI labs in the past two years, and aim to hire scores more researchers in the next year or so.

It’s not just Montreal’s AI sector that’s booming. A mix of cutting-edge tech clusters, real estate growth and old mainstays like tourism and shipping are transforming the city into an economic hot spot after decades of battling a frosty business image.

Regional gross domestic product grew 3.5 per cent in 2017, according to Statistics Canada, outpacing Toronto and Vancouver as Montreal enjoyed its biggest growth spurt in more than 10 years. Unemployment has hovered at around six per cent for the past 12 months, remaining near all-time lows.

Meanwhile, foreign direct investment surpassed $2 billion in 2017, a new record that marks a 50 per cent increase over 2016 and a 100 per cent jump from 2015.

“There’s definitely a buzz around Montreal, especially the high-tech sectors,” said Christian Bernard, chief economist with Montreal International, an economic development agency.

Up to 75 per cent of foreign direct investment last year went toward high-tech sectors such as gaming, visual effects and aerospace as well as life sciences and health technology, he said.

“The technology is very broad, and the talent can move around from one area to another, one niche application to another,” said Universite de Montreal computer scientist and deep-learning pioneer Yoshua Bengio, who serves as scientific director of the new Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms.

Bengio cited as a key catalyst French gaming company Ubisoft Entertainment SA, which opened a small office in Montreal in 1997 that now employs 3,500 workers.

Cash has been pouring into Montreal from public and private institutions, including more than $300 million over the next five years from the federal and provincial governments to bankroll big data research at Montreal universities and foster a regional AI “super-cluster”.

Brad Henderson, chief executive of Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, said mortgage stress tests and higher interest rates haven’t dampened Montreal’s real estate market, which he called the healthiest in Canada.

The city’s $1 million-plus real estate sales increased 19 per cent year over year in July and August, and they’re poised “to set new records to the end of 2018,” according to a Sotheby’s report in September.

Quebec’ political situation has calmed investor fears, he added.

“Montreal’s always kind of had a bit of a political overhang,” Henderson said, “but the concerns about separatism have largely dissipated, and that in our opinion has contributed to the steady growth that we’ve seen in Montreal.”

Montreal’s port continues to underpin the regional economy, as the year-old free-trade deal between Canada and the European Union boosts container shipping and prompts a hiring spree at the docks, according to port officials.

Container imports increased 7.8 per cent to nearly 4.33 million tonnes in the first seven months of this year compared with the same period in 2017, with the bulk of that traffic coming from Europe.

Tourism is also on the rise, with Trudeau International Airport welcoming more than 11 million foreign passengers in the first eight months of 2018 for a 6.9 per cent year-over-year gain, according to Tourisme Montreal.

However, the same features Montrealers cite as strengths can detract from the city’s sheen as well.

In 2016, median household incomes in Montreal climbed more quickly than in many metropolitan areas, but they remained among the lowest of any major city in Canada at $61,790, according to StatCan figures.

High employment points to a severe thirst for a bigger talent pool, said Montreal Board of Trade president Michel Leblanc.

Many parts of the province are now “beyond full employment,” with a demand for more qualified workers in sectors ranging from hospitality to transportation to the tech scene, Leblanc said.

“We need to have more immigrants,” he said, one day before Quebeckers voted the Coalition Avenir Quebec to power on Oct. 1, whose leader Francois Legault has pledged to reduce immigration by 20 per cent.

One-third of Quebec’s workforce will have to be replaced in the next 10 years as the population ages, said Mia Homsy, director of the Institut du Quebec, a public policy think tank.

“It’s already starting to affect investments and production, with a direct impact on GDP,” she said.

Population growth in the Montreal census metropolitan area has been relatively slow, rising 11 per cent to 4.1 million residents between 2007 and 2017, according to StatCan. The rate lags well behind Canada’s five other biggest urban areas.

Despite its rapid growth, Montreal’s affordability is better than many of the other 10 biggest cities on the continent, said Loic Jegousse, head of cyber and IT risk with a BNP Paribas team that launched in Montreal last May.

“I myself have two teenage daughters. I used to live in Toronto, and I thought it would be wise to come to Montreal so they can actually afford a home when they grow up,” he said.

“Montreal was very sleepy for a long, long time, but now it is going through a renaissance.”
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  #9717  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 12:35 PM
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I will be interested to see what impact, if any, the CAQ government's policies will have on Montreal's/Quebec's economies. I would have expected them to be rather business-friendly, but I have not heard much about their economic policies.
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  #9718  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2018, 3:17 AM
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Montreal has so much going for it, that her best days are still ahead of her.

Now that the independence push is effectively dead, it can take advantage of her many strengths................excellent schools, a well educated population, a huge creative class and enviornment, very low electricity costs, affordable real estate and rentals so it can appeal to the Millenials that have given up on Toronto and Vancouver, great transit, an Eastern time zone with excellent shipping, rail, and road connections to the Great Lakes and Atlantic Seaboard, a bilingual workforce, a very vibrant arts and cultural scene, and a wonderful quality of life in a beautiful and enchanting city.
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  #9719  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2018, 8:11 PM
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Companies able to hire internationally to P.E.I. through federal program

'We're seeing some vacancies right across P.E.I., from all areas, from rural to urban'

CBC News · Posted: Oct 12, 2018


Six welders were hired for the MacDougall Steel fabrication facility in Borden-Carleton through the AIPP. (John Robertson/CBC)

More than 200 companies on P.E.I. are now designated to apply to hire foreign nationals under the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program (AIPP).

The federal program was launched in March 2017 in all four Atlantic provinces. It allows businesses to hire foreign nationals to fill positions they haven't been able to fill locally.

"We're seeing some vacancies right across P.E.I., from all areas, from rural to urban," said Jamie Aiken, executive director of P.E.I.'s Office of Immigration.

"We're seeing some individuals that have very specialized quality assurance credentials; potentially engineers, machinists, that have various skill sets that aren't readily available here."

...

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/princ...p=FB_Post_News
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  #9720  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 6:04 AM
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When I think of all of the bigger things I've bought over the last couple of years that were made in Canada, almost all of those things were made in Quebec. (kayaks, canoe, trailer, kitchen table and chairs) And all of those things were made by not so big companies that began in Quebec. I can see why Quebec has been doing well lately.

I find that way too many Ontarians bitch when some American company closes shop and moves production to the U.S. and they like to blame the government, taxes or whatever rather than that company itself. Yet in Quebec you see Quebecers starting up so many of their own companies. In Ontario I find that many smaller sized companies don't get the attention they deserve.
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