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  #1  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 10:49 AM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Tour around Shrewsbury, English Midlands.

Hi all, took some pics around my home town in the English Midlands a couple of weeks ago that I thought I would add to an old thread I created here a while ago. But when I found it all the links were broken so here goes a new one!

Starting outside the train station which was built in 1848.







Shrewsbury isn't in Wales, but sometimes you can see clues that the border is only a few miles outside town, like the bilingual markings on these police cars.











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Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 9:55 AM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Up the street to in and around the castle.











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Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 12:28 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 2:39 PM
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Beautiful
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Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 5:03 PM
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Looks very nice. Is Shrewsbury a major tourist town?
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Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 6:32 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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A minor one. It's not on the A-list of smaller UK tourist towns like Bath or Oxford or York, but it might just about scrape onto the B-list.
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Old Posted Oct 14, 2018, 11:44 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Some shops and architecture in the town centre.





















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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 1:20 AM
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Attractive looking town, thanks Jonesy.
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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 3:36 AM
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Very nice! I like it and what a great day to take photos too!
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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 8:38 AM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Thanks guys! Yes it was a nice sunny day.

Some of the main shopping area now, the pedestrianised street you see here is currently a mess as it's being dug up and remodelled. You'll notice quite a few timber framed 16th century Tudor buildings around the town, that's probably the style of architecture it is best known for, though there are also quite a lot of Georgian buildings from the 18th and early 19th centuries in the town centre too. And you might also notice a few unsympathetic 20th century horrors in there too!














Last edited by Jonesy55; Oct 15, 2018 at 9:53 AM.
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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 5:11 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Right in the middle of the town centre is The Square. In the middle of The Square is the 16th century Old Market Hall which was built for the wool trade when Shrewsbury was a major centre for that industry. Today it houses a cafe and cinema on the upper floors.

http://www.oldmarkethall.co.uk/Home/home/



















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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 7:12 PM
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Interesting. My knowledge of the UK is very limited to southern England and (some) London.
Of course I'd never heard of this. The little town center is quaint, just like what English tourists would often look for when they get down to France.

There's still a bit of the typical overdose of red brick. Lol. That's not too bad anyway.
This is northern Europe, right? Red bricks, then even more and more red/brown bricks...
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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 7:55 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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You can never get enough red brick!

In London it's often a yellowish brick rather than red.
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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 7:58 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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A few more for tonight, featuring lots of red brick.























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Old Posted Oct 15, 2018, 8:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55 View Post
You can never get enough red brick!
I know it's great. It is a fantastic texture when properly manufactured, but then it's kinda pricey.
We did a lot of it down here too in the past.
Up to Toulouse, "la ville rose" (pink city). Look at this stuff down there for instance...


http://www.blondeatlas.com/blog-1//r...nd-montpellier

Warm, comfortable, very nice atmosphere. It's easier than poorly precast concrete, that's no secret.
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Old Posted Oct 17, 2018, 2:00 PM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Brick is normally a big part of vernacular architecture in areas with not much stone and plenty of clay soils I think, hence why it's common in many areas of the North European Plain from Flanders across to the Baltic and much of Southern and Central England. If you go across to West Wales, Cornwall, parts of Northern England and Scotland you will find more stone construction in traditional buildings, either bare or rendered.

Some more around the back streets and along the river Severn which forms almost a complete loop around the town centre. The looming hulk of a building across the river is the main town theatre.





























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Old Posted Oct 17, 2018, 3:36 PM
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Brick is normally a big part of vernacular architecture in areas with not much stone and plenty of clay soils I think, hence why it's common in many areas of the North European Plain from Flanders across to the Baltic and much of Southern and Central England. If you go across to West Wales, Cornwall, parts of Northern England and Scotland you will find more stone construction in traditional buildings, either bare or rendered.
Yes, I was thinking the same, but just intuitively.

For example, in my region, the subsoil of ancient limestone quarries is like some Swiss cheese, so some areas bear "no admittance" (forbidden to the public) signs for safety reason, cause the ground could downright collapse under one's feet.
I saw things like that in the woods of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, a suburb of Paris. Sometimes, it causes problems to build new things over old quarries.
Therefore, I think the old brick we have here was mostly designed as a fancy trend, especially in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but wasn't such a traditional local thing.
I do like it very much anyway. These bricks make up legit and stylish historic buildings in the urban fabric.

I was also thinking of the Scottish stone that was showcased on here in a couple of Edinburgh threads.
It looks so solid that they would even have taken some of it up to Canada.
Most noticeably to Montreal.
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Old Posted Oct 19, 2018, 10:54 AM
Jonesy55 Jonesy55 is offline
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Some more. Storefronts and alleyways, restaurants and churches.





















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Old Posted Oct 19, 2018, 10:56 AM
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Old Posted Oct 19, 2018, 10:58 AM
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