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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2008, 6:28 AM
pico44 pico44 is offline
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30) Persophone by Thomas Hart Benton. Benton was the greatest of the American regionalists, and this is his finest painting. Here is the story of Persophone and Hades, a wholly mythological subject in the European tradition. But the painting is equally American, The female figure recalls pin-up calenders of the middle twentieth century, and the landscape is pure Americana. American Gothic may receive all the glory as the apex of regionalist art, but as anyone can see; it is relatively undeserving.


Nelson Museum of Art
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2008, 3:06 PM
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31) Sir Thomas More by Hans Holbein. If I had to make a list of the greatest technical painters throughout history, Holbein would be very near the top along with van Eyck, da Vinci, and Ingres. The problem very often with painters who can apply paint photographically however; is that the emotion, or soul of a subject is very often lost in the painstaking process. If you look at the vast majority of Holbein's work, it is undoubtedly brilliant, but soul-less as well. The Ambassadors may be his most famous work, but to me it is completely uninspiring. His Thomas More, on the other hand, is absolutely riveting. One can sense that Holbein had great respect for More. I see conviction, morality, and perhaps a bit of stubborness in his face. At the same time fallibility and a tiny hint of fear--perhaps in the knowledge of his own fate. If this canvas inspires you to learn more about More, rent A Man for All Seasons; it's a great movie. I believe this is the greatest painting Holbein ever created, although his portrait of Charles de Solier in Dresden comes pretty damn close.




Frick Collection, New York

Last edited by pico44; Oct 27, 2011 at 1:21 AM.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2008, 9:37 PM
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A favorite of mine that you have not listed is Moulin Rouge by Toulouse Lautrec. His paintings are always so moody and seedy, yet lovely, and their perspective is just always abit of kilter.
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2008, 10:31 PM
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A favorite of mine that you have not listed is Moulin Rouge by Toulouse Lautrec. His paintings are always so moody and seedy, yet lovely, and their perspective is just always abit of kilter.

It is a wonderful painting, and you will eventually see it on this list. Just not above Monet, Degas and Gauguin.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2008, 5:52 AM
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I agree with you whole-heartedly about Klee.
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  #26  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2008, 7:54 AM
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Eigenwelt Eigenwelt is offline
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I, too, must take umbrage with the title of this thread.

"America's greatest paintings" would have been more appropriate as it not only takes into consideration the difference in a painting being in America as opposed to being American, but it also limits the art being ranked to painting specifically.

As a sculptor I'd like to point out that there is far more to art than just painting. Sculpture, photography, new forms, music, cinema, performance, decorative, folk, commercial, and especially apropos given the nature of this forum... architecture. And that is just to name a few.
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  #27  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 3:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Eigenwelt View Post
I, too, must take umbrage with the title of this thread.

"America's greatest paintings" would have been more appropriate as it not only takes into consideration the difference in a painting being in America as opposed to being American, but it also limits the art being ranked to painting specifically.

As a sculptor I'd like to point out that there is far more to art than just painting. Sculpture, photography, new forms, music, cinema, performance, decorative, folk, commercial, and especially apropos given the nature of this forum... architecture. And that is just to name a few.


You are absolutely correct. I'll change it if i can figure out how.
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  #28  
Old Posted May 4, 2008, 11:27 PM
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32) Woman I by Willem de Kooning. It's about time de Kooning got his just recognition. He was one of geniuses of the abstract expressionist movement, but I don't believe he had the cohesive ideology of others in the field--such as Pollock or Rothko--which makes their work more approachable. I had trouble choosing between this piece and Excavation which hangs in Chicago, and is equally brilliant. But I prefer his woman series to his more abstract stuff, where he often alludes to this same figure in subtle ways. Here she is in all of her grotesque glory. As always he uses color in the most wonderful way.


MOMA
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  #29  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2008, 3:01 PM
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  #30  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2008, 5:46 AM
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Are you kidding me, Madame X by John Singer Sargent at 24. You place a screen-print in the top ten. Andy was a horrid painter and Pollack is not a painter he is a dripper. Maybe I missed Duchamp? Where is he? henri toulouse lautrec? Egon schiele? Modern paintings are boring and pretentiuos, they should never be in the top 25 ever in any country. I'm just blogging this cause your postings are too one sided as no one here is concerned with art that is not about buildings. Post this on a art forum buddy.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2009, 4:46 AM
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Are you kidding me, Madame X by John Singer Sargent at 24. You place a screen-print in the top ten. Andy was a horrid painter and Pollack is not a painter he is a dripper. Maybe I missed Duchamp? Where is he? henri toulouse lautrec? Egon schiele? Modern paintings are boring and pretentiuos, they should never be in the top 25 ever in any country. I'm just blogging this cause your postings are too one sided as no one here is concerned with art that is not about buildings. Post this on a art forum buddy.
a. Andy Warhol painted quite well before he became known for what he's known for today. He was in-fact one of the most successful illustrators in the late 50's. He was for sure not "horrid".

b. What's wrong with a screen print?

c. Pollack was trained by Thomas Benton, the one who painted persephone at the top of this page. If you knew anything about Pollack you'd know that he didn't "drip" his whole life. He's an excellent painter, and knows a whole lot more about space, composition, and color than someone like egon schiele. (no beef against schiele)

d. Singer Sargent, Duchamp, Egon Schiele, AND Toulouse Lautrec all happen to be modern painters.

I happen to care little about buildings, and believe that caring about buildings has absolutely nothing to do with how one feels about all art. Your post is the most pretentious and one-sided in this thread. You contradicted yourself a good four times, and i suggest you do research before you tell innocent people having a good time talking about art the wrong information, "buddy".
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  #32  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2009, 9:10 PM
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This thread is under construction
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  #33  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2009, 2:40 PM
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One of my favourite paintings: The Old Guitarist, Picasso

Art Institute of Chicago
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  #34  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2010, 4:32 AM
pico44 pico44 is offline
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I wish I could redo this. Maybe I will...
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  #35  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2010, 10:55 AM
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You should, because if we forummers like to talk about buildings which are supposedly architecture, then we should also be able to talk about art, since both are arts. By the way maybe you should include sculpture in your topic of America's greatest artwork, Chagall's " Four Season's", maybe the Statue of Liberty or Maya Lin's Vietnam Veteran's Memorial, which maybe the greatest piece of civic art in the country.
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  #36  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2011, 10:21 PM
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33) Painterly Realism of a Boy With a Knapsack by Kazimir Malevich. The father of abstraction with one of his earliest quantum leaps. And I think his best one.


MOMA



34) Nude Descending a Staircase II by Marcel Duchamp From cubism to dada, Duchamp was a god of modern art. This painting was a sensation when it was shown at the Armory Show in 1913. When he arrived in New York a couple years later, he was surprised to find out he was already a celebrity. He decided to stay.


Philadelphia Museum of Art



35) Love Song by Giorgio de Chirico. Absolutely one of my favorite artists ever. De Chirico developed an especially beautiful melancholy with his surreal dreamscapes. A decade before surrealism became a popular painterly style! This is a world of isolation, deep meaning and familiar amalgamated unfamiliarity. This is the world of my unconscious.


MOMA
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  #37  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2011, 7:02 AM
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It is a wonderful painting, and you will eventually see it on this list. Just not above Monet, Degas and Gauguin.
sure, no doubt about it..
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  #38  
Old Posted May 23, 2012, 12:13 AM
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I find that the lack of Kline and Rothko to be.....disappointing
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  #39  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2012, 4:00 AM
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Anyhow, all statements in this thread represent only the viewpoints of the author and are therefore not subject to derision, anger or indignation. They are opinion.
You're posting a public forum. You can't tell people how they're allowed to react as long as it's within the forum guidelines.
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