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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2010, 10:03 PM
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the great lakes is just a sub region of the midwest. Its like how New England is part of the North East. I agree with that map but id probably group Minnesota with the Great Lakes region, instead of great plains... ive never been there, but it is on a great lake, and is more built up than kansas, nebraska, south dakota etc...
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  #22  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2010, 1:50 AM
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Originally Posted by LMich View Post
That map is my definition of Midwest by state lines, and living in Iowa I'm close to the center. To get precise, I tend to think of the Midwest/West line being halfway through the Plains states, so the Black Hills, Badlands, and Sand Hills are more Western to me than Midwest. Also, to me the southern parts of Missouri are more Southern than Midwestern, and perhaps Little Egypt in Illinois as well. Cincinnati is Midwestern, Louisville is Southern.

Basically, my Midwest is the region planted by grain crops (wheat, corn, soybeans, etc.) and including the North Woods.
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  #23  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2010, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by cowboytx26 View Post
I think cities in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, Iowa, and maybe Kentucky and Kansas are midwest cities. I would add Pittsburgh to the list. I think that Minnesota and Wisconsin are Upper Midwest.
I would also consider these states as Midwest. Minnesota is definitely upper Midwest but it is Midwest. I am of the opinion that these states are beautiful. I absolutely love the nature there. I think I will visit Minnesota in summer once again. Just love it there.
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  #24  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2010, 4:22 AM
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Bone Thugs member layzie bone when asked if he would resolve beef (who originated fast flowing first) with Twista and both rep the midwest together... "He (twista) can have the midwest, We aint from the midwest, we from Cleveland, east 99 and st. clair..."

On a more serious note, I agree with the Great Lakes/Rust Belt and Plains distinction. There are nuances though to be sure.
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  #25  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2010, 5:59 AM
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Having lived in both Michigan and Ohio, I've always considered myself midwestern. However, after living outside the 'midwest', I realized I had to identify myself as from the Great Lakes, or else people would think I grew up on some farm in the middle of the plains.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
As an outsider, this pretty much matches my my idea of the Midwest.

I'd throw in St. Louis and accept that Pittsburgh is probably more Appalachia than Midwestern.


src: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...USA-states.PNG
Big Ten map??
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  #26  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2010, 9:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Clevelumbus View Post
Having lived in both Michigan and Ohio, I've always considered myself midwestern. However, after living outside the 'midwest', I realized I had to identify myself as from the Great Lakes, or else people would think I grew up on some farm in the middle of the plains.



Big Ten map??
I just noticed the link as well, haha. Not for long if expansion comes to fruition! Re: rutgers, Uconn, syracuse, texas....
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  #27  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2010, 11:35 PM
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The midwest is such a strange term, in that even for me, a midwesterner, it conjurs images of tractors and corn - I'm looking out of my window and not seeing any tractors (although soon I will be planting corn next to the alley). The midwest I know is an interesting patchwork of both urban and rural fiefdoms of varying size and power, all with more personality than many on the coasts would ever acknowledge. I definitely don't agree with that map Brickell posted, as population wise, states like Nebraska are crowded against their eastern borders in very midwestern cities, and Kansas City isnt anything but midwestern. I think there are some breaks like somewhere along the Ozark plateau, or the vicinity of the Ohio, but not anything as clear as a state line in most cases. Louisville, for instance, is definitely a bit of a hybrid place.

Last edited by Centropolis; Mar 15, 2010 at 11:54 PM.
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  #28  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 11:13 PM
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I think of the midwest as the 'second' phase of American expansion after the original states. Though there's exceptions. The Mountain West contains cities like Salt Lake and Denver, or basically those cities located within the huge Rocky Mountain range. Denver can be a little weird because it's basically the beginning of the Rocky's and the end of the plains. The hardest to gauge though is the sunbelt.

Some place Phoenix and Vegas in the Mountain West when they have much more characteristics of a sunbelt city. The same goes for most of Texas. They seem more sunbelt then midwest. Actually, they seem like neither - Texas is its own category. I think again it has to do with the time period the areas and cities were settled.
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  #29  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 11:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FerrariEnzo View Post
Bone Thugs member layzie bone when asked if he would resolve beef (who originated fast flowing first) with Twista and both rep the midwest together... "He (twista) can have the midwest, We aint from the midwest, we from Cleveland, east 99 and st. clair..."

On a more serious note, I agree with the Great Lakes/Rust Belt and Plains distinction. There are nuances though to be sure.
With lyrics in mind, Kayne West, a native Chicagoan says 'You know what the midwest is? Young and restless', thereby implying Chicago is the midwest, not Great Lakes or rust belt.
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  #30  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2010, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAnderson View Post
With lyrics in mind, Kayne West, a native Chicagoan says 'You know what the midwest is? Young and restless', thereby implying Chicago is the midwest, not Great Lakes or rust belt.
Well maybe he's a big fan or the Young and the Restless and didn't want to compromise the rhyming. "You know what the Great Lakes are? Young and... bizarre"
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  #31  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2010, 5:21 PM
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Originally Posted by TonyAnderson View Post
With lyrics in mind, Kayne West, a native Chicagoan says 'You know what the midwest is? Young and restless', thereby implying Chicago is the midwest, not Great Lakes or rust belt.
That has nothing to do with drawing a distinction where as the quote I supplied directly related to geography distinctions. In addition my quote was from an interview and not lyrics. Lastly, Kanye is a loser who's career got squashed by a 105 lb country singer...
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  #32  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2010, 5:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAnderson View Post
With lyrics in mind, Kayne West, a native Chicagoan says 'You know what the midwest is? Young and restless', thereby implying Chicago is the midwest, not Great Lakes or rust belt.

ummmmm, no. chicago is BOTH midwest and great lakes. it's not an either/or proposition; these various geographies hold overlapping territory.
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  #33  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2010, 5:27 AM
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You know, I was really trying to figure out whether he was joking, and just assumed he was so I left it alone. lol
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  #34  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2010, 7:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
As an outsider, this pretty much matches my my idea of the Midwest.

I'd throw in St. Louis and accept that Pittsburgh is probably more Appalachia than Midwestern.


src: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...USA-states.PNG
To me, I consider the states in blue to be the Mideast. East of there is the Appalachia & the Northeast. South of there is the South central. Everything between the blue states west of the Mississippi, north of Texas and east of the Rockies is the Midwest.

So the states in blue are the Mideastern states and everything southwest of those, which lie west of the Mississippi, north of Texas and east of the Rockies is the Midwest.


I'd divide the country up something close to this:
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Last edited by SnyderBock; Apr 16, 2010 at 8:26 AM.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2010, 3:56 AM
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I'm 3 months late to this party but wanted to add a little perspective from someone who grew up in the "west" and only later, after living in Boston, Tampa and Milwaukee came to understand the geographical and cultural significance of it all. A westerner is very different than a midwesterner. We don't have an intuitive sense for the power and amazing brevity of a summer storm front. We don't grow up amid fields of corn. Humidity is something other people talk about. Our rivers are your streams or canals. On the other hand, we spend a significant portion of our lives above 4000'. Your mountains aren't even our hills. 12" of water a year is a good year. 90 degrees feels OK here. Most of our lakes are reservoirs. We can ski and mountain climb by middle school. The soft sputtering of nighttime sprinklers is second nature. I wouldn't necessarily call it western pride, because our issues and problems are just as prevelant as any other region, but if you grew up in the west and have later lived for a significant amount of time in a different region of the US, you know you are a "westerner." In my mind, the midwest ends at Roosevelt Nat'l Park, Black Hills, the Rocky Mountain front range and then who knows what happens in Texas... I'm all about complexity and ambiguity, but with this issue there is little debate. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you need to spend a little time in Idaho, Montana, Utah, Arizona or Nevada. You'll figure it out. It's different here.
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  #36  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2010, 9:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetElvis View Post
I'm 3 months late to this party but wanted to add a little perspective from someone who grew up in the "west" and only later, after living in Boston, Tampa and Milwaukee came to understand the geographical and cultural significance of it all. A westerner is very different than a midwesterner. We don't have an intuitive sense for the power and amazing brevity of a summer storm front. We don't grow up amid fields of corn. Humidity is something other people talk about. Our rivers are your streams or canals. On the other hand, we spend a significant portion of our lives above 4000'. Your mountains aren't even our hills. 12" of water a year is a good year. 90 degrees feels OK here. Most of our lakes are reservoirs. We can ski and mountain climb by middle school. The soft sputtering of nighttime sprinklers is second nature. I wouldn't necessarily call it western pride, because our issues and problems are just as prevelant as any other region, but if you grew up in the west and have later lived for a significant amount of time in a different region of the US, you know you are a "westerner." In my mind, the midwest ends at Roosevelt Nat'l Park, Black Hills, the Rocky Mountain front range and then who knows what happens in Texas... I'm all about complexity and ambiguity, but with this issue there is little debate. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you need to spend a little time in Idaho, Montana, Utah, Arizona or Nevada. You'll figure it out. It's different here.
Yeah.

Denver isn't midwest. At all.

Sure it sits on the plains, but the culture seems to be western.



According to this, I've lived in 8 of those regions!
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  #37  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2010, 11:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Strange Meat View Post



According to this, I've lived in 8 of those regions!
That map's regions are more accurate than the Census Bureau's.
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  #38  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2010, 1:07 PM
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I think of the Midwest as the Ohio River over to the Dakotas and down to Kansas. Pretty much Chicago's historical sphere of influence. CO, Wyo and all of those are Rockies, Texas out west to AZ are SW, Pacific is Pacific, NE are the Yankee bastards, and SEC is the South.
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  #39  
Old Posted May 14, 2011, 6:59 AM
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MidWest as defined by the US Census Bureau



By the way, here's the 4 geographic areas recognized by the US Census Bureau
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  #40  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2011, 2:20 PM
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It is very critical for me understand the map.
Due to this reason i am not able to tell you any vital information.
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