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  #61  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2010, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
It is indeed cyperus papyrus. It is so ironic that you posted that picture, because today in Maple Ridge, in the town square, a smaller papyrus planted in the garden caught my attention, haha! Where about is that one?
its in new west along the walk there by the inn and condos
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  #62  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2011, 5:39 PM
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We can grow small windmill palms and Needle palms here in Windsor Ont. The small ones can go unprotected and the larger ones can survive with minimal protection. Well situated Needle palms can survive unprotected here for many years. there is one in a Detroit subburb that has survived for 30 years unprotected.
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  #63  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2011, 6:14 PM
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Interesting thread, I recall the numerous palms in Vancouver when I was there on several visits in years past. As far as natural environment, they felt entirely natural in the Vancouver area. I lived on the west coast during summer 07 to spring 08 and I clearly remember that region having a Mediterranean climate during the entire middle part of the year and is extremely dry, while out east you get lots of storms in the summer months. In Ontario I think it does feel a bit 'unnatural' by comparison, but I'm not opposed to trying to grow some if we can!

BTW, a lot of the Great Lakes beaches in the area have tropical-like grasses and the summers are warm enough here to give a nice feeling in the outdoors. Vancouver, from what I gather, is generally chillier during the summer months than southern Ontario because of it's relation to the cool north Pacific waters. But it is much milder during winter as we all know...

The summers aren't that cool here, I took a snapshot of this weather forecast back in July in the Buffalo and Niagara areas as an example of what it was like this year.



You rarely get that long of a period of consistently burning hot weather in Vancouver, no? 91F is 32C, and the humidex would generally be over 40 each day.
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  #64  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2011, 6:49 PM
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Originally Posted by OhioGuy View Post
I don't get this complaint. For the most part, the types of palms occurring in these photos are naturally found in colder climates. Just because some people associate palms with tropical climates doesn't take away the simple fact that this plant species has adapted over the course of time to be sustainable in less than tropical environments. And yet on the west coast of Canada, where the climate actually is quite mild, it's wrong for them to be grown there? Granted the palms aren't original to the area, but I'd be surprised if there are many locations anywhere in the world that *only* have growing plants that are original to their area. I think their use in the landscaping seen in some of these photos is quite nice.

(The banana palms seem a little more odd, but if people are willing to put in the work to have them there, I say more power to them... I'm all for increasing greenery within cities.)
Do the coastal areas of the US have pallm trees too? I haven't seen too many.
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  #65  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2011, 2:00 AM
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Well palm trees are not native to San Franciso either, (same with most of Europe where on can find them, and even areas such as South Africa the majority of the palms are not native) so you must not like them there as well.

So how do palms go with the land scape and architecture there?

Especially given that the biogeoclimate zone of Victoria and San Fran are far more similar than you think. Victoria is in the Douglas Fir, Arbutus, Garry Oak ecosystem with Garry Oak meadows. This is a common ecosystem found throughout Northern, and even central California along the coast. In fact one can even find the prickly pear cactus growing in the driest hillside of southern Vancouver Island. Again, it is classified as sub Mediterranean.

I also fail to see how it does not match the architecture since many of the buildings in these posts are quite similar to those found in California (especially the condos around English Bay, which have actually been used as Miami stand ins for several TV shows) Not to mention several of the buildings in the pictures also have red tiled roofs, very Mediterranean looking IMO.

I think it may simply go against your pre-conceived notion of Canada. I had a friend who came from Japan to Canada to study English and he really did not enjoy staying in Vancouver, because before he came into Canada he had it in his head that all Canadian cities were akin to small rural towns, so to him it was unfitting that Vancouver was a multi-million person city with large office towers and a metro system.

What I like to show in my photo threads is that not everywhere in Canada is the stereotypical "Canadian" image

Here is another photo thread I posted recently about the semi-desert regions in BC just 3 hours east of Vancouver:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=183264

Please take a look at that one as well

I think "destroycreate" is just upset because he got mugged in Vancouver and didn't even have the self-respect to chase the guy down.
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  #66  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2011, 1:59 PM
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Interesting to see palm trees in Vancouver. Quite different from those i see everyday here at home !
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  #67  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2011, 2:52 PM
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Nice thread. I love seeing palm trees on Canada's west coast!
I was surprised to see palms on the west coast of Scotland which is much further north than Vancouver, but the north Atlantic ocean currents keep the temperature moderate.
Another surprise was seeing a row of palms in Vienna, but I found out they wheel them into a conservatory for the winter.
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  #68  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2011, 3:44 PM
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^I had the same experience years ago in Torquay, in southwest England. Palm trees all around... Was an interesting experience.
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  #69  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2011, 4:38 PM
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Palms trees in Niagara on the Lake Ontario are getting more common. Some of my yard pics:







Other hardy tropicals that survive year round here:



















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  #70  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 12:15 AM
Toronto6A6B Toronto6A6B is offline
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I really like this thread and all the pictures, they are beautiful !

I hope southern Ontario could grow these palm trees, especially the Windmill Palms.

Thank you for posting the pictures.
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  #71  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 1:06 AM
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Cool thread! I must say I really enjoy these palm trees in Vancouver, really gives that town a zing.

Does anyone know when palm trees were first brought to Vancouver? What the 50's?
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  #72  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 2:04 AM
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Thanks for bumping this thread ~ it's perfect timing.
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  #73  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 2:27 AM
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Out of all my picture threads, this one has the most legs, haha. So seeing how this thread is still alive, I may as well post some new palm tree pictures I took of Vancouver over this winter here:

All these pics were taken this winter (2011 - 2012)



Here is a close up of the fruit. Windmill palm have self planted themselves in the mildest parts of Metro-Vancouver and on southern Vancouver Island (usually within the same yard that the parent trees are located). And while windmill palms themselves may survive in the most suitable of sites in southern Ontario (in a more stunted variety as well), I can guarantee they will not produce fruit, due to the fact that their reproductive organs die at much milder temperatures that the trees themselves.



I love this intersection, looks like California.







These ones are starting to get pretty tall.





All pics are my own:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30634635@N03/page4/


PS - I have actually toyed with the idea of making a "Palm Trees of Vancouver" book one day, maybe when I get some more photos to choose from.
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  #74  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 4:52 AM
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Maybe with global warming even Philadelphia will have palm trees in the future. But it wold look kinda weird. Anyway, I liked the photos.
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  #75  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 5:20 AM
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I noticed DC has a couple of palm trees in front of the Air & Space museum. I'll take a photo next time I'm there.
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  #76  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 5:40 PM
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Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
I really dislike the idea of palm trees in Canada. It just seems so unnatural and doesn't go with the landscape/architecture in any way.
There are numerous cities around the world including San Francisco where they aren't native to the area.

It does seem kind of weird, but to me they're just like adding park benches or art, etc...
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  #77  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 6:45 PM
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SW Ontario: Windmill palms survive ?

Hi Metro-One,

Thanks for posting more pictures of Windmill palms, especially pictures in the winter.

I really enjoyed the pictures you posted, along with others. Had I not found your thread, I would never have realized there are palms trees in Canada, thanks for creating this thread.

Do you know where else in BC these windmill palms survive outdoors in terms of areas colder than Vancouver (zone 8a).

I am trying to see if they will survive outdoors without protection in southern and SW Ontario in the future.

Toronto: 6a (not downtown)
Toronto: 6b (downtown, near lake Ontario)
Niagara region: 6b
Windsor/SW Ontario: 6b-7a
St Catharines just West of Niagara Falls: 7a Surprise !

I am hoping one day when tourists from the US visiting SW Ontario or Niagara Falls will exclaim (as your earlier post) "Wow, Ontario has palm trees ... ! "

Thank you !

Last edited by Toronto6A6B; Mar 9, 2012 at 7:30 PM. Reason: Added one paragraph
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  #78  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 6:56 PM
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DC zone 7a: Palm trees survive ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 202_Cyclist View Post
I noticed DC has a couple of palm trees in front of the Air & Space museum. I'll take a photo next time I'm there.
Really ? Could you post some pictures when you have them, thanks !

This is the latest USDA zone map.
http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/#

That's encouraging because according to this map, DC is in zone 7a (similar to St Catharines Ontario, Windsor Ontario). So if palm trees survive in DC, it might survive in SW or St Catharines Ontario.

Last edited by Toronto6A6B; Mar 9, 2012 at 7:27 PM.
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  #79  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 7:48 PM
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Quote:
Really ? Could you post some pictures when you have them, thanks !
Here is the link from the City-data website:
http://www.city-data.com/forum/south...rees-sc-4.html

This is from three years ago and I just noticed the trees last week, so they're still alive. There are also two more palm trees in front of either the Smithsonian or the National Gallery.
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  #80  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2012, 8:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Toronto6A6B View Post
Hi Metro-One,

Thanks for posting more pictures of Windmill palms, especially pictures in the winter.

I really enjoyed the pictures you posted, along with others. Had I not found your thread, I would never have realized there are palms trees in Canada, thanks for creating this thread.

Do you know where else in BC these windmill palms survive outdoors in terms of areas colder than Vancouver (zone 8a).

I am trying to see if they will survive outdoors without protection in southern and SW Ontario in the future.

Toronto: 6a (not downtown)
Toronto: 6b (downtown, near lake Ontario)
Niagara region: 6b
Windsor/SW Ontario: 6b-7a
St Catharines just West of Niagara Falls: 7a Surprise !

As far as I know there is no 7a zone in Southern Ontario. At least the Natural Resources Canada site don't show it, but it does show the very small 5b area on the South shore of Montreal which is no bigger than downtown Toronto. (this is the only 5b zone in Quebec, aside from the Magdalene islands)


atlas.nrcan.gc.ca
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