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  #1761  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2016, 12:20 PM
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I love it!
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  #1762  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2016, 2:10 PM
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That'd be a great addition!
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  #1763  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2016, 11:05 PM
ArizonaGuy ArizonaGuy is offline
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Hopefully it gets past the Historic and Design Review committee.

A friend of mine who works for the SA Express News posted entire article earlier. A snippet from that article that caught my attention.
"Designed by world-renowned architecture firm Pelli Clarke Pelli, the tower has an octagonal footprint that tapers in at the top. Its walls rise 400 feet high, culminating in a crown unlike anything else in San Antonio’s skyline. The tower’s sharp edges, meant to increase the number of corner offices, will be lit at night by a pinstripe of LED lights."

That roof line shape outlined with LED lights would look great at night.

Let's hope this building rises!
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  #1764  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2016, 4:59 AM
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http://www.mysanantonio.com/real-est...ry-8399276.php


New Frost Tower building clears first regulatory hurdle

Quote:
The Frost Tower, a proposed state-of-the-art skyscraper that is seen as a turning point for the effort to redevelop downtown, passed its first hurdle in the city’s design approval process Wednesday.

The San Antonio Historic and Design Review Commission unanimously approved the 23-story tower, designed by renowned international architecture firm Pelli Clarke Pelli, on a vote of 8-0. Local developer Weston Urban, which is building the tower with Dallas firm KDC, will return for final approval in the fall.

City staff recommended giving the tower the go-ahead, as long as the developers provide more detail before final approval on its landscaping, the facades of the parking garage and the LED pinstripe lights that will run along its sides. They are also required to perform an archaeological investigation of the site.

The tower, which will occupy 2.8 acres at the northwest corner of Houston Street and Flores Street, will serve as a new headquarters for Frost Bank, which will sell its current 23-story headquarters to the city. It be the first office tower built downtown since 1989, when the 32-story Weston Centre was built.

It will increase the amount of prestigious class A space downtown by 400,000 square feet, or 20 percent. A six-story parking garage with more than 900 spaces will wrap around the building, with 20,000 square feet of retail space on the ground level that Weston Urban hopes to fill with high-end shops.

For more on this story, visit ExpressNews.com or read the Thursday edition of the San Antonio Express-News.

rwebner@express-news.net
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  #1765  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2016, 5:09 PM
The Best Forumer The Best Forumer is offline
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Wow this is good news for SA!
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  #1766  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2016, 9:25 PM
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Originally Posted by The Best Forumer View Post
Wow this is good news for SA!
I agree! I couldn't find the full article that I posted but that shows the good news at least. The full article states that they're waiting for or wanting more renderings of what the street level will be like with landscaping etc.

I really hope this building goes up. The San Antonio skyline needs a new look.
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  #1767  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2017, 12:39 AM
tripjammer tripjammer is offline
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Anything new and cool being build in SA this year?
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  #1768  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2017, 11:50 PM
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Frost Bank Tower

http://news4sanantonio.com/news/loca...r-on-wednesday

Looks like San Antonio is officially getting its newest high rise downtown!

From News4 WOAI
"Official groundbreaking for new Frost Bank Tower set for Wednesday

SAN ANTONIO —
You may have already seen some construction work, but Wednesday is the official groundbreaking for a new Frost Bank Tower.

The skyscraper will change San Antonio's skyline. City leaders hope it will help attract more businesses and tourism. The groundbreaking ceremony for the new Cullen-Frost Bank Tower will take place around 1:30 p.m. at Houston Street and Travis Street.

In 2015, the City of San Antonio entered a deal with Frost Bank and Weston Urban. The public-private deal involved the sale of several buildings. The city spent about $50 million to buy the old Frost Bank Tower to get more office and parking space.

Weston Urban and partners will develop the new 23-story Frost Tower, and provide some mix-use units, including residential space. This is the first new high-rise in the area since 1989.

This transformation is helping the city reach its goal of creating an urban core, offering Downtown space for work, living and recreation.

"I think we are well on our way to having a Downtown that really is vibrant, that's 24-7, and a place for San Antonians,” said Mayor Ivy Taylor. “Tourists want to be in authentic places where people live."

The new Frost Tower will have more than 430,000 square feet of office space with a parking garage. Construction is expected to be done in 2019."

Last edited by ArizonaGuy; Mar 29, 2017 at 11:56 PM. Reason: Added link to story
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  #1769  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2017, 3:50 AM
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I will be updating this page soon with many new towers and downtown projects planned for the S.A. CBD.
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  #1770  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2017, 6:22 PM
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http://news4sanantonio.com/news/loca...in-san-antonio
Quote:
Proposal made to build the largest Ferris wheel in the world in San Antonio

by Camilla RambaldiTuesday, November 28th 2017

SAN ANTONIO - The Federal Aviation Administration has a received a proposal to build a 900- foot-tall Ferris wheel in the Alamo City.

According to the agency’s website, a request was made to conduct a study to build the massive structure. It was submitted in early October.

The location of the Ferris wheel would be south of the Lone Star Brewery, near Loop 410 and Mission Trail, according to FAA’s website.
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  #1771  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2018, 10:28 PM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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The last meaningful post in this thread was one year ago. Is ANYTHING happening in San Antonio?

Austin, Dallas, Houston - all booming, development-wise. Austin - a city with a smaller population, that lacks a professional sports team and a has smaller geographic area than San Antonio has a downtown skyline that has been completely transformed and is unrecognizable compared to what it looked like in 2000. Houston continues to build 600+ footers, both uptown and downtown. My understanding is that uptown and downtown Dallas have several notable high rise project in the works.

I am perplexed as to the lack of activity in the paltry level of skyscraper / high rise development in San Antonio, the state's third largest city / U.S.A.'s seventh largest city (by city - non MSA - population). The economy seems to be prospering - why does the city's skyline not reflect this? Other U.S. cities whose economies have thrived less than San Antonio's in recent years (Milwaukee, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, etc.), yet have also historically been known to have relatively underwhelming skylines are all experiencing far more development in their respective downtowns / urban cores.

Can anyone explain what's (not) going on in San Antonio? It's one thing to have a strong desire to preserve a city's historical landmarks, buildings and other structures - NYC, Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles all do this well. Why must San Antonio do so at the expense of developing a skyline that reflects its population, tourism stats, cultural influence and economic prosperity?
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  #1772  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2018, 11:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
The last meaningful post in this thread was one year ago. Is ANYTHING happening in San Antonio?

Austin, Dallas, Houston - all booming, development-wise. Austin - a city with a smaller population, that lacks a professional sports team and a has smaller geographic area than San Antonio has a downtown skyline that has been completely transformed and is unrecognizable compared to what it looked like in 2000. Houston continues to build 600+ footers, both uptown and downtown. My understanding is that uptown and downtown Dallas have several notable high rise project in the works.

I am perplexed as to the lack of activity in the paltry level of skyscraper / high rise development in San Antonio, the state's third largest city / U.S.A.'s seventh largest city (by city - non MSA - population). The economy seems to be prospering - why does the city's skyline not reflect this? Other U.S. cities whose economies have thrived less than San Antonio's in recent years (Milwaukee, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, etc.), yet have also historically been known to have relatively underwhelming skylines are all experiencing far more development in their respective downtowns / urban cores.

Can anyone explain what's (not) going on in San Antonio? It's one thing to have a strong desire to preserve a city's historical landmarks, buildings and other structures - NYC, Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles all do this well. Why must San Antonio do so at the expense of developing a skyline that reflects its population, tourism stats, cultural influence and economic prosperity?
I’ve also wondered. The frost tower will be nice addition for SA. It’s 400ft I think.
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  #1773  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 12:42 AM
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Canopy by Hilton

24 fl | 247 ft



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Originally Posted by deeger View Post
Progress update: 3.26.18


They've removed the covered sidewalk that was next to the construction site on St. Mary's and put in this larger barrier. Trucks are pulling in here to haul away dirt.


Boring holes into the side as part of foundation work I guess?




Clearing out the pit. (pardon my fat finger).
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  #1774  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 12:49 AM
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Thompson Hotel & Residences

21 fl | 273 ft



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Originally Posted by deeger View Post
Some pics of dirt from today.







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  #1775  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 12:52 AM
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Mixed-Income Apartments in the Works for Historic Friedrich Property

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The Friedrich Lofts would have one- and two-bedroom units, 173 of which would be market rate and 174 of which would be affordable – meaning those units will be priced for people earning 60 percent to 80 percent of the area’s median income (AMI). The plan is still preliminary, and depends on a number of financial factors, but developers told the board that rents for affordable units would range from $667 to $1,144. The average market-rate unit would be about $1,400. There will be 14 units for 60 percent AMI residents and 160 units for 80 percent AMI residents.


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  #1776  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 1:33 AM
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The city is undergoing a major face lift. While other Texas cities are seeing more of a demand in highrise living, San Antonio is undergoing lots of low to midsize apartments with a few highrises U/C. San Antonio first all glass office tower is starting to take shape.




Photo credit: The Model

So that saying San Antonio has all brown & beige skyline is false.
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  #1777  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 5:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Urbannizer View Post
Thanks for the updates. Good to know SOMETHING is finally happening in San Antonio.

Must say, I'm not impressed by the designs of the Canopy by Hilton or the Thompson. Seems as though the top heavy, slender rectangular look is the trend in a few cities at the moment; I feel like we'll look back on it in 20-30 years and say "ugh, that looks SO 2016-2018". And their proposed heights - 247 feet and 273 feet, respectively, isn't anything to be excited about, in my opinion.

It's also unfortunate that Frost, a regional bank headquartered in San Antonio, decided to top out its new building at 23 stories / 400 feet. That's 116 feet SHORTER than the Frost building in Austin, and, quite frankly, wouldn't even be noticeable in the downtown Houston or the downtown Dallas skylines.

So my initial question remains: what prevents San Antonio, a city in a very prosperous state, from seeing the type of recent high rise / skyscraper development seen in other cities historically known for having relatively smaller skylines (Milwaukee, Salt Lake City, Phoenix)? ESPECIALLY considering what's happening in the other three major Texas cities (Houston, Dallas, Austin)? And is this ever likely to change, or will San Antonio's skyline essentially be the "San Jose, CA" of Texas for eternity?
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  #1778  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 5:52 PM
The Best Forumer The Best Forumer is offline
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nice updates...
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  #1779  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 6:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
Thanks for the updates. Good to know SOMETHING is finally happening in San Antonio.

Must say, I'm not impressed by the designs of the Canopy by Hilton or the Thompson. Seems as though the top heavy, slender rectangular look is the trend in a few cities at the moment; I feel like we'll look back on it in 20-30 years and say "ugh, that looks SO 2016-2018". And their proposed heights - 247 feet and 273 feet, respectively, isn't anything to be excited about, in my opinion.

It's also unfortunate that Frost, a regional bank headquartered in San Antonio, decided to top out its new building at 23 stories / 400 feet. That's 116 feet SHORTER than the Frost building in Austin, and, quite frankly, wouldn't even be noticeable in the downtown Houston or the downtown Dallas skylines.

So my initial question remains: what prevents San Antonio, a city in a very prosperous state, from seeing the type of recent high rise / skyscraper development seen in other cities historically known for having relatively smaller skylines (Milwaukee, Salt Lake City, Phoenix)? ESPECIALLY considering what's happening in the other three major Texas cities (Houston, Dallas, Austin)? And is this ever likely to change, or will San Antonio's skyline essentially be the "San Jose, CA" of Texas for eternity?
I find both the buildings you mentioned to be quite eye catching and I enjoy looking at them.

Also, having a skyline not grow, even with current prosperity, is the least of developers' concern. Why? Because it's irrelevant to most people and the market, specially in a city not known for skyscrapers and an internationally recognizeable skyline.

You worry too much about it.
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  #1780  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2018, 6:54 PM
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Quote:
Thanks for the updates. Good to know SOMETHING is finally happening in San Antonio.

Must say, I'm not impressed by the designs of the Canopy by Hilton or the Thompson. Seems as though the top heavy, slender rectangular look is the trend in a few cities at the moment; I feel like we'll look back on it in 20-30 years and say "ugh, that looks SO 2016-2018". And their proposed heights - 247 feet and 273 feet, respectively, isn't anything to be excited about, in my opinion.

It's also unfortunate that Frost, a regional bank headquartered in San Antonio, decided to top out its new building at 23 stories / 400 feet. That's 116 feet SHORTER than the Frost building in Austin, and, quite frankly, wouldn't even be noticeable in the downtown Houston or the downtown Dallas skylines.

So my initial question remains: what prevents San Antonio, a city in a very prosperous state, from seeing the type of recent high rise / skyscraper development seen in other cities historically known for having relatively smaller skylines (Milwaukee, Salt Lake City, Phoenix)? ESPECIALLY considering what's happening in the other three major Texas cities (Houston, Dallas, Austin)? And is this ever likely to change, or will San Antonio's skyline essentially be the "San Jose, CA" of Texas for eternity?]
I've followed SA on this thread for the last 10+ years as I'm originally from there. The dynamics in SA are quite a bit different than the other 3 majors in Texas. Houston, Dallas, Austin all have big job creating sectors such as Tech, O&G, Finance, etc... Although SA has some of that, its not to the extent of any of those cities. It is still heavily military, with (correct me if I'm wrong) Insurance and some energy and service industry mixed in. SA I believe is JUST getting to the point that its picking up steam... Think Austin in the late 80's early 90's. Tech is starting to take notice of SA due to its lower cost of living and good proximity to Austin, but I think we are still a decade or more away from seeing the tech industry really grasp the idea of SA. Also, within the Tech realm, Austin really owes a ton of its growth to one company... Dell. Dell is THE reason IMHO that Austin boomed. Dell got big, other companies moved in to supply Dell and then other companies started piling in to get first dibs on UT graduates with Comp Science degrees. It really was a perfect "storm" per se, where as SA doesn't really have a "Dell". To speak to your comment on the differences in height in the Frost towers... it all has to do with economics and ROI at the time of inception. Frost in Austin (again, correct me if I'm wrong) was supposed to be taller... but after the 9/11 attacks and subsequent economic downturn, was shortened to adjust to the economics of the time.

SO, is SA the "San Jose" of Texas? No, SA has and will always be its own city, with its own industries and certainly its own unique culture. Will we ever see SA get the type of development that Austin, Dallas and Houston are seeing? Maybe? but maybe not! And that's not necessarily a bad thing. There are some cool things happening in SA a la the Pearl, Southtown, Lower Brodway etc. These are all areas that are seeing really cool projects that, although not splashy high rises, contribute to the resurgence of areas of town that a decade ago were veritable waste lands while maintaining the character of the city.
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