HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #561  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:02 PM
Austinlee's Avatar
Austinlee Austinlee is offline
Chillin' in The Burgh
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Spring Hill, Pittsburgh
Posts: 12,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergrey View Post
Healthy Ride bike share network seeing major expansion. See the map here:

https://healthyridepgh.com/expansion/
Sweet! I can't help but think to myself that that map would be nearly identical to a map of almost all new developments in the city. It's roughly half or so of the city proper but covers nearly all of the new construction.
__________________
Check out the newest developments in The Burgh. Pittsburgh Rundown II

"Even Old New York was once New Amsterdam"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #562  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:52 PM
Evergrey's Avatar
Evergrey Evergrey is offline
Eurosceptic
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 24,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Austinlee View Post
Sweet! I can't help but think to myself that that map would be nearly identical to a map of almost all new developments in the city. It's roughly half or so of the city proper but covers nearly all of the new construction.
That's no coincidence. This network covers all the most topographically favorable sections of the city. I tend to think of the city less as "North Side" vs "South Side" etc... but instead I conceptualize Pittsburgh as two very different cities based on topography... hills vs. flats

1) Flat riverfront neighborhoods + East End plateau (represented almost perfectly by the Bike Share network): These are neighborhoods of relatively gentle topography that are much more easily develop-able and are home to the city's most dynamic demographics, extensive business districts and hottest property markets. Almost all of the city's bike infrastructure exists in these neighborhoods. These are a mix of traditionally wealthy, leafy East End neighborhoods, up-and-coming rowhouse and warehouse neighborhoods that have rebounded from the steel hangover (S. Side Flats, Strip/Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Mexican War Streets, etc.), and centrally-located revitalized transport/retail hubs (East Liberty).

2) Rugged hilltop / ravine neighborhoods: These areas dominate the northern half of the North Side, the West End, everything south of the Mon except for the SouthSide Flats, Hill District, etc.. These are neighborhoods with difficult access and limited development potential due to extreme topography. While there are occasional high-priced properties due to sweeping vistas, most of these areas are stagnant. Low values, low incomes, older, etc. These neighborhoods are largely un-bike-able except for advanced cyclists (think of the "Dirty Dozen" race that takes place on the steepest streets in the city). Business districts are mostly small to non-existent (though the South Hills has some notable stretches). The neighborhoods are quiet residential havens with little to no development momentum. Landslides and subsidence threaten many properties.


As a Deutschtown resident... I've observed this dichotomy in my own life. While the North Side often tries to portray a 'unified front' of 18 neighborhoods... Old Allegheny City... as a resident of the flat part of the North Side next to Downtown... I find my life is far more plugged in to Downtown, Strip, Lawrenceville, South Side and East End than the hilltop neighborhoods of the North Side. Fineview may be a literal stone's throw from my place... but I can't remember the last time I've been up there.

Other than Riverview Park... what reason would compel most people from Deutschtown, Mexican War Streets, Manchester, etc. to travel up the hills into Perry, Fineview, Marshall-Shadeland, Spring Hill, etc.?

Of course, this is an asymmetrical dynamic. Since almost all the attractions and businesses are located in the flat neighborhoods... the hilltop residents have many reasons to come down to the flat neighborhoods.


Btw... this is not to denigrate hilltop neighborhoods... the hills define Pittsburgh's character. The relentless topography is problematic in many ways... but I certainly wouldn't give it up to be some generic Midwestern city with lots of room for exit ramps. lol
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #563  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:01 PM
GeneW's Avatar
GeneW GeneW is offline
Northsider
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergrey View Post
That's no coincidence. This network covers all the most topographically favorable sections of the city. I tend to think of the city less as "North Side" vs "South Side" etc... but instead I conceptualize Pittsburgh as two very different cities based on topography... hills vs. flats

1) Flat riverfront neighborhoods + East End plateau (represented almost perfectly by the Bike Share network): These are neighborhoods of relatively gentle topography that are much more easily develop-able and are home to the city's most dynamic demographics, extensive business districts and hottest property markets. Almost all of the city's bike infrastructure exists in these neighborhoods. These are a mix of traditionally wealthy, leafy East End neighborhoods, up-and-coming rowhouse and warehouse neighborhoods that have rebounded from the steel hangover (S. Side Flats, Strip/Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Mexican War Streets, etc.), and centrally-located revitalized transport/retail hubs (East Liberty).

2) Rugged hilltop / ravine neighborhoods: These areas dominate the northern half of the North Side, the West End, everything south of the Mon except for the SouthSide Flats, Hill District, etc.. These are neighborhoods with difficult access and limited development potential due to extreme topography. While there are occasional high-priced properties due to sweeping vistas, most of these areas are stagnant. Low values, low incomes, older, etc. These neighborhoods are largely un-bike-able except for advanced cyclists (think of the "Dirty Dozen" race that takes place on the steepest streets in the city). Business districts are mostly small to non-existent (though the South Hills has some notable stretches). The neighborhoods are quiet residential havens with little to no development momentum. Landslides and subsidence threaten many properties.


As a Deutschtown resident... I've observed this dichotomy in my own life. While the North Side often tries to portray a 'unified front' of 18 neighborhoods... Old Allegheny City... as a resident of the flat part of the North Side next to Downtown... I find my life is far more plugged in to Downtown, Strip, Lawrenceville, South Side and East End than the hilltop neighborhoods of the North Side. Fineview may be a literal stone's throw from my place... but I can't remember the last time I've been up there.

Other than Riverview Park... what reason would compel most people from Deutschtown, Mexican War Streets, Manchester, etc. to travel up the hills into Perry, Fineview, Marshall-Shadeland, Spring Hill, etc.?

Of course, this is an asymmetrical dynamic. Since almost all the attractions and businesses are located in the flat neighborhoods... the hilltop residents have many reasons to come down to the flat neighborhoods.


Btw... this is not to denigrate hilltop neighborhoods... the hills define Pittsburgh's character. The relentless topography is problematic in many ways... but I certainly wouldn't give it up to be some generic Midwestern city with lots of room for exit ramps. lol

I definitely think of Manchester, Allegheny West, Allegheny Center, Central Northside and Deutschtown as basically one collective neighborhood.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #564  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:03 PM
Urbanthusiat's Avatar
Urbanthusiat Urbanthusiat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: University City, Philadelphia
Posts: 420
Amazon expansion on South Side to add 125 jobs

Quote:
E-commerce giant Amazon confirmed it is expanding its operations at SouthSide Works, where it plans to add 125 jobs in fields that include machine translation and speech science.

This expansion in the development on Sidney Street will more than double the company’s current tech workforce in Pittsburgh, the company said.

The Seattle-based company said it has secured an additional 22,000 square feet to expand its existing office in the SouthSide Works building. The Post-Gazette reported the possible expansion of its existing 15,200-square-foot space earlier this month.

Amazon opened the corporate office in January 2017 with about 50 employees working on projects that include Amazon web services, machine translation and Alexa, the company's voice-controlled intelligent assistant.

Pittsburgh is a finalist for HQ2, a project that Amazon has said could bring up to 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in investment over 17 years. Other finalists include Philadelphia; Columbus, Ohio; Newark, N.J.; Boston; and more than one location in the Washington, D.C., area.

The company stated the expansion at SouthSide Works is unrelated to its search for a second headquarters and that it is part of its ongoing job creation efforts and planned growth in Pittsburgh.

“Since day one at Amazon in Pittsburgh, we’ve been focused on expanding our pool of local technical talent as well as investing in the community. From machine translation engineers to Alexa speech scientists, our Pittsburgh employees love inventing every day on the behalf of customers,” said Bill Kaper, general manager of Amazon’s Pittsburgh office.
From: http://www.post-gazette.com/business...s/201802200107
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #565  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:13 PM
Austinlee's Avatar
Austinlee Austinlee is offline
Chillin' in The Burgh
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Spring Hill, Pittsburgh
Posts: 12,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergrey View Post
That's no coincidence. This network covers all the most topographically favorable sections of the city. I tend to think of the city less as "North Side" vs "South Side" etc... but instead I conceptualize Pittsburgh as two very different cities based on topography... hills vs. flats

1) Flat riverfront neighborhoods + East End plateau (represented almost perfectly by the Bike Share network): These are neighborhoods of relatively gentle topography that are much more easily develop-able and are home to the city's most dynamic demographics, extensive business districts and hottest property markets. Almost all of the city's bike infrastructure exists in these neighborhoods. These are a mix of traditionally wealthy, leafy East End neighborhoods, up-and-coming rowhouse and warehouse neighborhoods that have rebounded from the steel hangover (S. Side Flats, Strip/Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Mexican War Streets, etc.), and centrally-located revitalized transport/retail hubs (East Liberty).

2) Rugged hilltop / ravine neighborhoods: These areas dominate the northern half of the North Side, the West End, everything south of the Mon except for the SouthSide Flats, Hill District, etc.. These are neighborhoods with difficult access and limited development potential due to extreme topography. While there are occasional high-priced properties due to sweeping vistas, most of these areas are stagnant. Low values, low incomes, older, etc. These neighborhoods are largely un-bike-able except for advanced cyclists (think of the "Dirty Dozen" race that takes place on the steepest streets in the city). Business districts are mostly small to non-existent (though the South Hills has some notable stretches). The neighborhoods are quiet residential havens with little to no development momentum. Landslides and subsidence threaten many properties.


As a Deutschtown resident... I've observed this dichotomy in my own life. While the North Side often tries to portray a 'unified front' of 18 neighborhoods... Old Allegheny City... as a resident of the flat part of the North Side next to Downtown... I find my life is far more plugged in to Downtown, Strip, Lawrenceville, South Side and East End than the hilltop neighborhoods of the North Side. Fineview may be a literal stone's throw from my place... but I can't remember the last time I've been up there.

Other than Riverview Park... what reason would compel most people from Deutschtown, Mexican War Streets, Manchester, etc. to travel up the hills into Perry, Fineview, Marshall-Shadeland, Spring Hill, etc.?

Of course, this is an asymmetrical dynamic. Since almost all the attractions and businesses are located in the flat neighborhoods... the hilltop residents have many reasons to come down to the flat neighborhoods.


Btw... this is not to denigrate hilltop neighborhoods... the hills define Pittsburgh's character. The relentless topography is problematic in many ways... but I certainly wouldn't give it up to be some generic Midwestern city with lots of room for exit ramps. lol
Great synopsis Bob.

Regarding what you said about little to no reason to go to the hilltop neighborhoods; I agree. If there is no business district then there really is no draw for non-neighborhood residents. That also highlights what I kinda like about living in one of those hilltop neighborhoods. I love dropping down to The Strip to eat at a restaurant or shopping or whatever and leave all the traffic issues down there and return to a quiet, unassuming residential area. I prefer that than to live on some busy boulevard with traffic jams, road noise, honking, etc.
I do enjoy the scenic nature of the local topography but sometimes I get frustrated thinking about how much of an advantage certain flat, featureless cities have for new construction and redevelopment of their cities.
__________________
Check out the newest developments in The Burgh. Pittsburgh Rundown II

"Even Old New York was once New Amsterdam"
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:42 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.