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  #81  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2018, 6:53 AM
aberdeen5698 aberdeen5698 is offline
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Originally Posted by Trainguy View Post
Tunnels require regular inspections and maintenance in addition to the electricity costs associated with powering the ventilation fans.
Well regular open air track requires inspection and maintenance too, is it really that much more expensive because it's in a tunnel?

Electricity costs I can see, although you only need to run the fans for relatively brief periods during and shortly after a train transits the tunnel, which is only what - around a dozen times a day for that route? I'd be surprised if it was all that expensive relative to the value of moving the goods through it.

It just seems to me like that must be a pretty tiny piece of the puzzle compared to everything else. I've gotta believe that it would probably take many, many decades of operation for those kinds of expenses to get anywhere near the construction cost and land acquisition costs.
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  #82  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2018, 9:10 AM
Trainguy Trainguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aberdeen5698 View Post
Well regular open air track requires inspection and maintenance too, is it really that much more expensive because it's in a tunnel?

Electricity costs I can see, although you only need to run the fans for relatively brief periods during and shortly after a train transits the tunnel, which is only what - around a dozen times a day for that route? I'd be surprised if it was all that expensive relative to the value of moving the goods through it.

It just seems to me like that must be a pretty tiny piece of the puzzle compared to everything else. I've gotta believe that it would probably take many, many decades of operation for those kinds of expenses to get anywhere near the construction cost and land acquisition costs.

I am talking about maintenance on the tunnel structure itself in addition to the regular maintenance on the track structure.
Also consider it takes time to clear a tunnel of diesel exhaust before another train can pass through. That limits the frequency of traffic flow. It takes around 30 minutes to clear the Mt McDonald tunnel.
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  #83  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2018, 9:29 AM
jollyburger jollyburger is offline
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Originally Posted by Trainguy View Post
I am talking about maintenance on the tunnel structure itself in addition to the regular maintenance on the track structure.
Also consider it takes time to clear a tunnel of diesel exhaust before another train can pass through. That limits the frequency of traffic flow. It takes around 30 minutes to clear the Mt McDonald tunnel.
Thornton Tunnel takes 20 but they want to add more fans to lower than to 10 minutes.

http://vancouversun.com/business/loc...fic-congestion
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  #84  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2018, 1:48 AM
Trainguy Trainguy is offline
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I guess the Province doesn't think $300, 000 is worth it since the rail line will never move anyway.

Province Denies $300,000 Ask for Rail Route Study

White Rock British Columbia - White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin will be writing to B.C.'s transport minister to urge reconsideration of a decision not to contribute funds for a joint study looking at relocating the BNSF route off the waterfront.

In a 24 Jan 2018 letter sent to both Baldwin and Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner, Claire Trevena said "at this time, the ministry is unable to provide funding" for the study.

Surrey had been asking, on behalf of both cities, for a $300,000 provincial contribution to the estimated $900,000 for the study.

White Rock is to contribute $75,000 and Surrey, $225,000, with a further $300,000 requested from the federal government.

On Monday night Baldwin sought, and gained, council approval to draft a letter in response, "in light of the recent slides on the track."

Mudslides on 29 Jan 2018 and the early morning of 30 Jan 2018 following heavy rainfall, prompted BNSF to impose temporary track closures which affected the Bellingham to Vancouver passenger service, as well as freight service.

Baldwin said there had been a total of six separate mudslides on the track between White Rock and Crescent Beach in that period.

"It's $300,000, it's not a lot of money to the province," he told Peace Arch News following the meeting.

"This is a potential loss-of-life situation."

Surrey transportation manager Jaime Boan said he thinks his city will likely "have further dialogue with the provincial government" on the decision, acknowledging that it will delay the spring 2018 to March 2019 time line originally hoped for.

"We're obviously disappointed," he said.

"We have had response in the past that indicated support from the province."

In her letter, Trevena said that while she recognized the importance of improving rail safety to both cities, "the BNSF is a federally-regulated railway that falls under the safety oversight of Transport Canada, and consideration of the railway safety impacts of relocating the corridor resides with Transport Canada."

Boan said that while the point is understood, he feels that issues about the route's safety could not only affect goods movement, impacting the provincial economy, but also pose "an environmental and community safety risk that fits within the provincial mandate."

He said the city will be "actively pursuing" the federal component of the funding, applied for last August and not yet confirmed, in spite of encouragement to apply from federal transportation Minister Marc Garneau, over the next few months.

Boan noted that this year's slides are far from isolated incidents.

"There have been many mudslides on the tracks over the years," he said.

"From the BNSF perspective, they feel they are able to manage the risk. From the city side, it is a concern."

The idea of relocating the shoreline route was raised by the cities in a joint community forum hosted by then-Surrey mayor Dianne Watts and Baldwin in 2013.

It was also the subject of a series of hearings before the federal Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure, and Communities in Ottawa in 2016, urged by Watts, who served as MP for South Surrey-White Rock before resigning in 2017 for her failed bid to become BC Liberal leader.

Alex Browne.
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  #85  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2018, 1:05 AM
Trainguy Trainguy is offline
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Here we go again!! Keep dreaming because it will never happen!! No one will fund a billion dollar relocation project.


Surrey Councillor Renews Call to Move Crescent Beach Rail Line

Crescent Beach British Columbia - A Surrey councillor is renewing calls for a study into moving railway lines in the Crescent Beach area of the city.

It comes after a freight train broke down on Saturday, blocking the two access points to Crescent Beach, a popular draw for tourists and day trippers on Boundary Bay.

"Basically, the community is trapped," said Coun. Judy Villeneuve on Sunday.

"So it's our goal to get the railway to move, but until then they have to be called upon when they're dealing with those kinds of mistakes."

Just after 15:00 PT Saturday a train suffered mechanical issues and came to a dead stop, blocking access to and from the community.

Vehicles were lined up for around two hours until the problem with the train was solved.

That was a concern for local restaurant owner Stephen Lodge, who had to do without three staff who couldn't make it to work.

But he was also worried about emergency situations.

"My biggest concern was if anyone was to hurt themselves, an ambulance couldn't get down," he said.

"All the guys in the kitchen, I was like, don't touch a knife... you can't get out of here... that was my biggest worry."

Number of Trains has Grown

First responders can call ahead to Burlington Nothern Santa Fe (BNSF), which owns the rail line, to have trains stopped if they are heading to Crescent Beach for an emergency.

However, that wouldn't have helped in this instance.

"So we think it's in the best interest of the rail to move," Villeneuve said.

"The number of trains has grown too extensively."

Villeneuve, who has been a city councillor for 30 years, says the number of trains coming through has grown from five or six in a 24 hour period to more than 20.

The trains can take up to eight minutes to pass through Crescent Beach.

For a number of years the City of Surrey has been calling for a railway relocation study, which has a price tag of around $900,000.

Villeneuve says the city needs the province to partner with it on the study.

The argument for relocation is not just about better access for the community, Villeneuve says, adding that there have been slides along slopes where the train passes.

She also notes concern about rising ocean levels.

In the meantime BNSF says it is investigating what happened to the train that broke down.

Chad Pawson.
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  #86  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2018, 3:34 AM
dharper dharper is offline
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It would be a lot cheaper to build an over/underpass to access Crescent Beach, than to move the entire rail line.
But of course access to Crescent Beach is only the current excuse to get the rail line moved.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2018, 3:54 AM
SgtNeonPanda SgtNeonPanda is offline
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Plus, Surrey is considering buying out the homes in Crescent Beach in the long-run due to concerns around rising sea levels.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...ange-1.4675432
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  #88  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2018, 4:22 AM
dharper dharper is offline
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It would be far cheaper to take the properties over after they flood, rather than buying them out before they flood.
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