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  #21  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2014, 3:55 PM
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^ I think that lull in the 90s had to do with a lot of transferring between companies. Particularly from UTDC to Lavalin, before Bombardier.

The Okinawa line will likely use a Japanese variant - these were developed in the 80s around the same time as UTDC's trains, with systems now running in Tokyo, Osaka, Kobe, Yokohama and Fukuoka and another being built in Sendai opening next year. Technically, it's all the same linear motor technology - probably to be compatible, there'd need only be modifications in varying power collection.

Noteworthily though, the whole driverless component including the particular ATC component of ICTS did take off and is in hundreds of systems around the world now.
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  #22  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2014, 3:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kisai View Post
How long till we see Malcom repeat the "Skytrain is Obsolete" story in another local paper and someone rubs this in his face?
Haha I know. If you look at the case study on page 14 (linked in article), you'll see pictures comparing Bombardier ART vehicles to tram vehicles and see that it actually did win largely over a Tram-Train style line. However, multiple rapid transit types - including BRT, among other things - were all compared on a level playing field (page 15).

Probably soon by the way, at least in Surrey. Some guy (not me) submitted a SkyTrain vs LRT letter into the Leader that he's probably already typing some sort of rhetorical response to. I could've written it better.
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  #23  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2014, 12:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kisai View Post
How long till we see Malcom repeat the "Skytrain is Obsolete" story in another local paper and someone rubs this in his face?
No, he'll make some poorly written allusion, using German words people don't know the meaning of, to how the people of Japan were fooled into accepting death camps by the Skytrain-neo-nazi-globalization-conglomerate.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2014, 1:50 AM
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The trend continues:

NEW SKYTRAIN TECHNOLOGY METRO IN SENDAI, JAPAN ON TRACK TO OPEN 2015

A brand new rail rapid transit line in Sendai, Japan – which is using linear induction motor propulsion technology (“SkyTrain technology”) – is on track to open next year (2015), with final construction activities and train testing underway. The Tozai Line will be 14km long, and feature a mix of underground and elevated sections.



Info video:
Video Link


See link for more info and construction pictures
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  #25  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2014, 4:10 AM
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And again:
SkyTrain technology declared for 60km outer belt metro in Tokyo

SkyTrain technology (linear motor propulsion, with automated operation) has been declared for a major investment in rail rapid transit in the outer boroughs of the city of Tokyo, Japan – the world’s largest metropolitan area with over 38 million people residing.
CASE STUDY LINK: 平成25年 – 度区部周辺部環状公共交通に係る調査 – 概報告
English: 2013 Fiscal –Outer Ward Circumferential Public Transit Study – Summary Report




Interestingly they're actually reverting to a Mark I-esque 12m car length as with Okinawa, now citing that it will allow for even smaller tunnels and tighter curve radii. I can imagine that as with Vancouver, some lines will allow for interoperability of these trains.

Top: Standard rotary subway car; middle: 16m "Kannawa" linear motor spec (Yokohama, Fukuoka, Kobe, etc); bottom: new "Smart Linear Metro" spec (Okinawa, Tokyo)



Kawasaki is also considering SkyTrain tech for their proposed metro (finding 26% in capital cost savings) - but as far as I'm aware it's a close tie with a standard rotary metro, because the latter would allow for through-running with some existing JR and private railway lines, which would improve the business case.

Last edited by xd_1771; Dec 7, 2014 at 4:24 AM.
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  #26  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2014, 6:13 AM
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Should this thread be renamed to something like "SkyTrain technology around the world."?
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  #27  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2014, 8:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOSS View Post
Should this thread be renamed to something like "SkyTrain technology around the world."?
"The Skytrain is not Obsolete! Metros around the world that use technology popularized by the Skytrain."

Or something like that.

There's three key parts that make our "Skytrain" unique
1) LIM guideway and motors
2) Unattended Train Operation (UTO) "Seltrac"
3) And the rollingstock designs (ICTS MK I, ART(MK II), and Innovia Metro 300 (MK III) that have steerable axles.
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  #28  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2014, 12:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOSS View Post
Should this thread be renamed to something like "SkyTrain technology around the world."?
Maybe "Metros using Linear Induction Motors"
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  #29  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2014, 10:02 PM
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Linear Motors have been used in Japan for about as long as in Vancouver. In addition, they have a linear induction mag-lev in Aichi that they showcased in 2005 for the Expo. That thing is smooth as butter and sounds like SkyTrain (the distinctive linear motor sound).

I know Sendai is using rolling stock from Kinki Sharyo, not Bombardier. I'd be surprised if Okinawa was using Bombardier trains, frankly. It's rare that Japanese companies offer an open tender, they usually pick the company and then work together with the rail manufacturer to develop the trains.

Here's the line in Osaka. Note the 4th rail (power) comes from a fixed caternary above the train.

Video Link
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  #30  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2014, 2:36 AM
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Thanks for the thread name change.
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  #31  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2014, 2:54 AM
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No problem
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  #32  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2018, 10:55 AM
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Just recalled the existence of this thread. Gonna repost this here from MVTD thread, which is where I previously posted it: Delhi Metro Rail Corporation releases report with an express recommendation that linear motor propulsion be used on a new light metro line to be built in the city of Thiruvananthapuram.
Quote:
New DPR finds Light Metro ‘viable and socially justified’

New technology suggested in report will reduce costs

The Delhi Metro Rail Corporation’s (DMRC) reworked Detailed Project Report (DPR) for Light Metro in the cities of Thiruvananthapuram and Kozhikode has found the project ‘viable and socially justified’ and that it has the needed ridership.

The DPR was revised as per the parameters of Metro Rail Policy-2017 under the supervision of Principal Adviser, DMRC, E. Sreedharan and is awaiting the government’s nod since November 2017. The Financial Internal Rate of Return (FIRR), an indicator to measure return on investment, based on the revised costs and additional revenues, for Thiruvananthapuram has gone up to 7.24% and 8.66% for Kozhikode.

The reworked Economic Internal Rate of Return (EIRR), a tool for advocating investments, has gone up to 17.25% for the capital city’s project and 17.61% for Kozhikode. “It is comfortably above the datum base of 14% indicated in the Metro policy and the two projects are socially justified,” says the DPR.

Another significant change is the recommendation for the Linear Induction Motor (LIM) technology for the rolling stock to negotiate sharp curves up to 60 m and a steep gradient up to 6%. The use of LIM technology will reduce the axle load to 9 tonnes leading to about 4% savings in civil structures and track costs along the 35.12-km corridor in the two cities. There will be considerable savings in the operation and maintenance costs.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper...le22973608.ece
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