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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 1:07 AM
megadude megadude is offline
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Odd names of cities & towns after amalgamating

In the last couple of years during my road trips, I've started to take notice of signs with really long town names. Obviously, most of these names came about from the wave of town amalgamations that were occurring all over.

Here are some examples. Some I've seen and most I'm looking at on wikipedia:

Leeds and Grenville
Lennox and Addington
Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry
Admaston/Bromley
Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh
Bradford West Gwillimbury
Havelock-Belmont-Methuen
Killaloe, Hagarty and Richards
Macdonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional
Whitchurch-Stouffville
Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Guilford, Harburn, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre and Clyde


There are several more like this in Ontario.

In the 70s, many towns of the GTA amalgamated to become the cities we know today. Brampton, Mississauga, Markham, Oakville, etc. were all mergers of existing towns and villages and simply took the name of the biggest village or a new name was chosen.

The wave of amalgamations that took place in the late 90s to early 2000s was more complex in terms of the naming process.

I wasn't paying attention to local political affairs at the time, but I believe Ottawa and Hamilton absorbed a few communities during this time, and obviously, the names weren't changing.

But there were many small towns that merged. I have no idea how many of these mergers followed the 70s naming convention of one name, but many did not.

I am curious to know if anyone can tell me how these long names came to be? Was there so much local pride in each community that each one just had to have their name in the municipality's official name? Or did the province or county choose it from the get go so as to appease everyone and not waste time debating the new name?

Are these long names present on all municipal documentation? Is this what shows up on property tax bills? Does the mayor always say the long name when addressing the crowd at the town fair?


Another thing I noticed is, instead of quirky names, there are unimaginative directional names like Centre Wellington and Wellington North in Wellington County.

Then there's Perth County (from wikipedia):
The county includes:
Municipality of North Perth, 2011 population 12,631
Township of Perth East, 2011 population 12,028
Township of Perth South, 2011 population 3,993
Municipality of West Perth, 2011 population 8,919
Town of St. Marys, 2011 population 6,655, and City of Stratford, 2011 population 30,886, with independent municipal governments

Then there's the confusion of Bruce County. Notice the two Souths (from wikipedia):
Bruce County comprises eight municipalities (in population order):
Town of Saugeen Shores
Municipality of Kincardine
Municipality of Brockton
Town of South Bruce Peninsula
Township of Huron-Kinloss
Municipality of Arran-Elderslie
Municipality of South Bruce
Municipality of Northern Bruce Peninsula


Ultimately, it seems the names themselves don't really matter that much to most people. The issue of services and taxes is a different story.

Anyway, residents I assume just simply say the name of their community and not municipality if someone asks where they live. After all, that community used to be it's own municipality.

Some places, people refer to the new name when talking to a non local and say the specific community when talking to a local.The most obvious examples of this:

The former cities comprising Metro Toronto (Scarboro, North York, York, East York, Etobicoke)
Mississauga (Port Credit, Malton, Streetsville, Clarkson, and Cooksville, though I don't think I ever hear people saying Cooksville, but rather say near Square one or mention their major intersection)
Brampton (Bramalea)
Caledon (Bolton)
Vaughan (Woodbridge, Maple, Thornhill, which is also in Markham)
Halton Hills (Acton, Georgetown)
Clarington (Bowmanville)
New Tecumseth (Alliston)

Hamilton absorbed a few towns not that long ago and it seems like I never hear those people say they're from Hamilton but rather Ancaster and Flamboro, for example.


What about in the rest of the country? Any similar examples? For the whole amalgamation thing and also referring to their community and not the municipality's name.

Last edited by megadude; Oct 16, 2017 at 7:45 AM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 1:36 AM
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I'm still lamenting over how Bastard Township was thrown into the lakes
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 1:46 AM
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Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Guilford, Harburn, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre and Clyde needs to accept that it's Haliburton, Ontario and be done with it.

Thunder Bay's largest rural municipality is "Oliver-Paipoonge". North of that is "Township of Dawson Road Lots". Algoma District near Sault Ste. Marie has "Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional" which is kind of weird, why not just call it Tarbutt? Geographically speaking, Thunder Bay includes the townships of Neebing and Neebing Additonal but Neebing Additional became Fort William 125 years ago, so the only people that use it are surveyors and MPAC. The Municipality of Neebing doesn't include the Township of Neebing (the Township of Neebing is now entirely in Thunder Bay) or the Neebing River, but it used to. Pieces of it have been carved away over time to create Thunder Bay, primarily, the Township of Neebing.

Southwest of Thunder Bay is a Strange Township. Nearby is Scoble which isn't really unusual but very fun to say. It's below Paipoonge.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 1:53 AM
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Thunder Bay

Amalgamation of Port Arthur and Forth William.

Though it could have been The Lakehead, or Lakehead
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 2:01 AM
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They split the vote on purpose. The original plan was to make the entire 100,000sqkm district a single tier city like Greater Sudbury or Wood Buffalo.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 2:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Guilford, Harburn, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre and Clyde needs to accept that it's Haliburton, Ontario and be done with it.

Thunder Bay's largest rural municipality is "Oliver-Paipoonge". North of that is "Township of Dawson Road Lots". Algoma District near Sault Ste. Marie has "Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional" which is kind of weird, why not just call it Tarbutt? Geographically speaking, Thunder Bay includes the townships of Neebing and Neebing Additonal but Neebing Additional became Fort William 125 years ago, so the only people that use it are surveyors and MPAC. The Municipality of Neebing doesn't include the Township of Neebing (the Township of Neebing is now entirely in Thunder Bay) or the Neebing River, but it used to. Pieces of it have been carved away over time to create Thunder Bay, primarily, the Township of Neebing.

Southwest of Thunder Bay is a Strange Township. Nearby is Scoble which isn't really unusual but very fun to say. It's below Paipoonge.

Same deal with Pickering Village (from wikipedia):
When the Regional Municipality of Durham was created in 1974, the Village of Pickering was confusingly included in the Town of Ajax. It became known as "Pickering Village" to differentiate it from the Town of Pickering, which consisted of the remainder of the former Pickering Township.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 3:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Guilford, Harburn, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre and Clyde needs to accept that it's Haliburton, Ontario and be done with it.

Thunder Bay's largest rural municipality is "Oliver-Paipoonge". North of that is "Township of Dawson Road Lots". Algoma District near Sault Ste. Marie has "Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional" which is kind of weird, why not just call it Tarbutt? Geographically speaking, Thunder Bay includes the townships of Neebing and Neebing Additonal but Neebing Additional became Fort William 125 years ago, so the only people that use it are surveyors and MPAC. The Municipality of Neebing doesn't include the Township of Neebing (the Township of Neebing is now entirely in Thunder Bay) or the Neebing River, but it used to. Pieces of it have been carved away over time to create Thunder Bay, primarily, the Township of Neebing.

Southwest of Thunder Bay is a Strange Township. Nearby is Scoble which isn't really unusual but very fun to say. It's below Paipoonge.
My Grandmother who is in her 90s was born in Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional township! I always loved that name. Apparently, the municipal council had recently voted to change its name to just "Tarbutt Township."
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:13 AM
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Most of Winnipeg used to be a number of distinct and politically independent cities that were all united in 1972(?)Now, those cities are known as the districts of the city.

Let's see, there was (and sorta is)
St. Boniface
St. Vital
Fort Garry
Transcona
St. James
St. Norbert

There were others and while I know them I'm not entirely sure if they were independent or not (like the Kildonans)
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:46 AM
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Timmins has been a city since 1973 but before was a town and had nearby townships and unorganized townships.

-Town of Timmins

-Tisdale Township (Schumacher and South Porcupine)

-Whitney Township (Pottsville and Porcupine)

-Mountjoy Township

-very small unincorporated places: Kamiskotia, Hoyle, Connaught, Barbers Bay

-mining developments with neighbourhoods: Delnite, Buffalo Ankerite, Preston, Dome Extention, Pamour
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 9:09 AM
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We have some that are just combined names.

Longest is four:
Town of Small Point-Adam's Cove-Blackhead-Broad Cove

There are lots with three:
Town of Logy Bay-Middle Cove-Outer Cove
Town of Centreville-Wareham-Trinity
Town of Glenburnie-Birchy Head-Shoal Brook
Town of Harbour Main-Chapel's Cove-Lakeview
Town of Long Harbour-Mount Arlington Heights
Town of Lushes Bight-Beaumont-Beaumont North
Town of Mount Carmel-Mitchell's Brook-St. Catherine's
Town of Port au Port West-Agathuna-Felix Cove
Town of St. Vincent's-St. Stephen's-Peter's River

There are many that only have two names, such as:
Town of Heart's Delight-Islington
Town of Hermitage-Sandyville
Town of Irishtown-Summerside
Town of Renews-Cappahayden
Town of Rose Blanche-Harbour le Cou
Etc.

And some that created new names for a region:
Town of Trinity Bay North
Town of Millertown-Head of Bay d'Espoir
Town of New-Wes-Valley (Combines Newtown, Wesleyville, and Valleyview)
Etc.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 11:39 AM
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On 1 January 1991, Sarnia and the neighbouring town of Clearwater (formerly Sarnia Township) were amalgamated as the new city of Sarnia-Clearwater. The amalgamation was originally slated to include the village of Point Edward, although that village's residents resisted and were eventually permitted to remain independent of the city. On 1 January 1992, the city reverted to the name Sarnia.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 1:35 PM
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Just remembered. I visit someone at their cottage on Buckhorn Lake every year. They're in the community of Kawartha Hideaway, which was formerly part of a town. That cottage was knocked down and he built a house and now lives there. He was confused as to where he now lived. Turns out it's Trent Lakes.

From wikipedia:

In 1998 the Township of Galway-Cavendish and the Township of Harvey were amalgamated by Minister's Order to become Galway-Cavendish and Harvey. The Municipality of Trent Lakes adopted its new name by By-law B2013-017 on February 19, 2013. The name was in recognition of the Trent-Severn Waterway which plays a major role in the cottage history and tourism economy of the area.

So it seems some places have gotten away from the burdensome names and are adopting names that roll more easily off the tongue.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 1:43 PM
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I also noticed this on wikipedia:

Prior to its restructuring as a city, the area was known as Victoria County. The city was created in 2001, during the ruling provincial Progressive Conservative party's "Common Sense Revolution". Through provincial legislation, the former Victoria County and its constituent municipalities were amalgamated into one entity named the City of Kawartha Lakes.

By a narrow margin (51% for, 49% against), the citizens of Kawartha Lakes voted to de-amalgamate in a November 2003 local plebiscite, but the provincial and municipal governments have not taken any steps since the vote to initiate de-amalgamation.



I had no idea until now that Lindsay is no longer it's own town. It's now City of Kawartha Lakes along with other towns. I think the other two communities you might assume are their own towns are Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon. Have always heard those names mentioned going back 25 years from people who cottage and fish around there. Particularly the latter because of the Tragically Hip.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 2:47 PM
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Gatineau is still a weird one for me. It should have been Hull.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 3:52 PM
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Gatineau is still a weird one for me. It should have been Hull.
Hull was not really a pretty name and it was heavily stigmatized for all sorts of reasons (crime, sleaze, etc.)

Gatineau was an OK choice. It's as old a name in local history as Hull was (actually older), is more reflective of the fact that the city is francophone, and plus the old city of Gatineau had 40,000 more people than the old city of Hull.

I wouldn't have minded something like Hull-sur-Gatineau or Hull-sur-la-Gatineau (in reference to the Gatineau River), though.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:24 PM
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The area I live in has seen a bunch of successive mergers over the decades, before arriving at today's mega () Gatineau.

About 40 years ago, the old city of Gatineau was created from a bunch of smaller municipalities, including four with the word Templeton as part of their name: Templeton, Templeton-Ouest, Templeton-Est and the wonderfully complicated Templeton-Est-Partie-Est. You can't get more east than that.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:40 PM
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Sure, but Hull is the oldest part of the city and it's breathing heart. It was really weird when it was no longer Hull. It was like if suddenly Ottawa was called Kanata.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:52 PM
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Some of Montreal's boroughs have had long ass names since the 2002 merger.

Borough of Rivière-des-Prairies-Pointe-aux-Trembles
Borough of Côte-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grâce
Borough of Villeray-Saint-Michel-Parc-Extension
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:53 PM
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Sure, but Hull is the oldest part of the city and it's breathing heart. It was really weird when it was no longer Hull. It was like if suddenly Ottawa was called Kanata.
I wasn't sad to see it go. Too many plays on words with Hull/Hell... Hull in the UK isn't a particularly nice city either...

Anyway, Hull still lives on in lots of instances like Le Vieux-Hull, Les Galeries de Hull, l'Île-de-Hull, etc.

Even at Gatineau Olympiques games the fans still chant GO 'ULL GO.
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Old Posted Oct 16, 2017, 4:57 PM
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