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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 4:17 PM
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2017 State Population Estimates - Released 12/20/17

https://www.census.gov/newsroom/pres...tes-idaho.html

DEC. 20, 2017 — Idaho was the nation’s fastest-growing state over the last year. Its population increased 2.2 percent to 1.7 million from July 1, 2016, to July 1, 2017, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s national and state population estimates released today.

Following Idaho for the largest percentage increases in population were: Nevada (2.0 percent), Utah (1.9 percent), Washington (1.7 percent), and Florida along with Arizona (1.6 percent).

“Domestic migration drove change in the two fastest-growing states, Idaho and Nevada, while an excess of births over deaths played a major part in the growth of the third fastest-growing state, Utah,” said Luke Rogers, Chief of the Population Estimates Branch.

All 50 states, PR and DC: https://www2.census.gov/programs-sur...st2017-05.xlsx
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  #2  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:05 PM
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Top numerical gains:
1) Texas
2) Florida
3) California
4) Washington
5) North Carolina
6) Georgia
7) Arizona
8) Colorado
9) Tennessee
10) South Carolina

Illinois had the largest decline.
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  #3  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
Top numerical gains:
1) Texas
2) Florida
3) California
4) Washington
5) North Carolina
6) Georgia
7) Arizona
8) Colorado
9) Tennessee
10) South Carolina

Illinois had the largest decline.
Pretty poor showing for Illinois and it's entirely due to huge negative domestic migration without a large enough positive international migration to offset it, like is the case for New York and California. Immigrants just don't come to Chicago anymore.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:53 PM
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Illinois had the largest decline.
i can't really speak for chicagoland (which is arguably in a different region entirely than outstate illinois), but im very familiar with outstate illinois south of I-80, and it's sort of like one huge rustbelt city spread out. tons of small cities (including but often smaller than the decaturs, etc) that had one or two huge factories that closed, resulting in a decades long downward spiral. unlike larger regions, theres literally no where else to work...so you have all of these towns that have thousands more people than the local economy can support at middle class levels...and tourism is by and large non-existent compared to say michigan or wisconsin.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:08 PM
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You can see the strength of manufacturing in the latest numbers. Ohio and Michigan had impressive growth for Midwest standards.

States with population losses are scattered throughout. Louisiana, Mississippi, West Virginia, Illinois, Wyoming, Hawaii, North Dakota, Alaska, all had population losses.
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  #6  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:11 PM
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Change by region:

South +1235k
West: +766k
Midwest: +201k
Northeast: +111k

A little surprised the Midwest grew by more than the Northeast.
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  #7  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kngkyle View Post
Change by region:

South +1235k
West: +766k
Midwest: +201k
Northeast: +111k

A little surprised the Midwest grew by more than the Northeast.
Michigan and Ohio had impressive growth, and the Census-derived "Northeast" classification cuts off the fastest growing part of the Northeast Corridor (the DC area).

If you compare "Northeast Corridor" to Midwest, the corridor would have faster growth.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kngkyle View Post
Change by region:

South +1235k
West: +766k
Midwest: +201k
Northeast: +111k

A little surprised the Midwest grew by more than the Northeast.
Yeah I saw that too. Take a look at the domestic migration figures:

Northeast: -313,643
Midwest: -156,897
South: 356,884
West: 113,656
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:11 PM
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In the South there's an interesting trend to take note of.

MS, LA are declining. AL has low growth. And then you have GA, NC, SC, FL, TN and TX with high numerical gains.
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Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 12:25 AM
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In the South there's an interesting trend to take note of.

MS, LA are declining. AL has low growth. And then you have GA, NC, SC, FL, TN and TX with high numerical gains.
I was just glad to see that we (Alabama) maintained positive domestic and international migration growth. International migration was actually higher than domestic.
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  #11  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:17 PM
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West Virginia and Maine have negative replacement rates - deaths greater than births. Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Florida are all positive but not by much.

At the other end of the spectrum, Utah has 3.1 births for each death. Alaska is at 2.5, Texas at 2.1. The Mormons are multiplying, ahhhh.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Kngkyle View Post
West Virginia and Maine have negative replacement rates - deaths greater than births. Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Florida are all positive but not by much.

At the other end of the spectrum, Utah has 3.1 births for each death. Alaska is at 2.5, Texas at 2.1. The Mormons are multiplying, ahhhh.
Interesting about Alaska considering they still managed to have a decline in population.
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  #13  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 7:09 PM
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Interesting about Alaska considering they still managed to have a decline in population.
That's from the huge (for our population) domestic outflow. The oil downturn has throttled the state's economy, and not many people are willing to put up with the cold and darkness of winter if they aren't making oil work salaries.

I wonder if Louisiana's downturn is oil as well.
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Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 4:05 AM
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Originally Posted by ChiSoxRox View Post
That's from the huge (for our population) domestic outflow. The oil downturn has throttled the state's economy, and not many people are willing to put up with the cold and darkness of winter if they aren't making oil work salaries.

I wonder if Louisiana's downturn is oil as well.
The top 5 oil-producing states and population gain/loss:
1. Texas 399,734
2. North Dakota -155
3. California 240,177
4. Alaska -1,727
5. Oklahoma 9,657

The top 5 natural gas-producing states and population gain/loss:
1. Texas 399,734
2. Pennsylvania 18,452
3. Oklahoma 9,657
4. Louisiana -1,824
5. Wyoming -5,595
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  #15  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:20 PM
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FL and NC should actually counted under NY since they are mostly made up of NY'ers at this point.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:23 PM
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FL and NC should actually counted under NY since they are mostly made up of NY'ers at this point.
Same with certain parts of NC and SC. Charleston and Raleigh-Durham probably have more Long Islanders and New Jerseyans at this point than Southerners, and I'm pretty sure Charlotte is loaded with Upstate NY and PA folks.

Spent two work weeks in suburban Raleigh this fall, and I swear it's like Long Island relocated to this town called Cary. It's dirt-cheap for NE corridor standards, rather pretty, and tons of high paying tech jobs in companies like SAS. But you have to like brand-new sprawl; there's nothing remotely urban or old.

Not sure if I heard a Southern accent on a white person in two weeks, but I heard NY, Philly and Boston accents. I barely hear NY accents anymore in NY. Probably have to head to FL or NC in the future if you want to hear old-school Brooklynese.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:33 PM
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^ A lot of "us" on the Gulf side too. I have a niece and cousin in around the Tampa/St. Pete area. Step-mothers parents lived Ocala.

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Same with certain parts of NC and SC. Charleston and Raleigh-Durham probably have more Long Islanders and New Jerseyans at this point than Southerners, and I'm pretty sure Charlotte is loaded with Upstate NY and PA folks.

Spent two work weeks in suburban Raleigh this fall, and I swear it's like Long Island relocated to this town called Cary. It's dirt-cheap for NE corridor standards, rather pretty, and tons of high paying tech jobs in companies like SAS. But you have to like brand-new sprawl; there's nothing remotely urban or old.

Not sure if I heard a Southern accent on a white person in two weeks, but I heard NY, Philly and Boston accents. I barely hear NY accents anymore in NY. Probably have to head to FL or NC in the future if you want to hear old-school Brooklynese.
Last time I was in NC (couple of years ago) orange NY plates outnumbered NC plates. It was nuts. I bet there are more Bills/ Giants fans there than Panthers.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:40 PM
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^ A lot of "us" on the Gulf side too. I have a niece and cousin in around the Tampa/St. Pete area. Step-mothers parents lived Ocala.
And Orlando is also huge NE corridor, though tends to be Hispanic Northeasterners (especially PR), as opposed to the stereotypical Jewish-Italian Long Island crowd in Boca or wherever.
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  #19  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:52 PM
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And Orlando is also huge NE corridor, though tends to be Hispanic Northeasterners (especially PR), as opposed to the stereotypical Jewish-Italian Long Island crowd in Boca or wherever.
Orlando definitely. My brother almost moved there about 10 years ago because his former in-laws moved down there. When I think of Boca..Morty and Helen Seinfeld pop into mind. I don't even count FL as it's own state anymore. It's NY with alligators and hurricanes and we just let the Floridians, Cubans and Midwestern snowbirds stay there.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2017, 5:27 PM
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FL and NC should actually counted under NY since they are mostly made up of NY'ers at this point.
it depends on which coast.

atlantic coast florida if filled with northeasterners, but gulf coast florida is loaded with folks from ohio, michigan, illinois, etc.

every former chicagolander that i've known who has moved to florida (relatives and friend's retiring parents) has moved to gulf coast florida 9 times out of 10.
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Dec 20, 2017 at 5:38 PM.
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