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  #41  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 2:23 AM
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  #42  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 4:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
When in the Sam Heck was this picture taken?!

That middle car on the left is a Chevy Caprice Classic - c. 1984 [could be a Buick Le Sabre, but I'm fairly certain it's a Chevy].
It's definitely a Caprice.
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  #43  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 6:09 AM
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It's definitely a Caprice.
Also, take note of the shirtless dude on the right, with thigh highs and shin highs.

What is this California c. 2019?

Lol.
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  #44  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 9:14 AM
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  #45  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 3:33 PM
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Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
^ Paris has by far the best urban built environment on earth.

And that’s probably true about it making London seem larger. In reality central London isn’t that big, but that also makes it quite walkable.

Here’s Manhattan for comparison:



https://www.citymetric.com/skylines/...ne-london-1005
No central london and paris are similar sizes you can measure this on google maps, and not all of Manhattan is central New York, is mainly ends at midway up central park
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  #46  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 3:38 PM
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Yeah, the NA grid city layout is extremely boring and uninspiring. I really envy the way European and most Asian cities are laid out...so exciting to wander around and get lost in.
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  #47  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 3:52 PM
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Yeah, the NA grid city layout is extremely boring and uninspiring. I really envy the way European and most Asian cities are laid out...so exciting to wander around and get lost in.
Just wait a couple thousand years.
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  #48  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 4:06 PM
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Grids are more civilized and formal. They are superior in form and function, optimized for economic productivity.

Your silly medieval streets are fit for theme parks, not modern cities.
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  #49  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 4:19 PM
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Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
Grids are more civilized and formal. They are superior in form and function, optimized for economic productivity.

Your silly medieval streets are fit for theme parks, not modern cities.
This,

The two greatest powers the world has ever known operate off of grids and highways.
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  #50  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 5:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
Grids are more civilized and formal. They are superior in form and function, optimized for economic productivity.

Your silly medieval streets are fit for theme parks, not modern cities.
Did you need a crying bald eagle with that?

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  #51  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 8:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
Your silly medieval streets are fit for theme parks, not modern cities.
You say this as if grid city layouts are a modern invention or something.
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  #52  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 9:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
This,

The two greatest powers the world has ever known operate off of grids and highways.
I know one of these powers. What’s the other?


Other cities that I found to have irregular grid patterns are Paris, Rome, Milan, Athens,Rio, São Paulo, Sydney, Tokyo, and Havana. Some of these cities are in countries that have been a part of great nations and even empires.
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  #53  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 10:09 PM
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Are we arguing over which street patterns are better?

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  #54  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Are we arguing over which street patterns are better?

There is no argument

the grid reigns supreme
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  #55  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
There is no argument

the grid reigns supreme
"Supreme" only if you're waiting on your Papa John's order and the delivery driver has only been on the job a month...otherwise it's subjective. Two of my favorite cities; NYC and London have both examples and I don't think twice about their street patterns. It's an after thought...
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  #56  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:34 PM
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"Supreme" only if you're waiting on your Papa John's order and the delivery driver has only been on the job a month...otherwise it's subjective. Two of my favorite cities; NYC and London have both examples and I don't think twice about their street patterns. It's an after thought...
With NYC; the sheer mass of the buildings and the diversity in the Avenue streetscapes make up for the monotony of the grid. Meaning; Park, Lex, 5th, Madison are all so vastly different In their make up that its still exhilarating to explore, in spite of the straightness.

In addition, Manhattan has plenty of crazy windy urban streets equal in chaos to London (below 14th) that it has a best of both worlds typology.
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  #57  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
"Supreme" only if you're waiting on your Papa John's order and the delivery driver has only been on the job a month...otherwise it's subjective. Two of my favorite cities; NYC and London have both examples and I don't think twice about their street patterns. It's an after thought...
It wasn't an afterthought to our freemason founding fathers
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  #58  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by proghousehead View Post
With NYC; the sheer mass of the buildings and the diversity in the Avenue streetscapes make up for the monotony of the grid. Meaning; Park, Lex, 5th, Madison are all so vastly different In their make up that its still exhilarating to explore, in spite of the straightness.

In addition, Manhattan has plenty of crazy windy urban streets equal in chaos to London (below 14th) that it has a best of both worlds typology.
Good point. But if grids need Manhatten-level diversity and density than I think grids suck lol
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  #59  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2019, 1:05 AM
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Grids are easier. I spent the beginning of my career in New York in midtown, which obviously is on the grid. Much easier to get around, faster, ect. But boring. I'm not a fan of midtown.

I work in FiDi now, and it's mess getting around. Too crowded, no trash rooms for the buildings so the streets are perpetually filthy, but much more interesting. I love it even with it's downfalls.
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  #60  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2019, 4:19 AM
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Grids aren't necessarily more efficient, it really depends on the use. They probably do make Manhattan more efficient, and maybe Chicago, but it's argue that is only because Manhattan is long and thin, so there just aren't many 45 degree trips. Similarly, in Chicago, the density of the city is pushed up narrowly along the Lake, which is also where diagonals are also more common. I don't think it's a coincidence that some of the most popular neighborhoods away from the Lake are bisected by diagonal streets.

In an unbroken grid, and trip that requires you to go an equal distance North or South and East or West is, by the rules of geometry, 40% longer than perfectly point-to-point trip would be, whereas the worst trips in Paris rarely add more than 25%. In cars, this can be worse if measuring in time rather than distance, but the addition of grand avenues and boulevards linking the most important points reduces that while leaving shorter routes for the pedestrians and Metro. And once you realize that to optimize for car traffic density goes down, it becomes apparent that grids really increase the perception of efficiency more than they actually increase absolute efficiency.
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