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  #721  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2019, 7:43 PM
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Part of widening I-75 is reconfiguring the Big Beaver and 14 Mile interchanges into DDI or Diverging Diamond Interchanges. I never really thought the Big Beaver interchange was really congested enough to warrant a change in design, but I guess in the long-term if traffic is expected to increase then it'll probably be worthwhile to create a more efficient design now.



Quote:
Construction on I-75 in Oakland County is set to ramp up again next month with an 8.5-mile overhaul as well as the state's first carpool lane and two more interchange projects.

Segment two of the nearly $2 billion I-75 Modernization Project will include redoing the freeway from Coolidge Highway to 13 Mile Road.

That means traffic on that stretch will be reduced to two lanes each way. The downside is traffic delays; the upside is new roads and safer, innovative designs, such as the state's first carpool lane, Rob Morosi, spokesman for the Michigan Department of Transportation, said Monday morning during a media update.
https://www.crainsdetroit.com/infras...art-next-month
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  #722  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2019, 10:38 PM
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Report: Amtrak considers bringing back Detroit-Toronto train service

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A passenger rail connecting Detroit and Toronto is up for discussion in the future.

According to Curbed Detroit, Amtrak presented a plan and grant request to Congress for fiscal year 2020 that including a line item labeled, "restoration of the Detroit-Toronto Service." As for funding, the report listed it as "TBD."

Amtrak's annual report submitted to Congress did not include a construction timeline.

“Amtrak is exploring places it can modernize and expand its services and network,” Amtrak Spokesman Marc Magliari told Curbed Detroit. “A Chicago/Western Michigan–Detroit–Toronto corridor is one of the services where we see promise.”

Currently, there is a tunnel bus service that connects downtown Detroit to Windsor and then VIA rail to Toronto.
Like the Toledo rail connection, this is something that should have never stopped. It will be interesting to see what the new stations are in Detroit and Windsor if this is reinstated.
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  #723  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2019, 10:36 AM
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Update on the I-375 Removal. The project advisory committees met last in December on this one, and it looks like they've narrowed it down to the Alternative 5 refinement I've quoted above, with the partial local road (terminated at Monroe) on the Lafayette Park side. They've furthered refined that alternative by:
  • Further reducing the overall width of the boulevard from 105 feet to 99 feet.
  • They've evaluated the bicycling route along the boulevard and have decided for a two-way, 10-foot-wide off-street path on the east side of the boulevard, which will be sandwiched between a 5-foot wide median on the bounevard side and a 15.5-foot sidewalk on the far side.
  • On the west side of the boulevard will be a 25-foot wide sidewalk. Both sides of the boulevard will be landscaped.
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Originally Posted by Lmichigan View Post
North of Gratiot:

1. There will be a new off-ramp from southbound I-75 to Brush, and a new on-ramp from Brush to northbound I-75. The lanes from the Fisher Freeway (I-75 east-west) to the Chrysler Freeway (I-75 north-south) will be a much gentler curve, and will be a through-way and not a ramp since traffic will no longer access Gratiot on the other side. This whole thing, in fact, will have much gentler curves since the Gratiot Connector will be removed. This interchange has been a death-trap fro semis because of the ridiculouse curves. They'd never allow you to build anything like them today. Another big deal is that you finally get access from nortbound I-375 to the Fisher Freeway.
Refinements have also been made to the I-375/I-75 interchange alternative including:
  • The proposed addition of an auxillary lane from NB I-375 ramp at Brush. This would provide local access to the northbound I-75 service drive so you wouldn't have to stay on the freeway once you got on at Brush.
  • Conversely, they've added an auxillary lane from SB I-75 ramp at Mack to provide local access to Brush.
  • The southbound I-75 exit ramp onto Gratiot now includes options to exit onto Monroe and Gratiot individually. A large median has been added so that you can keep right and exit onto Monroe, or continue a short way south to a controlled exit at Gratiot.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/m...L_641619_7.pdf

Anyway, we're almost at the end of this. The full Environmental Assessment is planned for release to the public imminently, at which point we'll find out which revisions made it through and we'll have arrived at the Preferred Alternative. There will then be public hearings over the Spring. The Finding of No Significant Impact is scheduled to be completed by summer.

After that, it's simply about the MDOT fitting thing into their scheduled transit plan.
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  #724  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2019, 6:51 AM
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The I-94 Modernization project's "Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement" was released this week. Sounds like they took a lot of community advice on this one.

New draft for I-94 overhaul in Detroit includes less widening, better pedestrian bridges

Quote:
For years, MDOT has been working on a plan to modernize I-94 on the 6.7-mile stretch in Detroit between I-96 and Conner Avenue. Finally, the plan seems to be coming together.

In a recently released draft of its “Environmental Impact Statement,” which details how the project would affect residents, MDOT lays out its latest plans for the I-94 overhaul. Changes from previous the draft are pretty substantial.
Quote:
The plan has gone through several iterations since then, in large part due to community pushback on several key issues. In particular, residents didn’t like the widening of I-94’s footprint, which would result in too many building relocations, and the elimination of pedestrian bridges.

In the latest plan, both these issues are addressed.

Another lane will still be added in each direction on the freeway, as well as the shoulder widened. But to mitigate displacement and traffic routing issues, service drives will be redesigned and the total I-94 footprint won’t be as large as in previous plans. As a result, property displacement decreased by 61 percent for residential and 17 percent for commercial.
Quote:
In more positive news for cyclists and pedestrians, most non-motorized bridges will not only be kept, but converted into “complete street” bridges. Instead of narrow, elevated bridges accessible by ramp, nine bridges will have street-level access for all modes of transit and include both bike lanes and sidewalks.

Three new pedestrian bridges will even be added, including one at Connor Avenue for the Iron Belle Trail, part of Michigan’s 2,000-mile non-motorized trail network. Unfortunately, the Third Avenue bridge will be removed due to improvements made at the M-10 to I-94 interchange.

Even transit advocates like the Detroit Greenways Coalition are enthusiastic about the changes.
https://i94detroit.org/i94-project/dseis/

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  #725  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:56 PM
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Sad to see Macomb excluded but it's better than having it hold up transit for the whole region. While Oakland is now the big question mark but after the passing of L. Brooks Patterson and subsequent leadership change Pontiac is now acting like its finally ready to go all in on regional cooperation. Getting a real mostly regional transit system up and running asap is one of the most important steps Metro Detroit can make to keep up the momentum that's been building (with its willing partners). Transit ridership is up bucking a national trend & the region is belatedly embracing urbanism at the same time as Detroits comeback is spreading out into the keystone neighborhoods now is the time ... get 'er done!

Quote:
Southeast Michigan leaders devise new regional transit plan for 2020
And it involves excluding Macomb County

By Aaron Mondry
Curbed Detroit
Nov 20, 2019


The new plan does not involve the Regional Transit Authority, which has been working to update its own plan. (Last version shown below)



A well-funded regional transit system has been a dream of certain leaders in Southeast Michigan for years. A new plan announced this week could make that goal more likely by excluding the area’s most resistant partner: Macomb County.

Quote:
Current

Quote:
At a Monday news conference, Wayne County Executive Warren Evans, Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter, and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan announced a plan to ask the State Legislature to amend the Municipal Partnership Act of 2011, which allows for local municipalities to partner on services and raise taxes. Oakland, Washtenaw, and Wayne counties could then propose a tax millage on the 2020 ballot to fund regional transit.

Though the exact details of the bill will be released soon, Evans said that all three counties would have to vote in favor of the tax hike, or else the initiative would fail.

...

Leaving out Macomb is an obvious path forward, given the resistance by both leaders and residents. In the lead up to the 2016 RTA millage vote, former Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson and Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel expressed skepticism of the plan, and ultimately their counties voted against it. In Oakland, the vote failed about only 1,000 votes. But in Macomb, it was by nearly 75,000.

..

Coulter, who succeeded Patterson as Oakland County Executive, is firmly behind regional transit. There could always be the opportunity for Macomb to join the system at a later date.
https://detroit.curbed.com/2019/11/2...nsit-plan-2020
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