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  #21  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 3:52 AM
raisethehammer raisethehammer is offline
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Lol....
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  #22  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 5:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millstone View Post
I was almost ready to refute this somehow, but I really can't argue with "The Tim Hortons chain was founded in 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario."
I stand by my comment. I did not know if the company considered itself to have been founded in Hamilton or not ---- apparently it does.
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  #23  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 5:08 AM
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Originally Posted by raisethehammer View Post
LOL....so now you're telling us that Hortons WASN'T founded in Hamilton???
No. What I told you was that "the chain's first shop was located in Hamilton, but that does not necessarily mean it was 'founded' there." And that is completely true. The fact that it turns out the company does indeed consider itself to have been founded in Hamilton does not invalidate my statement in the least.

The location of a company's first shop does not necessarily match up with the location of the company's founding. Wal-Mart was founded in Rogers, Arkansas, but its first store was in Bentonville, Arkansas.
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  #24  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 6:23 AM
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The distinction between "founded in" and "first store" is kind of a moot point with Tim Hortons, isn't it?

The initial store was in Hamilton, and that's all anyone knows or cares about. Talks or whatever other preplanning went into the founding could have occurred in Kitchener or Madagascar for all anyone knows or cares.

Not that it makes much of a real difference to anyone that they're currently putting part of operations in an Ancaster business park, but if Tim Hortons chose to put headquarters here, it would be fitting and respect the history of the chain.

And they could probably do better than a display in one store... a Timmy's museum could be quite the destination. Like it or hate it, a lot of people have spent a lot of their life at Tim Hortons discussing things over coffee... and their slow-but-steady expansion has worked out well for the company... starting from Hamilton and radiating outwards.
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  #25  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 12:52 PM
raisethehammer raisethehammer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millstone View Post
I was almost ready to refute this somehow, but I really can't argue with "The Tim Hortons chain was founded in 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario."
Ted, believe me, none of us are shocked that you're "standing by your comment" despite reading what the company itself has to say on the matter.
We've come to expect it.
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  #26  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 1:13 PM
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Originally Posted by raisethehammer View Post
Ted, believe me, none of us are shocked that you're "standing by your comment" despite reading what the company itself has to say on the matter.
We've come to expect it.
Come to expect what? I did not claim that Tim Hortons was not founded in Hamilton ---- I merely stated that its founding location was not necessarily linked to the location of its first donut shop. Anyone with a base level of reading comprehension can see that.

And where the company was "founded" was not related to my point, which is that TH has no obligation to place its head offices in Hamilton regardless of where it was founded or where its first store was located.

I pride myself on integrity and accuracy when it comes to facts. I defy you to ever find a claim that I made that was incorrect. In the rare case where I am wrong, I do admit to it.

Are you going to dredge up your outright lies about me claiming that there are no trucks in downtown Hamilton yet again or are you simply going to ignore my question?
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  #27  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 1:31 PM
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Originally Posted by BCTed View Post
The chain's first shop was located it in Hamilton, but that does not necessarily mean it was "founded" there. I don't see why the head office "should" be in Hamilton.

The United States of America was "founded" in Philadelphia, but that is no longer the country's capital city.

Conferences that led up to Canada's Confederation took place in a number of cities, but Ottawa was not one of them.

McMaster University was "founded" in Toronto.
.
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  #28  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2008, 1:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raisethehammer View Post
.
And how is that equivalent to me stating that Tim Hortons was not founded in Hamilton?

At the time of the post, I did not know if it know if it was or was not. Millstone's post provided the conclusive answer.

I give up on you.
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  #29  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2008, 6:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCTed View Post
I stand by my comment. I did not know if the company considered itself to have been founded in Hamilton or not ---- apparently it does.
you better get to hospital because you've a third degree BUUUURNNN
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  #30  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2008, 1:45 AM
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  #31  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2009, 10:57 AM
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Hortons building Ancaster roasting plant
$30 million operation will employ 50

April 29, 2009
Lisa Grace Marr
http://www.thespec.com/News/BreakingNews/article/556902

ANCASTER - Tim Hortons is back in the city where it got its start to brew up another first: a coffee roasting plant built from scratch.

Company officials were on hand for an exclusive tour with The Hamilton Spectator yesterday of the $30-million, 74,000-square-foot plant still under construction.

“We have quite a long history in Hamilton, Store No. 1 is here,” said Don Schroeder, president and CEO, in an interview. “We also had great co-operation from the City of Hamilton in locating here.”

Tim Hortons bought the property in the industrial park on Cormorant Road in January. It owns another coffee roasting plant in Rochester, N.Y., bought in 2001 that was mothballed and needed renovations.

Together, the two coffee roasting plants will give Tim Hortons the capacity to produce 75 per cent of its own coffee. The rest is handled by third-party roasting companies.

The company has started recruiting about 50 full-time staff, and has begun hiring managers.

It’s hopeful news that comes the same day as Statistics Canada’s grim announcement the number of people applying for Employment Insurance benefits in the Hamilton/Burlington area jumped 83 per cent between February 2008 and February 2009.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said city staff worked diligently along with the local utility companies to help the company start construction.

He said Tim Hortons’ new plant is a shot in the arm for the city’s beleaguered manufacturing sector.

“What it means is that manufacturing in the city is … a broad sector,” he said. “Jobs in today’s economy is what everyone is focusing on.”

Schroeder said Hamilton was chosen after a lengthy search for the right site with the right access to transportation routes and the company’s main distribution centre in Guelph.

Schroeder said building the plant is “a dream come true.”

“Now we can truly say we control our coffee from tree to cup.”

There are few brands as closely identified with one particular flavour as Tim Hortons.

The plant is an effort to improve quality control — “to raise the bar higher”for that Tim Hortons coffee taste.

Schroeder said one of the toughest things about getting that taste is that it’s built on an agricultural commodity affected by a variety of factors.

“Bottom line is every cup must taste the same in every store every day. That’s a significant challenge,” he said. “People often say to us, ‘There’s something different in your coffee.’ I say, ‘You’re right. It’s called TLC.’”

The beans come from Central and South America and are premium arabica beans.

Jim Wiant, vice-president of manufacturing and designer of the plant, said the Ancaster facility will also have two laboratories (one is known as the cupping room) for research and development.

Given the importance of those beans, this is the nerve centre of the operation.

It’s run by a team of international flavour sharpshooters who can detect any drop in quality or assortment of the beans coming in the back door.

About 65 per cent of the green beans (unroasted) will eventually come to the Hamilton plant, with the remainder going to the Rochester plant.

Once the beans arrive at the loading docks, they’re stored and then sorted to a recipe as guarded as Kentucky Fried Chicken’s.

The sorted beans are then either shipped out for roasting in “super sacks” or kept in the plant, said Wiant.

After roasting, the beans are cooled by water slightly, demoisturized, put through a grinder and then packed at a mind-boggling speed of 1,100 pouches a minute, with each pouch representing one pot of coffee.

Upstairs features a large lunch room, washrooms, offices and a conference room overlooking the production floor for training Tim Hortons franchisees.

The plant is scheduled to open in the fall.

Wiant said the plant was built with an eye to future expansion: many exterior walls can be easily removed and there are 1.6 hectares available for even more construction.

“When you build a plant like this, you take the long view of the community,” said Wiant.

“Hamilton is a good place to be in. People here have a good work ethic.”

By The Numbers
Facility has two nine-metre-tall roasters

Once operational, it will keep four weeks of green beans in inventory, stored over 25,000 square feet of space on three-metre-tall pallets.

There are eight loading docks, four in, four out.

There are 13-metre-tall silos of green beans holding the secret recipe for Tim Hortons coffee.

It’s built on four hectares of land.

Construction costs: $30 million.

Will employ 50 people.

Plant is 74,000 square feet.

It will churn out 1,100 pouches a minute on the high speed packer (one pouch makes a pot of coffee).
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  #32  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2009, 3:39 AM
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Tim Hortons plans Hamilton coffee plant

Please delete this thread if it's already mentioned elsewhere (I didn't see it anywhere, but maybe I'm blind). I first heard about it on the news feed in the elevator at work in TO:

Quote:
Tims plans Hamilton coffee plant

$30-million roasting facility will create 130 jobs in Steeltown

April 29, 2009
THE CANADIAN PRESS

Coffee and doughnut chain Tim Hortons Inc. says it plans to build a $30-million coffee bean production and roasting plant in Hamilton, a move that will create about 130 jobs.

The Oakville company said Wednesday the new plant, which will also contain a research centre, will improve efficiencies and quality control at the retailer.

The plant will create 80 construction jobs and 50 operating jobs when it opens at the end of the year, Hortons said.

"Coffee is the foundation of our success," said Don Schroeder, president and CEO of the company. "This $30-million investment in coffee research and production is one of the largest of its kind in Canada and reinforces our commitment to delivering the best cup of coffee every time to every customer."

Tim Hortons operates a second coffee plant in Rochester, N.Y.. When fully operating, the two plants will produce about 75 per cent of the company's coffee requirements.

Construction is underway and the plant is expected to be operating in the fourth quarter.

At the end of last year, Tim Hortons had 3,437 restaurants, including 2,917 in Canada and 520 in the United States.
http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/626233
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  #33  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2009, 3:51 AM
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Any idea where this plant will be? Like, actually IN Hamilton proper or on the fringe of the city out by the airport or something?
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  #34  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2009, 7:48 AM
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I love how Tim Horton's has become an Oakville company despite having started in Hamilton.
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  #35  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2009, 11:07 AM
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I'm pretty sure this will be in the Ancaster business park.
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  #36  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2009, 1:24 PM
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Yes, Ancaster.
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  #37  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2009, 4:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crhayes View Post
I love how Tim Horton's has become an Oakville company despite having started in Hamilton.
I'm pretty sure most of it is owned by US shareholders anyway!
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  #38  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 5:06 AM
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Not to beat a dead-horse but TDL hasn't "become" an Oakville company--as a corporate entity, it always has been.
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  #39  
Old Posted May 27, 2009, 8:28 PM
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^ whatever
it should have its head office in Hamilton

Do you think Walmart will take its head office out of Bentonville for something more sexy?

Tim Hortons is working class coffee, it's the Walmart of the donut. what better city to have its HO located then the City where it all began and the coffee of the working family.

Traders....
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  #40  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2009, 5:45 PM
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Remember this post I made a while back about Tim Horton's new roasting facility in Ancaster?

Quote:
Originally Posted by markbarbera View Post
Mixed feelings here. While it is always nice to see a major tenant arrive, many people tend to overlook the environmental impact of a industrial coffee roasting facility. If the oven's chimney is not equipped with appropriate brush filtering, the roasting can release significant amounts of fine particulate matter.
This was in today's Spec:

Quote:
Coffee roaster in Ancaster appealing emissions standards

August 06, 2009
Eric McGuinness
The Hamilton Spectator

Tim Hortons is appealing odour-control rules imposed on its $30-million coffee roasting plant by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment.

The complaint cites onerous, unnecessary and "patently unreasonable" conditions in the ministry's certificate of approval for air emissions.

It also says a requirement to report every environmental complaint within two days "creates a significant, unnecessary and duplicative administrative burden and is a more onerous reporting standard than what is required by the regulatory reporting requirements."

The certificate is in the name of Fruition Manufacturing Ltd., operating as Maidstone Coffee Canada, a wholly owned subsidiary of TDL Group Corp. of Oakville, which runs Tim Hortons.

Tim Hortons spokesperson David Morelli said yesterday it would be inappropriate to comment with the appeal pending.

The emissions issue is significant because coffee roasting releases a variety of volatile organic compounds, particulate matter and smoke. A quick Google search turns up many instances of odour complaints and enforcement measures involving coffee roasters in other places.

The ministry says airborne contaminants from the Tim Hortons plant will include particles, nitrogen oxides and acrolein, which is also found in tobacco smoke and vehicle exhaust. The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry says acrolein is a toxic substance that causes inflammation and irritation of the skin, respiratory tract and mucous membranes. Its odour is described as pungent and suffocating.

The plant being built on Cormorant Drive in the Ancaster Industrial Park, slated to open later this year, will produce 1,000 one-pot pouches of ground coffee a minute.

The approval certificate says it will have three gas-fired roasting drums, each with a capacity of 3,000 kilograms of green, or unroasted, coffee beans an hour and each equipped with a catalytic incinerator to remove contaminants.

The full text of the appeal and the approval certificate can be found online by searching for No. 010-5867 on the Environmental Bill of Rights Registry, www.ebr.gov.on.ca. Appeals under the Environmental Protection Act are heard by the Environmental Review Tribunal. Updates on the case, No. 09-064, will be available at www.ert.gov.on.ca.
Looks like the Environment Ministry is going to keep a close look on this facility, and Timmies doesn't seem too happy about it...
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