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  #16101  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 6:22 PM
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Therein lies part of the problem. If Alberta made trucks instead of selling trucks to Albertans made somewhere else those jobs would be far more secure. What's important to Alberta's long term prosperity isn't signs of a turn around in energy but signs of diversification of the economy.
Everyone says diversify diversify but it’s not that easy. Alberta has no coastline, crap weather, and honestly not a lot going for it except oil. The Maritimes have a coast line and a ton of government support yet still haven’t successful diversified from their fishing industry 40 years ago.

You have BC with better weather and a coastline right next door competing for every business Alberta could potentially diversify into as BC does its best to get off its GDP version of oil aka real estate. You think BC is going to give Alberta any chance to diversify?
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  #16102  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 9:15 PM
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Originally Posted by misher View Post
Everyone says diversify diversify but it’s not that easy. Alberta has no coastline, crap weather, and honestly not a lot going for it except oil. The Maritimes have a coast line and a ton of government support yet still haven’t successful diversified from their fishing industry 40 years ago.
Wha? Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting combined comprise only 3.5% of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick's GDP directly, and 7% of PEI's. Whereas mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction comprise 17% of Alberta's direct GDP, even now. At the peak of the energy boom in the late 2000s, oil and gas was more than 30% of Alberta's.

The Maritimes are way more diversified than Alberta, which is part of the reason economic shocks are often muted here. We don't ride big highs but we don't suffer precipitous lows, either. (Newfoundland, on the hand...)

I don't know if any province in modern times has been so totally dependent on one industry as Alberta was at the peak of oil and gas, or even now.
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  #16103  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 10:03 PM
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From my vantage point in parallel universe Canada, Canadian industry seems feeble. Bombardier is probably our best firm, and its corruption issues mean that it is no source of pride outside a narrow circle.

Little Sweden has IKEA, Volvo, Scania, H&M, Electrolux, and Ericsson, not to mention things like Spotify. Point is, you've probably heard of them. Not so much the other way, though. Why?
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  #16104  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Drybrain View Post
Wha? Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting combined comprise only 3.5% of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick's GDP directly, and 7% of PEI's. Whereas mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction comprise 17% of Alberta's direct GDP, even now. At the peak of the energy boom in the late 2000s, oil and gas was more than 30% of Alberta's.

The Maritimes are way more diversified than Alberta, which is part of the reason economic shocks are often muted here. We don't ride big highs but we don't suffer precipitous lows, either. (Newfoundland, on the hand...)

I don't know if any province in modern times has been so totally dependent on one industry as Alberta was at the peak of oil and gas, or even now.
doing a super quick analysis, BCs economy is more dependant on real estate than Alberta’s is of energy. Share of GDP For BC real estate is 17.38% while ABs energy share of its GDP is 16.81%
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  #16105  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
From my vantage point in parallel universe Canada, Canadian industry seems feeble. Bombardier is probably our best firm, and its corruption issues mean that it is no source of pride outside a narrow circle.

Little Sweden has IKEA, Volvo, Scania, H&M, Electrolux, and Ericsson, not to mention things like Spotify. Point is, you've probably heard of them. Not so much the other way, though. Why?
Shopify, The Bay, Canada Goose, Sorel, Molson, Lululemon.

Stantec Engineering, PCL, (dare I say SNC Lavalin?).Blackberry (Relevant not all that long ago).

Aside from maybe the Bay, the other firms sell internationally or do business internationally.
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  #16106  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 11:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Therein lies part of the problem. If Alberta made trucks instead of selling trucks to Albertans made somewhere else those jobs would be far more secure. What's important to Alberta's long term prosperity isn't signs of a turn around in energy but signs of diversification of the economy.
Well why didn't you say so earlier? Is that all it takes? Diversify the AB economy and start building "trucks" here? Just like that eh? Think the ONT gov't or the unions would allow a "truck" plant to be built in Red Deer? They can't even keep them being built in ONT!
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  #16107  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 11:31 PM
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[QUOTE=kool maudit;8744712]From my vantage point in parallel universe Canada, Canadian industry seems feeble. Bombardier is probably our best firm, and its corruption issues mean that it is no source of pride outside a narrow circle.

Little Sweden has IKEA, Volvo, Scania, H&M, Electrolux, and Ericsson, not to mention things like Spotify. Point is, you've probably heard of them. Not so much the other way, though. Why?[/QUOTE]

Asked and answered many times in the past. Canada's private sector leaders are pretty third rate (with notable exceptions) as the best and brightest head to the public sector or leave the country. Has been that way for a very long time.

Last edited by kwoldtimer; Nov 10, 2019 at 11:57 PM.
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  #16108  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2019, 11:56 PM
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doing a super quick analysis, BCs economy is more dependant on real estate than Alberta’s is of energy. Share of GDP For BC real estate is 17.38% while ABs energy share of its GDP is 16.81%
Residential construction is 4% of BC GDP while real estate agents/property management is 1%. They way get that number up to 17% is including revenue from property rentals.

As for BC stopping AB from diversifying that is silly. BC is not actively stopping AB from diversifying its economy. If someone starts up a software company in Calgary, overnight there is not another company trying to do the same thing in Vancouver.

Looking for major Canadian brands in the world I would include: Lululemon Athletica, Hootsuite, MacDonald Detwiller among a long list of others.
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  #16109  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 1:54 AM
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Residential construction is 4% of BC GDP while real estate agents/property management is 1%. They way get that number up to 17% is including revenue from property rentals.

As for BC stopping AB from diversifying that is silly. BC is not actively stopping AB from diversifying its economy. If someone starts up a software company in Calgary, overnight there is not another company trying to do the same thing in Vancouver.

Looking for major Canadian brands in the world I would include: Lululemon Athletica, Hootsuite, MacDonald Detwiller among a long list of others.
You forgot commercial construction, leasing, renovations, contractors, landscaping, painters, concrete, forestry, banking, etc. all added up I suspect real estate is around a quarter of BC’s economy.

And of course BC is doing its best to kill it because a cheaper house is better than a good economy!
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  #16110  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 1:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Razor View Post
Shopify, The Bay, Canada Goose, Sorel, Molson, Lululemon.

Stantec Engineering, PCL, (dare I say SNC Lavalin?).Blackberry (Relevant not all that long ago).

Aside from maybe the Bay, the other firms sell internationally or do business internationally.
Aside from Lululemon possibly, none of those are even close to being as recognizable to, say, a Swede, like almost all of the Swedish ones are known to Canadians.
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  #16111  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 2:58 AM
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Internationally I feel known Canadian products will be more localized.

Here in Japan it is Lululemon, Canada Goose, Canada Club Whisky, and Bombardier (but Bombardier has a negative image due to some problems a Japanese airline had with their aircraft, not sure how long ago that was or if I heard them right).

Interesting Australia seems to be similar to Canada in this regard. Can’t even think of many famous Australian brands / products that are widely known / available.
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  #16112  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 3:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
Internationally I feel known Canadian products will be more localized.

Here in Japan it is Lululemon, Canada Goose, Canada Club Whisky, and Bombardier (but Bombardier has a negative image due to some problems a Japanese airline had with their aircraft, not sure how long ago that was or if I heard them right).

Interesting Australia seems to be similar to Canada in this regard. Can’t even think of many famous Australian brands / products that are widely known / available.
Vegemite?
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  #16113  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 3:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
Internationally I feel known Canadian products will be more localized.

Here in Japan it is Lululemon, Canada Goose, Canada Club Whisky, and Bombardier (but Bombardier has a negative image due to some problems a Japanese airline had with their aircraft, not sure how long ago that was or if I heard them right).

Interesting Australia seems to be similar to Canada in this regard. Can’t even think of many famous Australian brands / products that are widely known / available.
Billabong? Arnott's? Foster's? Blundstone?
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  #16114  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:11 AM
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Vegemite?
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Billabong? Arnott's? Foster's? Blundstone?
Seems to me that Foster's is the only well-known Australian brand, but even then it's only really in the UK/Ireland where there's a high degree of recognition of it and that it's Australian.
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  #16115  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:14 AM
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Seems to me that Foster's is the only well-known Australian brand, but even then it's only really in the UK/Ireland where there's a high degree of recognition of it and that it's Australian.
I assume the Foster's one can buy here is brewed in NAmerica?
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  #16116  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:20 AM
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For some reason, I've got a sudden urge to say to all "G'Day, Bruce!"...
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  #16117  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:21 AM
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Aside from Lululemon possibly, none of those are even close to being as recognizable to, say, a Swede, like almost all of the Swedish ones are known to Canadians.
Certainly Blackberry when it was a thing..Canada Goose as well. Somebody else mentioned Canadian Cub Whiskey which was a good choice!
But yes, maybe the construction or engineering companies not so much.

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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
Interesting Australia seems to be similar to Canada in this regard. Can’t even think of many famous Australian brands / products that are widely known / available.
Maybe it's a function of trading partners?..I'm sure there are some Australian brands that are household names in parts of Asia ,and definitely New Zealand. Globally, you are correct.I can only think of maybe Fosters myself.
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  #16118  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:23 AM
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I assume the Foster's one can buy here is brewed in NAmerica?
No idea, but I'd imagine the only people who'd be aware of "the Australian beer Foster's Lager" would be veteran drinkers in a pub.

When it comes to foreign beers, my guess would be that the most well-known one would be Corona, and that people know it's Mexican.
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  #16119  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:32 AM
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Well why didn't you say so earlier? Is that all it takes? Diversify the AB economy and start building "trucks" here? Just like that eh? Think the ONT gov't or the unions would allow a "truck" plant to be built in Red Deer? They can't even keep them being built in ONT!
I was told solar in Alberta was a bad idea because Alberta doesn't manufacturer solar panels.
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  #16120  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 5:00 AM
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I saw an article a while ago about how Blackberry has really changed itself, no longer known for phones.

here is an example

Hyundai Autron selects Blackberry QNX to power autonomous vehicle software
Buckley Smith @buckleysmith7
Published: November 7th, 2019

BlackBerry has announced that Hyundai Autron, a subsidiary of Hyundai Motor Group, has selected BlackBerry QNX to power the company’s next generation of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving software platform.

“Hyundai Autron develops the Hyundai Motor standard software platform based on the international AUTOSAR standard,” said Dae-Heung Moon, CEO at Hyundai Autron. “Powered by BlackBerry QNX technology, together we will deliver ADAS and autonomous driving software platforms that will set a new standard for the automotive industry.”

The solution that Hyundai Autron will be using is called QNX OS for Safety, which is a software that specializes in safety and mission-critical applications, such as ADAS and autonomous driving.

...

https://www.itworldcanada.com/articl...oftware/423773
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