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  #16121  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 7:09 AM
whatnext whatnext is offline
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Originally Posted by MacLac View Post
Well why didn't you say so earlier? Is that all it takes? Diversify the AB economy and start building "trucks" here? Just like that eh? Think the ONT gov't or the unions would allow a "truck" plant to be built in Red Deer? They can't even keep them being built in ONT!
Alberta should export its world class whining and victim mentality.
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  #16122  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 7:42 AM
casper casper is offline
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Originally Posted by MacLac View Post
Well why didn't you say so earlier? Is that all it takes? Diversify the AB economy and start building "trucks" here? Just like that eh? Think the ONT gov't or the unions would allow a "truck" plant to be built in Red Deer? They can't even keep them being built in ONT!
To be clear no one is going to ask the Ontario government or the unions in Ontario if Red Deer can have a truck plant or not.

Saskatoon has a major Fiat (New Holland) plant. There is also a plant that makes ambulances. Winnipeg has New Flyer (bus manufacturing).

The Toyota rim plant in Richmond (Vancouver) closed down a number of years ago.
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  #16123  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 7:45 AM
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Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
No idea, but I'd imagine the only people who'd be aware of "the Australian beer Foster's Lager" would be veteran drinkers in a pub.

When it comes to foreign beers, my guess would be that the most well-known one would be Corona, and that people know it's Mexican.
Foster's is quite well known for being Australian globally I am pretty sure. Moreso than Molson for being Canadian.
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  #16124  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 7:55 AM
casper casper is offline
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Originally Posted by misher View Post
You forgot commercial construction, leasing, renovations, contractors, landscaping, painters, concrete, forestry, banking, etc. all added up I suspect real estate is around a quarter of BC’s economy.

And of course BC is doing its best to kill it because a cheaper house is better than a good economy!
The suggestion is there is something wrong with the BC because it is "dependent" of real estate. I would agree building that are not occupied by people is a problem. Real estate flipping or other financial exercises done by realtors is a problem. Realtors and residential construction is a very small part of the economy.

The guy that cuts the lawn in front of a condo tower is not a problem.

Industrial construction is going to include massive LNG projects or site C and a host of other thing that have nothing to do residential construction.
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  #16125  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 2:21 PM
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Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
Alberta should export its world class whining and victim mentality.
Whose whining besides you? Wanna know what's funny? I worked on a huge project outside of FSJ for a few years....2/3 of the workers came from AB and 1/3 from BC because the Prime contractor "could not find enough workers in BC" who wanted to work.....this is even with free flights from all over the province. This project was in BC....but not enough pot smoking BC'ers wanted to get off their couch, put down the pipe and work....
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  #16126  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 2:24 PM
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Originally Posted by casper View Post
To be clear no one is going to ask the Ontario government or the unions in Ontario if Red Deer can have a truck plant or not.

Saskatoon has a major Fiat (New Holland) plant. There is also a plant that makes ambulances. Winnipeg has New Flyer (bus manufacturing).

The Toyota rim plant in Richmond (Vancouver) closed down a number of years ago.
Good one....a farm tractor and a bus plant as examples as "truck" plants as a way to diversify one's economy. I'm sure that adds a ton to the province's GDP. Just stop it already.....
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  #16127  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 3:18 PM
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Originally Posted by misher View Post
You forgot commercial construction, leasing, renovations, contractors, landscaping, painters, concrete, forestry, banking, etc. all added up I suspect real estate is around a quarter of BC’s economy.

And of course BC is doing its best to kill it because a cheaper house is better than a good economy!
Cheaper housing, without the preceding layoffs that usually cause cheaper housing, would significantly increase the demand on most of what you list above.

Sales volume drives most of the real-estate market, not high prices. A 20 million dollar house owned by a couple for 50 years doesn't provide much revenue to the real-estate market; but 100 $200k condos ($20M value) that change owners/residents every 2 years would keep dozens employed.
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  #16128  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:03 PM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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Originally Posted by MacLac View Post
Whose whining besides you? Wanna know what's funny? I worked on a huge project outside of FSJ for a few years....2/3 of the workers came from AB and 1/3 from BC because the Prime contractor "could not find enough workers in BC" who wanted to work.....this is even with free flights from all over the province. This project was in BC....but not enough pot smoking BC'ers wanted to get off their couch, put down the pipe and work....
Not really "funny", just a reality in a country where freedom of movement is a real thing. Perhaps it wasn't "putting down a pipe", but maybe BC'ers are enjoying their high paying white collar jobs and nobody's desperate enough to swing a hammer in FSJ for a few dollars an hour?
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  #16129  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 4:28 PM
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Originally Posted by WarrenC12 View Post
Not really "funny", just a reality in a country where freedom of movement is a real thing. Perhaps it wasn't "putting down a pipe", but maybe BC'ers are enjoying their high paying white collar jobs and nobody's desperate enough to swing a hammer in FSJ for a few dollars an hour?
There’s a ton of young people in Vancouver who complain everyday about not making enough and the cost of living but refuse to do jobs that require hard work such as this one. Albertan culture encourages hard work while we’re focused on partying, political causes, and weed.
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  #16130  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2019, 10:32 PM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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Originally Posted by misher View Post
There’s a ton of young people in Vancouver who complain everyday about not making enough and the cost of living but refuse to do jobs that require hard work such as this one. Albertan culture encourages hard work while we’re focused on partying, political causes, and weed.
Are you sure you aren't a boomer in disguise? That's a tired old trope that needs to die.
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  #16131  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 5:06 AM
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My brother-in-law has been working in BC for 15 years but never lived here as he returns every month to his wife {my sister} about once a month. The companies pays for his accomodation while in BC. He makes very good money in construction which has allowed them to build a big house on 10 acres 30 minutes from London for the same price as a 40 year old 450 sq foot bachelor in Vancouver. Of course, his income tax is filed in Ontario as you pay it where you live and not where you make it which costs BC a lot in income taxes.
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  #16132  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 5:15 AM
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Originally Posted by misher View Post
There’s a ton of young people in Vancouver who complain everyday about not making enough and the cost of living but refuse to do jobs that require hard work such as this one. Albertan culture encourages hard work while we’re focused on partying, political causes, and weed.
no Alberta pays kids straight out of high school ridiculous amounts of money with a grade 12 education. I see here it all the time, straight out of grade 12 making enough money in a year to buy a $50,000 truck after the second year they buy a muscle car, 3rd year maybe a boat, they go to Mexico or Las Vegas as often as they can or want to.

Nowhere can compete with the wages paid in Alberta.
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  #16133  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 7:28 AM
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
no Alberta pays kids straight out of high school ridiculous amounts of money with a grade 12 education. I see here it all the time, straight out of grade 12 making enough money in a year to buy a $50,000 truck after the second year they buy a muscle car, 3rd year maybe a boat, they go to Mexico or Las Vegas as often as they can or want to.

Nowhere can compete with the wages paid in Alberta.
How does any of that imply that they don't work hard?
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  #16134  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 12:20 PM
milomilo milomilo is online now
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Originally Posted by WarrenC12 View Post
Not really "funny", just a reality in a country where freedom of movement is a real thing. Perhaps it wasn't "putting down a pipe", but maybe BC'ers are enjoying their high paying white collar jobs and nobody's desperate enough to swing a hammer in FSJ for a few dollars an hour?
As far as I've seen, the white collar jobs in Vancouver pay pitiful wages, especially compared to the outrageous housing costs, whereas that hammer swinger (or electrician, or welder etc) might be earning a very good wage. Sure Vancouver is a hell of a lot nicer than FSJ, but money talks.
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  #16135  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 5:04 PM
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Originally Posted by MacLac View Post
Whose whining besides you? Wanna know what's funny? I worked on a huge project outside of FSJ for a few years....2/3 of the workers came from AB and 1/3 from BC because the Prime contractor "could not find enough workers in BC" who wanted to work.....this is even with free flights from all over the province. This project was in BC....but not enough pot smoking BC'ers wanted to get off their couch, put down the pipe and work....
Kitimat is the same way. Trades guys go where the work is. There are direct flights from Edmonton and Calgary. The contractors that are doing these projects have there base in Alberta . they were the ones that have the expertise to build these massive plants and camps.

I was part of a migratory group in the 80s going to Ontario to work on Darlington, when there was a downturn here. I also see 100s of other that came here during our boom.

White collars do not tend to migrate as much. That said I am heading to Kitimat later this week so yah some white collars travel. I just wont move anymore.
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  #16136  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 5:56 PM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
As far as I've seen, the white collar jobs in Vancouver pay pitiful wages, especially compared to the outrageous housing costs, whereas that hammer swinger (or electrician, or welder etc) might be earning a very good wage. Sure Vancouver is a hell of a lot nicer than FSJ, but money talks.
Not loud enough, apparently.

I don't begrudge people who work in Vancouver or FSJ. I was simply responding to an immature post.
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  #16137  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 6:04 PM
Denscity Denscity is offline
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Last chart I saw showed Vancouver had very similar wages and housing costs to Toronto.
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  #16138  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 7:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Denscity View Post
Last chart I saw showed Vancouver had very similar wages and housing costs to Toronto.
Slightly lower wages and housing costs. Vancouver is mostly detached houses though which pushes their housing cost average way up. If you look at Metro Vancouver as a whole housing gets much more affordable.
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  #16139  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 7:09 PM
Denscity Denscity is offline
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Slightly lower wages and housing costs. Vancouver is mostly detached houses though which pushes their housing cost average way up. If you look at Metro Vancouver as a whole housing gets much more affordable.
True downtown is where almost all the apartments and condos are.
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  #16140  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 7:24 PM
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https://www.vancourier.com/real-esta...ame-1.23836506

An old article so I apologize if its a repost but I felt that its a great way to describe the typical Vancouverite attitude where there must be someone to blame besides ourselves. I feel like politics has become the game where we get people to blame blame blame instead of finding real solutions. If your keeping track of Vancouver real estate, prices were up even higher a year after the foreign buyer tax came in and foreign purchases dropped to 1%. And the new taxes have killed the luxury market but affordable below a million dollar housing is more expensive than before not less. So we now receive a lot less taxes from real estate sales but our market is less affordable. And our rental vacancy rate hasn't improved despite all the "taxes" on empty homes because in the end we don't have a large supply of foreigner owned empty homes like everyone was screaming. Vancouver is filled with people with a "mob mentality" where they need a single target to blame and once that target is hit and things don't improve they are guided to the next target. This to me kind of mirrors the environmental movement, right now the target is Albertan oil but once thats gone likely it'll shift, perhaps to BC LNG or Quebec Concrete? People are not good at accepting that there are multiple factors, they want one easy target.

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Opinion: Money launderers the latest bogeyman to blame
Hard for B.C. government and public to admit that we drove real estate values up all by ourselves

First we were told it was foreign buyers who had driven up the cost of housing in British Columbia.

Then it was real estate speculators who were responsible.

Now the B.C. government and much of the public and media have turned the guns on near-phantom money launderers as the mystery bogeyman to blame for the unprecedented surge in Metro Vancouver housing prices from 2015 to 2017.

Despite all the hyperbole and headlines, it turned out that foreign home buying in Metro Vancouver peaked at less than 5 per cent of sales and has since fallen below 1 per cent.

The few remaining foreign homebuyers are still exposed to a 20 per cent tax on their purchase.

The provincial government then further weaponized taxes and thundered after residential speculators who it said were forcing tenants into the streets and driving up residential prices across the province.

“The speculation tax focuses on people who are treating our housing market like a stock market,” said Finance MinisterCarole James.

The government then required the majority of B.C. homeowners to fill out a lengthy form on any homes they owned. Failure to do so results in taxes of thousands of dollars, guilty or not.

The forms revealed that just 1 per cent of owners could be defined as speculators and most of these are B.C. families who happen to own a vacation home, often for generations.

The money launderers are an even more elusive target, primarily because it is not against the law in B.C., at least not yet, to pay cash for something.

The recent government-ordered report on money laundering in B.C. real estate was vague to the point of nonsense. It could be worth $800 million. It could be $5 billion. Whatever, who knows? The report also stated that Manitoba and Saskatchewan have more money laundering in real estate than B.C., which gives an idea of how much faith we should put in its findings.

Now the provincial government has ordered an expensive Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in B.C., which won’t report back until May 2021.

What politicians miss is that there is no mystery bogeyman to blame for high home prices. B.C. residents buy and sell more than 96 per cent of residential real estate; all the biggest property developers are B.C. born and built; and government delays and taxes have helped drive housing supply down and prices up.

But it is easier, and more vote-friendly, to blame someone, anyone else.
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