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  #21  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2019, 1:56 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
At some point it will slow. But I believe that the Indian immigration wave will continue for a very long time.

If you go to any suburb in the New York or Philadelphia metro regions, you'll notice that Indians and South Asians are quickly dominating entire towns and regions, displacing formerly white neighborhoods. I've heard lots of contention due to this, as Indians and South Asians are culturally very different than most American born people. It's kind of a culture clash that I don't see resolving any time soon.

This started mainly with Obama, as entire extended families came to the US together. I know more cases than I can count of multiple generations and sides of families, upwards of 10 people living in 3 bedroom apartments and homes.
Yeah, that doesn't sound absurd. Indian families came to the U.S. "under Obama" and there are "big cultural clashes" in McMansionland. The Princeton, NJ area is under near-riot conditions from the influx of highly educated, high earning, family oriented Indian techies, doctors and engineers.

In reality, Indian families have pretty much seamlessly integrated into upper middle class sprawl America, even in very conservative red areas (which would not describe Central Jersey).
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  #22  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2019, 2:12 PM
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Unhhh guys, Indians have been coming here in droves since the 1960's....
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  #23  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2019, 5:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Yeah, that doesn't sound absurd. Indian families came to the U.S. "under Obama" and there are "big cultural clashes" in McMansionland. The Princeton, NJ area is under near-riot conditions from the influx of highly educated, high earning, family oriented Indian techies, doctors and engineers.

In reality, Indian families have pretty much seamlessly integrated into upper middle class sprawl America, even in very conservative red areas (which would not describe Central Jersey).
It was Bush Sr. who signed the bill that opened up chain migration. The H1b program was started in the 90s. Prior to the Tech Boom the Indian community in California was fairly small. Might be different in New Jersey, Philly, and Chicago.
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  #24  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2019, 6:34 PM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Yeah, that doesn't sound absurd. Indian families came to the U.S. "under Obama" and there are "big cultural clashes" in McMansionland. The Princeton, NJ area is under near-riot conditions from the influx of highly educated, high earning, family oriented Indian techies, doctors and engineers.

In reality, Indian families have pretty much seamlessly integrated into upper middle class sprawl America, even in very conservative red areas (which would not describe Central Jersey).

You quoted me saying ''under Obama'', which I did not. I said it started mainly with Obama. This is when a visibly larger number of Indian extended families began moving into suburban communities throughout the mid-Atlantic.

Also, ''pretty much seamlessly integrated'' is quite a stretch. I don't know of any native born american families that have three generations on both sides living under one roof.

Either way, my observations are just that, observations. There's nothing wrong with cultural differences, but some people don't like them and/or are uncomfortable with them.
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  #25  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2019, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post

Either way, my observations are just that, observations. There's nothing wrong with cultural differences, but some people don't like them and/or are uncomfortable with them.
I'm highly skeptical of this premise. I don't think large numbers of Americans dislike/are uncomfortable with the Indian professional families in sprawl, especially relative to other ethnic minorities. They tend to be highly educated, high earning, speak excellent English, kids are smart and well behaved, and they assimilate very quickly.

The extended family thing isn't that rare around immigrants. In the NYC metro, particularly, homes are often built with accessory apartments, long predating Indian migration.

Central Jersey around Route 1 has gone from like no Indians to maybe a third Indian in a generation, and it's pretty much the same as always. It's about as much as an issue as Catholics taking over from WASPs in Coastal CT, or Jewish suburbs slowly transitioning to more religious.
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  #26  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2019, 11:01 PM
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Outside NYC, there doesn't seem to be much of a South Asian working class in the US at all. Canada's South Asian population is more Muslim and Sikh and more working class. In some ways it shares the same timing as US immigration but a socioeconomic profile more like the British South Asian population.
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  #27  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 6:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
I thought I read some projections that the black population which has been pretty stable at about 12-14% of the overall U.S. population was projected to start rising to about 17-18+% but I can't seem to find that information. Have you heard/read the same?



Yikes, they better consider Canada or Siberia then.
African-American population is shrinking considerable but immigration from Africa has kept the overall number reletively steady at 10%. They should really split these populations within the census to give more clarity as to how the Black population bin America is shifting and changing.

Asian immigration will slow from China once they reach their next level of development. Likely will see a pickup from India to take the top spott of the source point for Asian immigration.
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  #28  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 7:29 PM
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Stats from 2013-2017 per the department of homeland security website. This is a comparison of the NY MSA vs. the SF/SJ CSA combined.

2017

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 7,822
India - 9,551
Nepal - 1,197
Pakistan - 4,153
Sri Lanka - 349
Total - 23,072

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 183
India - 5,253
Nepal - 582
Pakistan - 593
Sri Lanka - 82
Total - 6,693

2016

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 10,159
India - 10,768
Nepal - 1,458
Pakistan - 4,910
Sri Lanka - 401
Total - 27,696

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 194
India - 5,536
Nepal - 660
Pakistan - 691
Sri Lanka - 97
Total - 7,178

2015

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 7,540
India - 9,980
Nepal - 1,311
Pakistan - 4,462
Sri Lanka - 352
Total - 23,645

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 155
India - 6,099
Nepal - 565
Pakistan - 634
Sri Lanka - 106
Total - 7,559

2014

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 8,038
India - 12,350
Nepal - 1,285
Pakistan - 4,800
Sri Lanka - 388
Total - 26,861

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 154
India - 7,810
Nepal - 556
Pakistan - 550
Sri Lanka - 96
Total - 9,166

2013

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 6,010
India - 10,818
Nepal - 1,358
Pakistan - 3,121
Sri Lanka - 417
Total- 21,724

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 121
India - 6,831
Nepal - 625
Pakistan - 504
Sri Lanka - 86
Total - 8,167

Combined 5 Year total



NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 39,569
India - 53,467
Nepal - 6,609
Pakistan - 21,446
Sri Lanka - 1,907
Total - 122,998

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 807
India - 31,529
Nepal - 2,988
Pakistan - 2,972
Sri Lanka - 467
Total - 38,763
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  #29  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 8:04 PM
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Originally Posted by osmo View Post
African-American population is shrinking considerable but immigration from Africa has kept the overall number reletively steady at 10%. They should really split these populations within the census to give more clarity as to how the Black population bin America is shifting and changing.
There's probably not an easy way to do that though, right? Census stats, other that asking you where you're born, can't really record how long ago someone's ancestors arrived, right, (aside from first-generation immigrants) whether they're 2nd generation or 7th generation. Plus, many African immigrants do marry and have kids with people in older African American communities.

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Originally Posted by osmo View Post

Asian immigration will slow from China once they reach their next level of development. Likely will see a pickup from India to take the top spott of the source point for Asian immigration.
I think the region of East Asia already has peaked in immigration from the 2000s to the 2010s, and South Asia is taking up more of the share of Asia.

If you look at the change from the turn of the millenium to 2014, it seems like, though not as much as Mexico (which went from 21 to 15%), the East Asian sources of naturalized citizens -- Korea, Vietnam (6% to 3%) and China (6% to 5%) have gone down in share, but India has gone up (5 to 6%).

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  #30  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 8:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
Outside NYC, there doesn't seem to be much of a South Asian working class in the US at all. Canada's South Asian population is more Muslim and Sikh and more working class. In some ways it shares the same timing as US immigration but a socioeconomic profile more like the British South Asian population.
Didn't Canada's South Asian share of the Asian population become larger relative to the East Asian share earlier than the US did though (due to British commonwealth ties and probably that the US had more ties with East Asia like Vietnamese refugees, war brides, Korean adoptees etc.)?

Both Canada and the US certainly had nearly all the major growth in South Asian immigration post 1970s and 80s, but the US had much more of the tech worker wave of post 90s and 2000s right? Canada, while low in number, still had refugee/working class South Asian waves of migration from the 80s and 90s (eg. Punjabi Sikhs fleeing communal violence in the Punjab, Sri Lankan Tamils fleeing war) that the US mostly lacked.
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  #31  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 8:20 PM
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Not sure where to find the data, but what are the trends in native-born vs. foreign-born Asian Americans through time?

Isn't the Asian American population still like high 50s % to 60s % -ish foreign born (first generation) now. If Asian immigration slowed down significantly, would we see the Asian American share become majority native born within a generation (or maybe the East Asian share -- right now only Japanese Americans are really statistically majority native born ones whose families are multi-generational stateside)? But then again, the Asian American native birth rate is not that high either.

The Hispanic/Latino American population is only in the 30-something % foreign born (down from near 40% in the turn of the millenium) and has more or less been mostly native-born now for a while, as the immigration leveled off. But the Hispanic native birth rate was pretty high for the previous generation. Now, more or less all the races in the US don't have that high of a birth rate, but closer to 2.0 children or less (black, white and Asians all below 2, Hispanics close to 2).
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  #32  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 8:50 PM
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South Asian birth rates in Canada are high while Chinese are low. Chinese Canadians have an age structure more similar to the white population than the overall visible minority population.

I'm guessing the Indian American professional families don't have high birthrates though.
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  #33  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2019, 9:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
South Asian birth rates in Canada are high while Chinese are low. Chinese Canadians have an age structure more similar to the white population than the overall visible minority population.

I'm guessing the Indian American professional families don't have high birthrates though.
Is that a factor in why Canada has a proportionally higher South Asian to East Asian ratio than the US, despite immigration timing being similar, or is it from Canada taking more immigrants from South Asia to begin with (who more likely speak English and have commonwealth ties than East Asians)?
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  #34  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2019, 9:59 PM
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Indian population diversifying Bay Area’s Asian population


https://www.mercurynews.com/2011/05/...an-population/
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  #35  
Old Posted May 21, 2019, 2:39 AM
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As far as which immigrant groups will dominate, I think the NE and South will be Indian, Chinese and Diverse Latino. The Midwest will be Indian and Mexico/Central American and the West will be Filipino and Mexican/Central American. Of course there will be others, but the groups I listed will dominate.

After Central America, DR and Cuba are tapped, (within 20 years) Latin American immigration will be done. Brazil, Argentina and Chile will suck up immigrants from the rest of South America.

China will reach peak population in 2023. They will need immigrants by 2040 and I mean a lot, though they’ll have trouble finding them. The Mideast, now Japan and North America also tap SE Asia, so you will have competition there, although fertility rate declines will cause these countries to cease being people exporters by 2050.

South Asia will have excess population until about 2100. They will have high emigration until AI and automation advances cut it off, around 2040. This will be good for them because they will still have enough people to keep their economies humming along with a large diaspora sending remittances back home. China won’t have this advantage.

Africa will have a moderate sized diaspora by 2040, but would have missed the large emigration period the rest of the world had experienced. And let’s face it, there will be considerable resistance to large scale African immigration anywhere in the world (racism on steroids). This unfortunately, might isolate Africa more so, although it’s convenient geographical location should mitigate the effect.
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  #36  
Old Posted May 21, 2019, 11:05 PM
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  #37  
Old Posted May 21, 2019, 11:18 PM
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I would guess Asian immigration would peak somewhere around 2030-2050, assuming no changes in immigration policy.
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  #38  
Old Posted May 22, 2019, 12:39 AM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Why do you ask about immigration into the United States? How about Canada? May I ask why you ask these things of the US? Why the interest?
LOL, why do comments like this always come from Americans? Are they so insular they just can't imagine being interested in anywhere else?
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  #39  
Old Posted May 22, 2019, 9:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Actually, they're two sides of the same coin. Canadian immigration streams are largely the same as U.S. immigration streams, and the U.S. is somewhat more of a first choice but also somewhat more difficult to gain entry.

So when U.S. restricts certain groups (or qualifications) they usually end up in Canada. That's why Persians were big in the U.S. in the 70's and then big in Canada immediately thereafter, following U.S. restrictions.
That's somewhat the case, but not entirely (it's true that similar timings of immigration for groups like Jews, Eastern Europeans, Italians, Chinese etc. existed for Canada and the US, with some lag because the US was more restrictive and led to Canada being the second choice). There's also the British and French colonial legacy for Canada that influences things in a way that doesn't for the US. And then there's the Latino influence (connection to Spanish-speaking countries, be they Cuba, Mexico, or the Dominican Republic) in the US that there isn't in Canada.

British themselves moved to Canada at really high rates until the 60s, something which never happened in the US, past colonial times.

Many Indians moved to Canada because of the Commonwealth ties, rather than IT/tech unlike in the US. Many Hong Kongers moved to Canada, again because of Commonwealth ties rather than the US, where Chinese-origin immigrants more likely come from China (though Canada also had lots of mainland Chinese immigration after the Hong Kong wave) or Taiwan.

And Canada has immigrant groups that are present because of French language skills in the points system offering them access to Quebec, like French-educated Haitians, Francophone West/North Africans, Lebanese etc. that there aren't as much of stateside.
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  #40  
Old Posted May 22, 2019, 9:16 PM
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I spent some time in Mexico and while there are things I like about that country I would never want the US to be Mexico 2.0.
the sooner we're all one brown androgynous blob the better humanity will be
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