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  #61  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 2:22 PM
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Originally Posted by park123 View Post
The only significant retail area that I'm aware of is Pioneer Blvd in Artesia. That's actually a pretty impressive Indian street, to the point where I wonder how they can even maintain it with a small South Asian population.
That South Asian section of Pioneer Boulevard (not officially but colloquially known as "Little India") has been around for decades, and started forming in the 1980s. It has been, and I assume continues to be, a big regional draw, not just from around greater LA, but from further points. There have been local news reports of people traveling there from San Diego, Phoenix, and even Texas, just to buy the goods.
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  #62  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 4:45 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
"Asia" goes al the way west to Turkey, and includes everything east of the Caucasus/Ural Mountains in a geographic sense. Yet the list of "Asians" seems to exclude groups like Iranians (many 100s of thousands in L.A. area), Arabs, Israelis, Siberians etc. How does the Census Bureau define "Asian"? In the geographic meaning, as a person from Asia? Both Iran and India are in Asia, yet the list includes Indians but doesn't include Iranians, or many other nationalities that are also Asian and have significant numbers of immigrants in the U.S.
Yeah yeah we know but most people when using the term "Asian" in the USA mean East Asian.

Lots of people dont even use Asian to define Indians/Pakistanis and Bangladeshis typically lumping them all in as "Indian"

I know In England and Europe they use Asian to primarily describe Middle Eastern and Indian people.
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  #63  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 5:03 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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South Asian

Chicago 265,485
Washington 238,503
Dallas 202,067
Houston 185,228
Philadelphia 141,995
Atlanta 138,580
Seattle 103,260
Boston 102,067
Detroit 99,380
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  #64  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 5:04 PM
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every ohio city and county ranked for asians --

hats off to suburban columbus dublin, oh -- you are the winner:

https://www.cleveland.com/datacentra..._county_8.html
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  #65  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 8:00 PM
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South Asian

Chicago 265,485
Washington 238,503
Dallas 202,067
Houston 185,228
Philadelphia 141,995
Atlanta 138,580
Seattle 103,260
Boston 102,067
Detroit 99,380
In terms of "other" (non-Indian) South Asians, looks like Washington is the largest with 68,000 (mostly Pakistani) after NYC. Chicago, Houston and LA all have around 40,000 each.
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  #66  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 8:39 PM
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How significant is the population who are not single-response Asian (more than one Asian ancestry) in most cities, and do some places have more than others (say, those where a "pan-Asian American" identity has developed)? I'd imagine on the mainland US there'd be more single-ancestry responses but places like Hawaii had long enough generations of Asian immigration that many are mixed between Asian groups (kind of like how many white Americans are part Irish, part German, Italian etc.).

How big is the share of people who are "Asian" but more than one type of "Asian" vs. "mixed Asian and a non-Asian group" relative to single origin responses?
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  #67  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 12:03 AM
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Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
every ohio city and county ranked for asians --

hats off to suburban columbus dublin, oh -- you are the winner:

https://www.cleveland.com/datacentra..._county_8.html
This is the reasons why I was in Columbus, Worthington, and Dublin last May: the Midwest’s largest remaining expat Japanese community tied to auto production and its supply chain. Marysville has a really big Honda plant.
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  #68  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 1:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
How significant is the population who are not single-response Asian (more than one Asian ancestry) in most cities, and do some places have more than others (say, those where a "pan-Asian American" identity has developed)? I'd imagine on the mainland US there'd be more single-ancestry responses but places like Hawaii had long enough generations of Asian immigration that many are mixed between Asian groups (kind of like how many white Americans are part Irish, part German, Italian etc.).

How big is the share of people who are "Asian" but more than one type of "Asian" vs. "mixed Asian and a non-Asian group" relative to single origin responses?
As of 2018, according to US Census estimates the two or more Asian (mixed within Asian ethnicities only) population was 437,213. Other Asian not specified was 175,607 of the 18,415,198 Asians that reported Asian Ancestry alone (not mixed outside of the Asian racial category as defined by the US Census which is mainly South, East & Southeast Asian -- does not include West Asian).

As of 2018 these were the largest Asian alone ethnic groups in the US:

Chinese, except Taiwanese 4,217,892
Asian Indian 4,161,088
Filipino 2,920,160
Vietnamese 1,862,395
Korean 1,468,279
Japanese 782,776
Pakistani 487,937
Hmong 305,323
Cambodian 240,379
Thai 218,514
Bangladeshi 203,845
Laotian 203,494
Burmese 178,490
Taiwanese 178,020
Nepalese 167,468
Indonesian 70,851
Sri Lankan 52,183
Bhutanese 30,162
Mongolian 22,091
Malaysian 20,599
Okinawan 3,715
Other Asian, specified 6,717
Other Asian, not specified 175,607
Two or more Asian 437,213

Total Asian alone or in Combination (2018): 22,942,648
Chinese, except Taiwanese 5,143,982
Asian Indian 4,506,308
Filipino 4,089,570
Vietnamese 2,162,610
Korean 1,894,131
Japanese 1,542,195
Pakistani 526,956
Thai 329,343
Hmong 320,164
Cambodian 300,360
Laotian 262,229
Taiwanese 213,774
Bangladeshi 213,372
Burmese 189,250
Nepalese 175,005
Indonesian 116,869
Sri Lankan 61,416
Malaysian 35,716
Bhutanese 32,130
Mongolian 28,538
Okinawan 17,389
Other Asian, specified 8,851
Other Asian, not specified 772,490

Burmese/Myanmarese, Nepalese/Nepali & Bangladeshi are among the fastest growing of the relatively newer Asian ethnic/national groups in the U.S.

To put the enormity of the Asian alone population into context if they were to (hypothetically-speaking) form their own country it would rank as the 63rd largest in the World -- just below Chile.
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  #69  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 2:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
This is the reasons why I was in Columbus, Worthington, and Dublin last May: the Midwest’s largest remaining expat Japanese community tied to auto production and its supply chain. Marysville has a really big Honda plant.
I would imagine Detroit has, by far, the largest Japanese automotive expat population. Every Japanese automotive supplier/engineering concern is in Detroit. Novi, MI has a huge Japanese infrastructure, from Japanese signage in the hospital, to a Japanese school, to a bunch of restaurants and stores. The Detroit airport even has announcements in Japanese.

The vast majority of auto jobs are with the suppliers and engineering concerns, not the car companies themselves.
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  #70  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 2:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I would imagine Detroit has, by far, the largest Japanese automotive expat population. Every Japanese automotive supplier/engineering concern is in Detroit. Novi, MI has a huge Japanese infrastructure, from Japanese signage in the hospital, to a Japanese school, to a bunch of restaurants and stores. The Detroit airport even has announcements in Japanese.

The vast majority of auto jobs are with the suppliers and engineering concerns, not the car companies themselves.
Note how many more people there are as many people of partial Japanese ancestry as full Japanese ancestry? There's a reason for this: The Japanese diaspora in the U.S. does not really form coherent ethnic communities (outside of Hawaii) and intermarries into the white population at very high levels.

Historically speaking, Japan has always tended to see those who go overseas as "betraying" Japanese culture to some extent - which is why for example the Japanese Brazilians who have moved back to Japan have not been embraced. This stands in contrast to the Chinese, who will continue to accept people as being ethnically Chinese even if they're from families who have lived abroad for centuries.
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  #71  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 2:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I would imagine Detroit has, by far, the largest Japanese automotive expat population. Every Japanese automotive supplier/engineering concern is in Detroit. Novi, MI has a huge Japanese infrastructure, from Japanese signage in the hospital, to a Japanese school, to a bunch of restaurants and stores. The Detroit airport even has announcements in Japanese.

The vast majority of auto jobs are with the suppliers and engineering concerns, not the car companies themselves.
Yeah... The Toyota R&D center for North America (Toyota Technical Center) is near Ann Arbor, and the CEO of Toyota North America was based in Metro Detroit at one point. But I'm not sure what the structure is now that Toyota has moved to Plano.
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  #72  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 2:43 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Note how many more people there are as many people of partial Japanese ancestry as full Japanese ancestry? There's a reason for this: The Japanese diaspora in the U.S. does not really form coherent ethnic communities (outside of Hawaii) and intermarries into the white population at very high levels.
Yeah, but these aren't Japanese immigrants. Detroit has very few Japanese immigrants or permanent residents of Japanese descent. Rather, it has a ton of Japanese expats, who are here for their auto jobs for a few years, and live in a bit of an expat bubble while here. I assume they re-assimilate just fine when they return to Japan.
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  #73  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 3:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Yeah, but these aren't Japanese immigrants. Detroit has very few Japanese immigrants or permanent residents of Japanese descent. Rather, it has a ton of Japanese expats, who are here for their auto jobs for a few years, and live in a bit of an expat bubble while here. I assume they re-assimilate just fine when they return to Japan.
Japanese expats have no trouble assimilating back into Japan. Getting sent to NYC or Detroit or LA is a sign of elite status. They typically enjoy their 3 years in America, and then go back to Japan.

There are almost no real Japanese immigrants in America anymore. Some Japanese girls marry local American guys, and some really adventurous young Japanese settle for the freedom they find here. But not in large numbers.

Brazilian Japanese are looked down on in Japan because they are perceived as being poor, uneducated, and from a poor country. For example I had a Brazilian-Japanese friend who was working at a bank in NY, visit his distant relatives in Kobe, and they were very circumspect about him probably because they thought he would ask them for money or a place to stay. Actually he made much more than they did.

Japanese Americans aren't so much looked down on in Japan as just not considered Japanese at all. Unless they speak fluent, unaccented Japanese. "Kitchen Japanese" doesn't cut it over there.
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  #74  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 3:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
Indian

New York 714,036
Bay Area 369,706
Los Angeles 193,288

Filipino

Los Angeles 636,217
Bay Area 427,112
New York 247,836

Vietnamese

Los Angeles 370,378
Bay Area 222,597
New York 43,174

Korean

Los Angeles 368,079
New York 222,328
Bay Area 92,416
The Indian count for LA is actually quite a bit more than what I thought... well on its way to breaking 200,000. Still a large figure taken on its own.

And these figures reaffirm my earlier observations... NYC has a very, very poor showing of Vietnamese. Houston, Dallas, DC, Seattle, and San Diego (at 1/7th the population) have larger Vietnamese communities.

Ditto with Koreans and the Bay Area.
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  #75  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 3:34 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
That statement is funny to me because that is not my experience where I live in LA County. I'm not doubting whatever the numbers are, but I guess because I grew up in Cerritos where Indians seem almost ubiquitous (I went to school with a lot of Indians, and some Sri Lankans too), especially in the Little India area of the neighboring city of Artesia.
Cerritos in general is probably pound-for-pound the most “Asian all-around” municipality in the US, and maybe North America. Consider that it’s over 60% Asian and has a sizable showing and equitable distribution of all the major ethnic groups. Epodunk used to have a nice breakdown, but it’s no longer showing (they were based on the 2000 census anyway).
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  #76  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 3:35 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Note how many more people there are as many people of partial Japanese ancestry as full Japanese ancestry? There's a reason for this: The Japanese diaspora in the U.S. does not really form coherent ethnic communities (outside of Hawaii) and intermarries into the white population at very high levels.

Historically speaking, Japan has always tended to see those who go overseas as "betraying" Japanese culture to some extent - which is why for example the Japanese Brazilians who have moved back to Japan have not been embraced. This stands in contrast to the Chinese, who will continue to accept people as being ethnically Chinese even if they're from families who have lived abroad for centuries.
Most Japanese Americans are native born, unlike every other Asian group.
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  #77  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 5:32 PM
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back when i lived in cols i recall a couple japanese restaurants, but that was about it. nowadays, the japanese presence in dublin, ohio is growing and is much more than marysville auto. for one thing i imagine they like the golf, with jack nicklaus' home course muirfield being there lol.

this was surprising:

Japan is the No. 1 foreign investor in Ohio, with businesses providing about 71,000 jobs, or 30 percent of all employment from foreign companies in the state.

https://www.cityscenecolumbus.com/co...ese-community/

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt...n-central-ohio


as for integration, japanese kids get ell services of course and i see nowadays japanese is offered as a language option in the city schools. there is also at least one active japanese saturday school.

http://columbushoshuko.com/wordpress1/541-2/
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  #78  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 5:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
Cerritos in general is probably pound-for-pound the most “Asian all-around” municipality in the US, and maybe North America. Consider that it’s over 60% Asian and has a sizable showing and equitable distribution of all the major ethnic groups. Epodunk used to have a nice breakdown, but it’s no longer showing (they were based on the 2000 census anyway).
I remember in the late 80s or early 90s, that it came out in the news that Cerritos was considered the most ethnically diverse municipality in the entire US. Since the 90s, though, more and more Asians have moved in.
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  #79  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 5:57 PM
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Japanese expats have no trouble assimilating back into Japan. Getting sent to NYC or Detroit or LA is a sign of elite status. They typically enjoy their 3 years in America, and then go back to Japan.
I will agree with this. About a year and a half ago, my partner got a new job at a Japan-based company. He works with a lot of Japanese ex-pats and some Japanese women who married American men. Many of them talk about going back to Japan to visit family/relatives. My partner has had to learn adjusting to Japanese attitudes and work ethics, as well as their work procedures.

He also told me about OTAI (?), which is what Japanese nationals use for health insurance when they are abroad, at least in the LA area.
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  #80  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 9:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
The Indian count for LA is actually quite a bit more than what I thought... well on its way to breaking 200,000. Still a large figure taken on its own.

And these figures reaffirm my earlier observations... NYC has a very, very poor showing of Vietnamese. Houston, Dallas, DC, Seattle, and San Diego (at 1/7th the population) have larger Vietnamese communities.

Ditto with Koreans and the Bay Area.
NYC is about as global a city in terms of demographics as you can find but yeah Southeast Asians are a group with little visible presence. East Africans are another.
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