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  #101  
Old Posted Nov 3, 2019, 9:19 PM
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Atlanta has a growing Korean population. Kia built a big factory in Georgia and Hyundai near the Georgia border in Alabama. SK is also building a $1.7 billion battery factory in Georgia. https://www.ajc.com/news/state--regi...sos4mSwwWdl3M/

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  #102  
Old Posted Nov 3, 2019, 10:23 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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Geographic distribution of Asian ethnic groups.

West

Japanese 71%
Filipino 65%
Vietnamese 48%
Chinese 45%
Korean 43%
Indian 25%

California

Filipino 46%
Vietnamese 37%
Chinese 36%
Japanese 35%
Korean 32%
Indian 19%
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  #103  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 9:57 PM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
^ The numbers show that San Diego County and the LA CSA (roughly 5.5 times larger) essentially have an identical share of Indians (and SD has a thriving biotech economy). In fact, Irvine (population 275,000) is home to an Indian population (6% share) that numbers slightly less than half of SD County's total.

But on a slightly un/related note, the numbers do illustrate that SD's extremely Filipino... even more so than the Bay Area.

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...prodType=table
However I do think the demographic trends in LA could change a lot in the future. LA might have a major S. Asian enclave in several decades.
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  #104  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 12:00 AM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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Originally Posted by Labtec View Post

I'm highly suspicious that these German speaking states are not correct.

German immigration to the US stopped like at least 100 years ago. Plus, those western states were never huge German centers.

I'd suspect that almost all of these states have either a Chinese language or possibly an Indian subcontinent based language as their third most spoken.
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  #105  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 12:48 AM
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Never realized how many Filipinos lived here until I moved.
They're not talked about as much, for some reason.


But some of these are very weird. Korean for Virgina? I guess, but what's the actual population for Koreans in the state?
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  #106  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 1:32 AM
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
I'm highly suspicious that these German speaking states are not correct.

German immigration to the US stopped like at least 100 years ago. Plus, those western states were never huge German centers.

I'd suspect that almost all of these states have either a Chinese language or possibly an Indian subcontinent based language as their third most spoken.
Ohio has a large population of Amish, and most of them speak the German dialect of Pennsylvania Dutch at home. And the far western edge of the state is still highly isolated German-American communities and it's probably not anyone's first language but I'm sure there's still some sporadic usage of it.

Cleveland also has a reasonably-sized proportion of Germans who fled to the US after WWII ended and the Communists started to move in.
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  #107  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 1:49 AM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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Ohio I can see. It's not a very ethnic state these days, but can see the Amish population keeping German (or a variety of it) still in use. But German speakers are third most in Colorado? Give me a break.

Also, Italian in NJ and PA is wrong. Theres no way. I'd bet money that in PA as well as NJ it's again, another asian language.
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  #108  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 5:07 AM
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Colorado has very little immigration other than Spanish speaking, and it's the same with the other states. But I agree that German sounds farfetched.
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  #109  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 12:35 PM
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I think it makes sense. Lots of elderly Germans in certain states, and manufacturing states have tons of short-term German expats. Germany was a big immigration source after WW2.

And plenty of Italian Americans in places like NJ have some rudimentary Italian language comprehension. Indians are split up in a billion languages. I think actually Yiddish might be in the running in the top few languages in NY and NJ.
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  #110  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 1:04 PM
goldeneyed goldeneyed is offline
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
Ohio I can see. It's not a very ethnic state these days, but can see the Amish population keeping German (or a variety of it) still in use. But German speakers are third most in Colorado? Give me a break.

Also, Italian in NJ and PA is wrong. Theres no way. I'd bet money that in PA as well as NJ it's again, another asian language.
New Jersey and Colorado seem correct according to 2010 numbers
https://apps.mla.org/cgi-shl/docstud...p_data_results

But we are now almost 10 years later, so I'm sure Italian is not first anymore in NJ.
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  #111  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 3:54 PM
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California, and more specifically, the Bay Area, may have had a lot of recent growth (and perhaps a higher share from recent growth), but it's a bit reaching to claim the Chicago or NYC metro was more well-established than the West coasters in this regard.

There were already thousands of Sikhs living in California over 100 years ago.

The first Indian American and Asian American in general to be elected to congress came from California's early Indian/South Asian community.

Dalip Singh Saund (September 20, 1899 – April 22, 1973) was an American politician who was a member of the United States House of Representatives. He served the 29th District of California from January 3, 1957 to January 3, 1963. He was the first Sikh American, the first Asian American, the first Indian American and the first member of a non-Abrahamic faith to be elected to Congress.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalip_Singh_Saund

https://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/echo...dom/title-page

San Francisco in the 1910s to late 1940s even was the headquarters of an Indian revolutionary movement (albeit one that failed in its goals) that included Punjabi migrant workers and intellectuals and students in the US and abroad trying to fight for India's independence against what was then British colonial rule.

NorCal and SoCal alike have had South Asians long before any IT boom.

https://medium.com/secret-desi-history

http://religionclasss2014.blogspot.c...s-angeles.html
Excellent post.
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  #112  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 8:38 PM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Originally Posted by dimondpark View Post
Excellent post.
There are a lot of Punjabi/Sikh communities in CA's Central Valley from Fresno to Yuba City. They tend to be more working class than the Hindu community.
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  #113  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 10:45 PM
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I haven't really seen numbers for Sikhs in the US. California I assume has the most.
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  #114  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 2:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
I haven't really seen numbers for Sikhs in the US. California I assume has the most.
Queens has a ton too - especially in Richmond Hills. Has to be at least 100k in Queens alone.
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  #115  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
Ohio I can see. It's not a very ethnic state these days, but can see the Amish population keeping German (or a variety of it) still in use. But German speakers are third most in Colorado? Give me a break.

Also, Italian in NJ and PA is wrong. Theres no way. I'd bet money that in PA as well as NJ it's again, another asian language.
It's kinda refreshing that the Italian language is still third in NJ and PA. If only more Italians came to PA and replaced the Germans as the largest European group, PA might be a more fun place, almost like NY
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  #116  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 4:53 PM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Colorado has very little immigration other than Spanish speaking, and it's the same with the other states. But I agree that German sounds farfetched.
I think the German language was kept on the downlow after WW2 in a lot of the US....I had no idea a lot of my family in south Texas spoke German and didn't believe it until I asked my grandmother.... after which she broke out in fluent German....she was in her 80's at the time and it was the first time I heard it.
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  #117  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 6:23 PM
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Most of these states where German is the most common non-English/Spanish language have a very low percentage of foreign language speakers to begin with.
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  #118  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted by East7thStreet View Post
I think the German language was kept on the downlow after WW2 in a lot of the US....I had no idea a lot of my family in south Texas spoke German and didn't believe it until I asked my grandmother.... after which she broke out in fluent German....she was in her 80's at the time and it was the first time I heard it.
Now that you bring it up I wonder to what degree non-responses or under-reporting (or in some cases over reporting, for instance, saying you speak a language when you barely know a few words) knowledge of a language skews any of the results.

I'd imagine that survey data is less personal and people have less incentive to hide/mask what languages they do or don't know than say, in person (where someone might say that they know a language to show off, or not know it because they want to feel "assimilated" and think speaking that language is not something they're particularly proud of).
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  #119  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
I haven't really seen numbers for Sikhs in the US. California I assume has the most.
Is this because the ethnoreligious group of Sikhs is considered a religious grouping not an ethnic one by the US Census and thus is similar to the situation where it's difficult to count how many people identify as Jewish ethnically separately from Judaism as a religion?
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  #120  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 11:55 PM
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It's hard to find up to date language data, but according to the 2010 census 104,000 spoke Panjabi at home in California - just under half of all Panjabi speakers in the US.

https://apps.mla.org/map_data
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