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  #641  
Old Posted May 2, 2019, 11:07 PM
CityTech CityTech is offline
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^^ My family cottage is located right in that white hole between Ottawa & Toronto. For quite a long time now that has been the last remaining part of Southern Ontario without cell coverage. It's nearly devoid of inhabitants--the density is around 1-2 people per square kilometre or possibly even less. The largest community in there is Cloyne, Ontario, with a population of less than one hundred. It roughly corresponds to the big green mass here: https://www.google.com/maps/@44.7997.../data=!3m1!1e3
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  #642  
Old Posted May 3, 2019, 7:43 PM
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  #643  
Old Posted May 22, 2019, 4:45 PM
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Maps of immigration to Toronto over time: http://www.torontotransforms.com/%E2...ion-1900-2006/


1951-1960





1971-1980





2001-2005

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  #644  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 12:08 PM
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Canada divided into 4 areas of equal population:



from:https://www.reddit.com/r/MapPorn/com...ions_of_equal/

Largest cities in the yellow portion:

Windsor, ON -- 392k
St. John's, NL -- 205k
Barrie, ON -- 197k
Sudbury, ON -- 165k
Saguenay, PQ -- 161k
Moncton, NB -- 145k
Saint John, NB -- 126k
Thunder Bay, ON --121k
Chatham-Kent, ON -- 102k
Fredericton, NB --102k
Cape Breton, NS -- 99k
Sarnia, ON - 96k
Prince George, BC -- 86k
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  #645  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 9:06 PM
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Percentage of foreign born population in Canada by province:

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  #646  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 9:24 PM
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^^ No big surprises, BC and Ontario most foreign born and Newfoundland Labrador least amount.

Quebec at 14% seems on the low side of what I would've predicted especially with Haiti & the amount of African nations speaking french that could be a main draw to that province out of all others.


Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbanite View Post
Canada divided into 4 areas of equal population:

from:https://www.reddit.com/r/MapPorn/com...ions_of_equal/

Largest cities in the yellow portion:

Windsor, ON -- 392k
St. John's, NL -- 205k
Barrie, ON -- 197k
Sudbury, ON -- 165k
Saguenay, PQ -- 161k
Moncton, NB -- 145k
Saint John, NB -- 126k
Thunder Bay, ON --121k
Chatham-Kent, ON -- 102k
Fredericton, NB --102k
Cape Breton, NS -- 99k
Sarnia, ON - 96k
Prince George, BC -- 86k
I wonder which region Halifax would be in... maybe with Sable Island being part of the city but 300kms away, city got kicked out of the Yellow zone?
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  #647  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 10:35 PM
Mikemike Mikemike is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbanite View Post
Canada divided into 4 areas of equal population:



from:https://www.reddit.com/r/MapPorn/com...ions_of_equal/


....
It's not the same with the Ontario and Quebec regions, but in the West Edmonton, Saskatoon and Winnipeg are all at the extreme edges of the purple so you could make a map that looks almost the same but with 2,500,000 more people in the yellow than the others, and 2,500,000 fewer in the purple.

Still a cool map though.
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  #648  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 10:52 PM
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Huh, this does not seem to be the national population divided by four. 37 million/4 is 9.25 million, and none of those groups have even close to that.

Either way, I feel like a 5-way division would be more sensible.
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  #649  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 11:16 PM
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  #650  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 11:21 PM
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What Americans think when visiting Canada



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  #651  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 11:23 PM
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Most common surnames in each of Canada's provinces and territories

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  #652  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2019, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ainvan View Post
so somehow Northern Calgary ends up becoming the largest city in "BC"...


It's weird how the delineations in the east make sense, but those in the west... not so much.
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  #653  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 12:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadillaccc View Post
It's weird how the delineations in the east make sense, but those in the west... not so much.
I wouldn't say "Province of Inner Toronto", "Province of Outer Toronto", "Province of Niagara" makes much sense...
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  #654  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 1:40 AM
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Usually it's written as Macdonald, not MacDonald. For example it's the Angus L. Macdonald bridge.

There might be a bunch of spelling issues in general. Lee could be an English or Chinese surname (also sometime Li). Wong and be Wang, and then there's a variety of Chang/Chong/Chen/Cheug type names which I assume are all the same?

LeBlanc doesn't really surprise me for NB or NS. There are a lot of Anglophones in NS with French surnames whose ancestors in NS would have spoken French a few generations ago, along with some who are still Francophones. It's probably as much historically ethnically French (or other Francophones like French Swiss) as it is Scottish even post deportation.
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  #655  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 2:26 AM
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Here in Timmins, ON the most common surnames are Roy and Tremblay for sure. I wouldn't be surprised if Gagnon and Côté are next just like in Quebec. But Morin is probably #2 or 3.

Smith is probably in the top 10 but maybe #7 or 8. I would guess that 8 or 9 of the top 10 names are French-Canadian.

Martin is definitely in the top 10 but it can be French, Scottish, English or Irish here.
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  #656  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 2:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Usually it's written as Macdonald, not MacDonald. For example it's the Angus L. Macdonald bridge.

There might be a bunch of spelling issues in general. Lee could be an English or Chinese surname (also sometime Li). Wong and be Wang, and then there's a variety of Chang/Chong/Chen/Cheug type names which I assume are all the same?

LeBlanc doesn't really surprise me for NB or NS. There are a lot of Anglophones in NS with French surnames whose ancestors in NS would have spoken French a few generations ago, along with some who are still Francophones. It's probably as much historically ethnically French (or other Francophones like French Swiss) as it is Scottish even post deportation.
Generally the people who put together these lists account for spelling issues, and Smith and Smyth are grouped together, as are Clarke and Clark, Arseneau and Arsenault and Arsenault, etc.

Another thing is that some groups have a lot of bunching up into only a small number of surnames. For example Sikhs with Singh, Koreans with Park or Kim or Vietnamese people with Nguyen.

I believe you have something like that going on with Acadians and a name like LeBlanc (Leblanc) and also Cormier. The anglo population of NB is bigger but has a greater surname diversity than the Acadians.

Another example is for example how in Montreal names like Nguyen and Patel make the top 10 list alongside names like Tremblay and Gagnon, whereas the Vietnamese and Indian communities are not really that big and probably don't even crack the top 10 in terms of ethnic groups.
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  #657  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 3:38 AM
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I'm a little surprised that Mennonite surnames take 3 of the top 4 spots for Manitoba... I knew they were common but I didn't quite realize they were that common.
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  #658  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 4:08 AM
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They won't all be Mennonite. Many of them will just be people of German stock.
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  #659  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 4:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I'm a little surprised that Mennonite surnames take 3 of the top 4 spots for Manitoba... I knew they were common but I didn't quite realize they were that common.
I don’t believe it. Wiebe over Brown, Johnson etc?? That has to be a mistake.
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  #660  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2019, 4:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
They won't all be Mennonite. Many of them will just be people of German stock.
In MB, those are all 100% Mennonite surnames.

Although I also doubt the fact they make up the three of the top four surnames here.
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