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  #81  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 2:53 PM
Viktorkrum77 Viktorkrum77 is offline
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I suppose this doesn't qualify as a skyscraper, but it's still tragic, for me anyways.

This is the Saginaw County Courthouse, destroyed in the height of the urban renewal of the 70s to make way for a monstrosity that did nothing but uglify what once was a beautiful city--they worsened it with the destruction of blocks upon blocks of downtown buildings to make way for now vacant buildings or empty lots, and of course the number of old houses they razed would make you sick.



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  #82  
Old Posted May 30, 2010, 9:30 PM
maikeli maikeli is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
i'm interested in compiling a list of the tallest buildings ever to be voluntarily demolished. what i mean by that is perfectly fine and structurally sound buildings that were taken down purely at the choice of the owner, usually for the purpose of erecting an even taller structure. what i'm not inlcuding here are towers that have been destroyed or damaged in attacks (wtc), or towers that were later taken down after they had been struck by a great calamity such as a bad fire or a tornado or an earthquake, etc.

this is what i have so far, if anyone has info about the buildings i have question marks (?) for, please add everything you know about when and why the building was demolished.









8. CAGA House, Sydney - 410 ft. - demolished in 1992 because ?

image needed






.
CAGA house demolished in 1992 because of Governor Phillip tower

Last edited by maikeli; Jun 15, 2010 at 8:43 AM.
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  #83  
Old Posted May 31, 2010, 5:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Latoso View Post
Masonic Temple Building in Chicago
Destroyed: 1939 For no good reason.
Well, there was a Great Depression going on. Construction of the State Street Subway was going to require replacement of the building's floating foundation with caissons, at a cost of $100,000. The lower nine floors were designed for shops that faced the interior rotunda, and many of those spaces were undoubtedly vacant after a decade of hard times. The top four floors had been built for Masonic halls. So they were facing a huge structural repair, tough times with hard-to-renovate space, and very low demand for 40-year-old office space on State Street.

Unfortunately, mortals have to make decisions based on their best judgment at the time.
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  #84  
Old Posted May 31, 2010, 5:59 AM
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Historic preservation, at least in American cities, is only a 40-year-old phenomenon. Truly important landmarks were saved, but there was none of the nostalgic "save it because it is better than anything that might replace it" feeling that drives modern historic preservation in America.
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  #85  
Old Posted May 31, 2010, 10:50 AM
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tragic thread
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  #86  
Old Posted May 31, 2010, 2:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viktorkrum77 View Post
I suppose this doesn't qualify as a skyscraper, but it's still tragic, for me anyways.

This is the Saginaw County Courthouse, destroyed in the height of the urban renewal of the 70s to make way for a monstrosity that did nothing but uglify what once was a beautiful city--they worsened it with the destruction of blocks upon blocks of downtown buildings to make way for now vacant buildings or empty lots, and of course the number of old houses they razed would make you sick.



what a sick joke. really. poor saginaw.
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  #87  
Old Posted May 31, 2010, 4:03 PM
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So sad for Saginaw. Was there recently, and the place looked like a disaster zone. Ditto for Flint.
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  #88  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2010, 6:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maikeli View Post
CAGA house demolished in 1992 because of Governor Phillip tower
Would you mind editing your post so that it doesn't quote the entire (massive) OP? : P
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  #89  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2010, 2:17 PM
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The Ten Eyck Hotel in Albany, NY
15 stories, demolished in 1972



Credit: http://www.acphs.edu/1910s.html


was replaced by this:



Credit: markstemp58 http://www.flickr.com/photos/40397489@N00/2629423250/
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  #90  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2011, 1:39 PM
z1x2c3v4b5 z1x2c3v4b5 is offline
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The old Industrial Trust Building (Providence, RI).

Replaced with One Financial Plaza:

Pic from evolvingcritic.com
Not really a terrible building, but I liked the old one better.
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  #91  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 3:51 AM
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The Hotel Wolverine in Detroit was destroyed for an extension of the Comerica Park PARKING LOT!!!
Also, the historic Solar One/ Solar Two tower was destroyed, supposedly for a new larger solar power plant, instead of saving it and using the equally sized farmland circles that surround it! The useful hardware was salvaged but nothing was saved from the 300+ foot tower
http://www.desertdispatch.com/news/b...ett-going.html
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  #92  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 4:21 AM
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Some Cleveland towers (thanks to clevelandskyscraperpage.com):


clevelandskyscrapers.com
Williamson Building
Built 1900, Demolished 1982 for BP Tower


clevelandskyscrapers.com
Union National Bank Building
Built 1916, Demolished 1950s for ?


clevelandskyscrapers.com
Engineers Building
Built 1910, Demolished 1989 (for Marriott Key Center?)


clevelandskyscrapers.com
Cuyahoga Building
Built 1892, Demolished 1982 for BP Tower
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  #93  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Historic preservation, at least in American cities, is only a 40-year-old phenomenon. Truly important landmarks were saved, but there was none of the nostalgic "save it because it is better than anything that might replace it" feeling that drives modern historic preservation in America.
i hate to be nitpicky, but Charleston, SC and New Orleans have historic preservation older than 40 years. but 40-50 years is the age of historic preservation most everywhere else.

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  #94  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 11:12 PM
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The oldest historic preservation ordinances in the United States (First Historic Districts):

1931 Charleston, S.C.
1937 New Orleans, LA
1946 Alexandria, VA
1948 Winston-Salem, N.C.
1949 Santa Barbara, CA

Many of these cities did historic surveys during the Great Depression and these surveys led to the present day historic districts. Historic preservation didn't become really popular in the United States until the late 1960's, when everyone was excited about the Bicentennial in 1976 and celebration planning was beginning. Around the mid-1970s, 250 cities had preservation ordinances. This was also the peak of "heritage tourism."
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  #95  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2011, 11:28 PM
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An edict from Roman Emperor Iulius Valerius Maiorianus (Reign April 1, 457 – August 2, 461) on historical preservation:

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  #96  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2011, 7:59 PM
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A couple from the city that hates it's heritage... Toronto:

Old Toronto Star Building:



Demolished in 1972 to build First Canadian Place (still the tallest building in Canada):


...

Toronto Armouries:


Demolished in 1966 to build the York County Court House:
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  #97  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2011, 1:08 AM
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This thread makes me sick.
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  #98  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2011, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich View Post
But, like the Hudsons, they'd tried putting out proposals for redevelopment for years, and no solid ones were coming in because of the sheer size of the building, and the cost it would have taken to redevelop. At least, that's what the city said...
I thought they demolished that building to make room for a really nice apartment building, I saw the renders and it looked just like what was once there.

so now nothing is getting built there?
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  #99  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2012, 7:19 AM
maikeli maikeli is offline
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Here is photos of the P.A.H demoliton







[IMG]photos.rosenlund.com.au/Jobs/PA-Hospital/i-5DrGmkK/0/M/04-M.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]photos.rosenlund.com.au/Jobs/PA-Hospital/i-jJWf8Vw/0/M/09-M.jpg[/IMG]
And pre demolition photos




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  #100  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2012, 1:08 PM
stormkingfan stormkingfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
Personally I wish that One Liberty Plaza,


Would be demolished in order to build:
The Singer Building, and...


...The City Investing Buiding


What a tragedy!
My thoughts exactly. They should've left those two old bldgs alone!!
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