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  #27401  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 1:03 PM
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From the 1938 CD, Lionel E Kent ran a real estate business at 6022 Wilshire Boulevard, Shirley Simon ran Shirley's, a dress shop at 6024 Wilshire Boulevard, and Majestic Upholstery at 6026 Wilshire Boulevard appears to have been a trading name of Abraham Schlamovitch. The directory also lists Benjamin and Charles Schlamovitch as upholsterers - I'm guessing that they were related.


LAPL

The 1942 CD lists 6022 Wilshire Boulevard as the Alan Building, and Shirley Simon seems to be the only one of the 1938 residents who's still there.

A small part of the building is just visible on the left of this detail from a 1952 photo that I originally posted in post #25076.


Detail of picture in USC Digital Library

To me, it looks like the building's appearance has already been changed from the one seen in 1937, but I'm not sure that it matches the one we see today. The question is: was the Alan Building remodeled or replaced?


GSV
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  #27402  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 2:06 PM
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The Billows Motel - "20 ultra modern spacious motel units in refined location", and "recommended by Knott's Berry Farm".



eBay

The Billows seems to have become the Shamrock Motel by 1962, and was still going by that name in 1969. The photograph below is undated.


William Bird on Flickr

The 1973 CD doesn't mention a motel at 6220 S La Brea Avenue. The only entry for that address is Jack L Spangler. By 1987, the Shamrock had become the Travel King Motel. Below is an aerial image from 1980. The main layout doesn't appear to change from 1952 (the earliest image at Historic Aerials) until 1994 (the last image where the motel is visible on Historic Aerials). The images from 2003 to 2005 show just a single building remaining at the southern end of the plot (I'm assuming it's the same one as in the image below). The whole site is now empty.


Historic Aerials
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  #27403  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 4:15 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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1930 - 3607 - 3601 West 3rd Street (Still there - without the gingerbread)

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...id/16936/rec/5




No waiting at Al's Barber Shop?








Al's apparently features an exciting array of lilac and rose water.









Don't be silly, it's Mrs. Zilly's!





http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...id/16936/rec/5

Last edited by Tourmaline; Apr 2, 2015 at 4:58 PM.
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  #27404  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 5:01 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Museum Row / Churrigueresque

Thanks HossC for the background on 6022 Wilshire Boulevard. Curbed LA reports that that end of the block is coming down for the new Purple Line Station. The Architecture + Design Museum is moving to the Arts District.

Reports here and here


gsv


------------------------------------------------------------


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
1930 - 3607 - 3601 West 3rd Street (Still there - without the gingerbread)



The Churrigueresque Revival style was very popular in Southern California and still graces some of our best-loved buildings (Chapman Market, Beverly Hills City Hall, etc)

It was Irving Gill's refusal to work in this style re San Diego's 1915-1916 Panama-California Exhibition which caused his break with Bertram G. Goodhue and Elmer Gray. Gill disliked copying decorative historic styles and endeavored to develop a new, local architecture. However, the public enthusiastically embraced Churrigueresque Revival as expressed in San Diego. It remained popular through to the 1930s when Streamline took over.

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 2, 2015 at 7:44 PM. Reason: add quoted photo
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  #27405  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 5:56 PM
KevinW KevinW is offline
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Wow, I haven't been down Overland for awhile. At least the old Starbucks kept the Ship's building. This modern mishmash is horrible.


October 2012:


January 2015:


gsv
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  #27406  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 6:18 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post


From the 1938 CD, Lionel E Kent ran a real estate business at 6022 Wilshire Boulevard, Shirley Simon ran Shirley's, a dress shop at 6024 Wilshire Boulevard, and Majestic Upholstery at 6026 Wilshire Boulevard appears to have been a trading name of Abraham Schlamovitch. The directory also lists Benjamin and Charles Schlamovitch as upholsterers - I'm guessing that they were related.


LAPL

The 1942 CD lists 6022 Wilshire Boulevard as the Alan Building, and Shirley Simon seems to be the only one of the 1938 residents who's still there.


The '56CD (and '60CD) lists Majestic at 265 S. La Brea, which means it may have occupied part of the structure currently used by Trader Joe's. The 56CD lists several drapers and upholsters. Address 271 S La Brea a Simca-Fiat dealership as well as "Good and Bad Furniture" and Richard W Lee furnishings. http://rescarta.lapl.org:8080/ResCar...00001/00000001

Plenty of posts on this location, e.g., http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...ostcount=10721 http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...ostcount=10722 GW's post seems to confirm a drug store, yet the '29CD lists, for the 263 S, La Brea address, a clothes cleaner, so I wonder if this wasn't like today's mini malls with several businesses under adjoining umbrellas, so to speak.



1937 - 677 S La Brea. Cedric's flowers with a sidewalk full of poinsettias. (First come, first serve.)
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059019.jpg


1937 - Familiar McDonnell's with E Clem Wilson in the background
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00008/00008723.jpg

Last edited by Tourmaline; Apr 2, 2015 at 6:30 PM.
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  #27407  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 6:25 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinW View Post
Wow, I haven't been down Overland for awhile. At least the old Starbucks kept the Ship's building. This modern mishmash is horrible.
LOL, when I first spotted those, I thought it was a collection of shacks. But, nothing lasts forever, this too shall pass.
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  #27408  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 6:39 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Was that an earthquake? Loud enough to wake the very dead?



There was blasting at the La Brea Tar Pits, to get at the tar.


1890 - La Brea Tar Pits
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics02/00010558.jpg
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  #27409  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 7:13 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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In this NLA LINK, FredH introduced us to Jan's Restuarant (aka Jan's Coffee Shop) by way of actress Gail Russell,
a gal with a slight drinking problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post
On July 6, 1957, she drove her car through the front of Jan's Restaurant at 8424 Beverly Blvd.


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/thed...l-russell.html

Surprisingly, Jan's Restaurant is still there...


Google Street View
Still there when FredH posted this on Feb. 1, 2014. While tooling around the internet looking into Ship's Coffee Shop yesterday,
I discovered some unwelcome news.

According to L.A. Eater:
As Los Angeles’ real estate market continues to soar (forcing potential homeowners and new businesses alike to scatter towards
the suburbs), plenty of old school restaurants are starting to feel the pinch. Case in point: Jan’s Family Restaurant on Beverly Boulevard,
which has existed at the same location for more than half a century. On March 15, they closed their doors for good. Furthermore,
the rumor du jour has it that the site will next accommodate a Chipotle, because apparently Los Angeles doesn’t have enough of
those. Want to experience Jan’s one last time? You’ll have to head over to Astro Family Restaurant in Silver Lake, which is owned and
operated by the same family.


There is already a Chipotle right around the corner from there near the Beverly Center. ?

Coffee Shop restaurants are disappearing. There used to be any number of them, both large and small, chains and single-owner places,
all around: I miss them. Where do people eat nowadays that want food like this?

I wasn't familiar with the Astro Family Restaurant, 2300 Fletcher Drive, Silver Lake, Los Angeles 90039. Here's a photo of it:

L.A. Facades

From another angle!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kansas...an/3359886111/

A commenter notes that this was originally built by Armet & Davis in 1958 as Conrad's Drive-In.

And in other Googie style Coffee Shop news, this from March 26th:

Celebrities Rally With Community To Save Norms Restaurant on La Cienega

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2015/...on-la-cienega/
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  #27410  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 7:21 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Little help.

Refresh my memory. Did someone establish the original building permit dates for the Sunset Hotel (703 N. Spring Street or more likely San Fernando Street) NW corner of Ord? And the original building permit dates for the San Fernando Hotel, NE corner of Ord? Seems like I remember seeing 1888 for both or maybe 1888 for one and 1887 for the other. Can't find any mention in the thread searcher thing. Thanks. Good post coming, I think.
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  #27411  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 8:39 PM
fhammon fhammon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
Was that an earthquake? Loud enough to wake the very dead?

There was blasting at the La Brea Tar Pits, to get at the tar.

1890 - La Brea Tar Pits
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics02/00010558.jpg
That could very well be the work of Edward Doheny although blasting wasn't mentioned here.

Quote:
While in Los Angeles, Doheny found out that there were reserves of natural asphalt which in places came to the surface, notably at the La Brea "tar pits". Doheny obtained a lease near downtown with $400 in financing from Canfield, who had made some money from the mining industry. In the fall of 1892 Doheny dug a well with picks and shovels, and a windlass, looking for asphalt, from which oil could be refined. When the well (6 feet (1.8 m) x 4 feet (1.2 m) wide) reached a depth of 155 feet (47 m), Doheny devised a drilling system involving a eucalyptus tree trunk.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_L._Doheny
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  #27412  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 8:56 PM
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Peat Fires

L.A. Creek Freak has an excellent article on the peat fires that plagued L.A. on and off for a couple of decades in the vicinity of Baldwin Hills.

Peat bog madness in LA


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  #27413  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 9:47 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fhammon View Post
That could very well be the work of Edward Doheny although blasting wasn't mentioned here.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_L._Doheny

Had the date been 25 years later, perhaps the picture could have been explained as a pyrotechnic related to a DWGriffith production.

http://rockcellarmagazine.com/wp-con...l-War-1915.jpg





Curious whether the dangers associated with this type of exploratory endeavor was fully appreciated in 1890. At the time, few would have been around to complain, and to whom would they complain and by what manner?




undated - An alleged oil well fire (or spritzer?) near Western Ave and 125 Street.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics45/00042278.jpg


1924 - smoke from 125th Street and Ballona
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics36/00037806.jpg


Don't like smoke, fire or heat?


1929 - Wind machine to help fire fighters stay cool
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics49/00044206.jpg


1945 - Seal Beach. Explosion led to death of five men as diagrammed
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00099/00099363.jpg




Source identifies this image as Miracle Mile, but particulars, including address and date, are unknown.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00099/00099425.jpg





Quote:
"Broken line traces the course of a boiler casing that was blown 100 feet high and landed 150 feet away when a Santa Fe work train locomotive exploded at Doheny Park. B. J. Blake, engine watchman, was killed. His body was found 430 feet away.
1949
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00099/00099359.jpg




1949 -
Quote:
A dynamite blast in the Broadway Tunnel on September 21, 1949 during its demolition touched off a false earthquake scare in the Civic Center and vicinity. The black arrow points to the courtroom where the Mickey Cohen trial was under way. Several spectators left hurriedly. The white arrow shows what's left of the tunnel after the blast. Concrete sections blasted away lie in the foreground.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics50/00044953.jpg
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  #27414  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 10:27 PM
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1888 Los Angeles Panorama

Here is a two-shot panorama from the Denver Public Library's William Henry Jackson collection. The photos look south from the hillside just south of what is now the Dodger Stadium parking lot. DPL estimates the date at c. 1885-1910, but I'm fairly certain the photos were taken around the spring of 1888. There is some overlap between the two photos.

The Left Half

Running left to right across the bottom is Bernard Street. The "T" intersection of Bernard and Yale Street is just to the right of bottom center, partially obscured by the tip of a plant in the foreground. Near the left edge of the photo, smoke is coming from the Baker Iron Works, which fronts on Buena Vista Street (now North Broadway). The largely empty area between Buena Vista and Yale is the excavation of the City Brick Company. The street parallel to and between Buena Vista and Yale that ends at the south end of the excavation site is Castelar Street (now North Hill).

Denver Public Library -- http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm...id/12624/rec/2

This is a closeup of the area just south of the brickyard excavation. At bottom center, the two-story building with the two one-story wings and the big front yard is the French Benevolent Society Hospital. The building to the south with the tower is the Castelar Street School on the SW corner of Castelar and College. In the upper left corner is the Clinton Block at the NW corner of what was then Upper Main and Walters (now North Spring and Ord). The Clinton Block will later be known as the Sunset Hotel. It is not in the 1887 LA City Directory, but it's in the 1888 CD.




Here's a closer look at the Baker Iron Works; behind it, through the smoke, you can barely make out the Capitol Milling building on Alameda. The three-story building to the right of Baker Iron Works, with the writing on the left side and across the top, is occupied by the Heywood Bros. It is on the SW corner of Upper Main and College St. That building burned down on November 9, 1887, but in this photo it has obviously been rebuilt.

The three-story building next to Heywood Bros, which is actually on the NE corner of Buena Vista and College, is the Mullally Block. The July 1, 1887 Los Angeles Times describes the plans for the Mullally Block as being "in the hands of the architect," so its construction must not have been far off. At the far right edge of the photo past the Mullally Block is the Woodhead residence on the SE corner of Buena Vista and College.




Here's the Woodhead residence in 1883. The note at USCDL indicates the home was "built by Mullally," which would have been Joseph Mullally, Los Angeles brick maker and builder of the Mullally Block across the street. [Upon further review, this might be quite a bit after 1883. The house looks a bit run down, like the porch used to wrap around the house.]

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si.../id/1726/rec/4

The Right Half

The U-shaped industrial plant just to the left of the middle of the photo belongs to the Los Angeles Pressed Brick Company at the SW corner of College and Cleveland, which is one block west of Yale. The road in the right foreground that runs off into the ravine is now Stadium Way; today you'd pass the old Naval Armory on the right just up the hill on that road. The trees barely visible in the lower right corner are planted around the old Jewish Cemetery in the ravine.

Denver Public Library -- http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm...id/12621/rec/1



Here's a closeup of part of the right half. Near the upper right corner is the original Los Angeles High School building (at this time known as the Central School) with the Fort Moore Hill Cemetery (labeled the IOOF Cemetery on the 1888 Sanborn Map) in front of it. The Los Angeles Pressed Brick Company at Cleveland and College is in the foreground.

Behind and to the left from the LA Pressed Brick Company, bounded on the west by Cleveland, on the east by Yale and on the south by Virgin (later Alpine), are the modest buildings of the Los Angeles Orphans' Home Society, which sit on the back of the lot next to Cleveland. The 1888 Sanborn Map indicates that a larger, three-winged structure was being built on this site, and the December 2, 1888 Los Angeles Times says that the building had just been completed and was ready for occupancy. Since in this photo the construction of that new building hasn't even begun yet, that's why I date these photos at around the Spring of 1888. BTW, at the left edge of the photo, near the base of the hill, is a windmill at the SW corner of Castelar and Walters (previously High Street, later Ord Street), which you'll see in the next two photos.




These next two photos are not by William Henry Jackson, but look north at Sonoratown and the hillside where Jackson took the panoramic photos, which must have been near that trail leading up the hillside at the center of the photo. The old Jewish Cemetery can be seen in the ravine in the distance at the left side of the photo below, taken c. 1885. The windmill at the SW corner of Castelar and Walters is in the foreground.

Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single.../id/8307/rec/6



This is more or less the same view north over Castelar Street as the previous photo, but c. 1900. At left you can see the larger Orphans' Asylum building with its central tower. Also, the Castelar Street School has been rebuilt.

Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...id/3614/rec/14

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Mar 9, 2017 at 2:31 AM. Reason: Woodhead photo likely older than 1883
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  #27415  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 11:15 PM
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FlyingWedge wrote:

"The old Jewish Cemetery can be seen in the ravine in the distance at the left side of the photo below, taken c. 1885."


Huntington Digital Archive

I was wondering whatever happened to the Jewish Cemetery.

Here it is listed as "Hebrew Cemetery" on a map dated 1897.

https://www.pinterest.com/bigmapblog/


By 1913 it's missing.

http://www.lapl.org/collections-reso...map-collection

I know we've discussed the removal of bodies from the larger Calvary Cemetery (to the east of the Jewish Cemetery), but I don't recall discussing the Jewish Cemetery.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 2, 2015 at 11:33 PM.
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  #27416  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 11:29 PM
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Sunset and San Fernando Hotels

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Refresh my memory. Did someone establish the original building permit dates for the Sunset Hotel (703 N. Spring Street or more likely San Fernando Street) NW corner of Ord? And the original building permit dates for the San Fernando Hotel, NE corner of Ord? Seems like I remember seeing 1888 for both or maybe 1888 for one and 1887 for the other. Can't find any mention in the thread searcher thing. Thanks. Good post coming, I think.
I have a feeling your post will be on one or both of the photos I just posted, so I'm looking forward to it . . . .

Anyway, the 1888 Sanborn shows the Sunset Hotel already built, with the San Fernando Hotel building. That's as close as I could nail it down. The future Sunset Hotel is at the bottom at the NW corner of Walters and Upper Main (now Ord and North Spring), with the San Fernando directly across Upper Main:

LAPL
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  #27417  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 11:37 PM
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Thanks to oldstuff and Wig-Wag for explaining the difference between a city streetcar (left) and a 'blimp' interurban (right). It's much appreciated.


eBay
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  #27418  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 11:38 PM
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It's 1888. Here's a stitched copy.


Sonoratown from Yale Street, 1888

Looking south and southeast from the heights at Yale Street above Calvary Cemetery, William Henry Jackson, 1888.
Among the various clues is the fully constructed Sunset Hotel and the still under construction San Fernando Hotel. Voila, 1888.

DPLdc


The Sunset Hotel and the as yet uncompleted San Fernando Hotel, detail, William Henry Jackson, 1888

The Sunset Hotel and the as yet uncompleted San Fernando Hotel, detail, William Henry Jackson, 1888

DPLdc


Baker Iron Works and Capitol Milling from Yale Street above Calvary Cemetery, William Henry Jackson, 1888

Also shown a good shot of the enormous Union Warehouse at Naud Junction and an as yet unpaved Bruno Street.
Also missing is McCarey's Pavilion or Naud Junction Arena which would be to the left of the Union Warehouse.
Notice the relative absence of rails. This view will ultimately be loaded with rails leading into and out of the 'Cornfield' just out of-frame to the left.

DPLdc


Castelar Street Public School and the French Hospital from Yale Street above Calvary Cemetery, William Henry Jackson, 1888

DPLdc


Poundcake Hill high school building on Fort Moore Hill, 1888

DPLdc

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Apr 3, 2015 at 12:19 AM.
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  #27419  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 11:39 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

FlyingWedge wrote:

"The old Jewish Cemetery can be seen in the ravine in the distance at the left side of the photo below, taken c. 1885."

I was wondering whatever happened to the Jewish Cemetery.
"By 1855 the [Hebrew] Benevolent Society had dedicated a Jewish cemetery in Chavez Ravine, just south of the modern Dodgers Stadium. The burial ground was replaced in 1902 by Congregation B'nai B'rith's Home of Peace Cemetery on Whittier Boulevard in East Los Angeles."

http://home.earthlink.net/~nholdened...os_angeles.htm

info: http://www.backyardtouristsla.com/20...d-stooges.html

Home of Peace Cemetery, lower right
w/ Calvary Cemetery adjacent
Evergreen Cemetery, upper left

google maps

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 3, 2015 at 1:23 AM. Reason: add photo + map
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  #27420  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 11:45 PM
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Thanks t2. Is the "old gate" from the original location?*

*(t2 deleted the photograph I was asking about) It was a pretty cool looking brick gate.
__



I found this interesting 1954 photograph along with the Hollywood Fwy. / Alvarado bus stop photo that we recently discussed.

"Metro Olive St. Bus Depot"



https://www.flickr.com/photos/30993133@N04/

Is that car turning into underground parking?

and does anyone recognize that apartment building from the back?

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 3, 2015 at 3:18 AM.
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