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  #42681  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 12:40 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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And here's a peek inside the Alexandria Hotel on Feb. 3rd, 1915.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Org-PHOTO-19...wAAOSwPc9W14B~





Here's that same room in 2008.

Video Link


-note how the pediments have changed over the doorways. (and faux 'balconies' added)



for search purposes:

Third Annual Banquet
of Old Guardsmen
of the Los Angeles Gas & Electric Corporation
Alexandria Hotel, Feb. 3, 1915
_



supposedly there's a X marking one of the men. (this was written on the back)


detail

*the seller says 'papa' is written by the man as well, but I haven't been able to find the man yet. (are my eyes going? )
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jul 3, 2017 at 1:05 AM.
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  #42682  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 1:35 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwtca View Post
The railroad yard in the lower portion of the photo is Pacific Electric's 8th Street yard. The three tall industrial buildings were known as the Merchandise Mart, most recently occupied by American Apparel.

The building inside the wye track on the right was Southern Pacific's commissary, where passenger cars were cleaned and restocked with supplies in between runs.

Central Station is in the upper right.

All gone now, except for the mentioned buildings.
Small correction, the three tall buildings were Union Terminal Warehous, owned by the Southern Pacific.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42683  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 1:37 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwtca View Post
Washington Street runs east-west through the photo, and south of Washington is the Santa Fe's freight dock, now unused except for occasional filming.

The railroad yard in the bottom of the photo is Southern Pacific's "J" yard. Adjacent to it on the north side is Pacific Electric's Butte Street yard. J Yard was used primarily to sort traffic from the branch to Santa Monica and to interchange with the PE. J Yard still exists, although in a much reduced role, but Butte Street was torn out a number of years ago, and is now where the trench to San Pedro begins to drop below ground level.

Just to the east (right) just out of the photo was Clement Junction. http://www.pacificelectric.org/pacif...unction-tower/
Small correctionButte Street yard became J Yard and Clement Jct was West of Butte Street yard on the West side of Alameda.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42684  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 1:47 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Workman View Post
The buildings next to the 8th St yard were built as the Los Angeles Union Terminal - not for passengers but for produce etc. That site was originally used for the Huntington System shops. LARy moved to 54th and ?San Pedro, and those buildings were torn down in the last few years. PE moved its shops to Torrance ca 1917 to clear the site..
The Wye at lower right was the west end of the SP coach yard.. SP Locomotives came from and went to the Alhambra Avenue Roundhouse- we've seen pic of LARy service to that site. When LAUPT was built the coach yard moved to the south side of the Shops site. That yard became a city of Pullman cars when the Shriners came to town ca 1950-ishBefore that was built, including the SP General SHops, the roundhouse was roughly centered in the site now known as Cornfield Park. I need some help here, as there were two yards, end to end there after the roundhouse was moves. I've always assumed tht Cornfield was the westerly one of the pair and the other was The Bullring. Perhaps WigWag or Paul Koehler will affirm or correct
Ed, let me try to help you out. What is refered to as the Cornfield yard was actually three yards, The Cornfield, The Bullring and the Links all connecting to the north to MidWay yard and then across the river to Taylor Yard. The LA General Shops and the new Coach Yard were located in what is now known as LATC or the pig ramp. Did that clear it up?

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42685  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 3:28 AM
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Worst Company in America?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
.
I was searching NLA this morning and noticed a LOT of photobucket photos missing. From many different posters. Is photobucket up to something again, or is it down today? I've never seen a notice before, either, like the one below as an example.
Photobucket has updated its Terms of Service and Pricing Structure.

The image below is from my Photobucket account page. As you can see, after posting at NLA and elsewhere for 5 years
I'm at 1% of storage. My current subscription ($30 a year) runs through September. However, after that, if I want to use
Photobucket for image hosting, I'll have to pay $399.99 -- a 1,233% increase! And given Photobucket's past reliability
problems, I wouldn't be surprised if people who pay the extra $ end up having to relink all their images anyway.



FW image
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  #42686  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 3:35 AM
Mstimc Mstimc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
"4th of July picnic in La Canada Valley [1890s]


ebay

note the fancy cushions on both sides of the blanket.

reverse / writing upper right corner


as you probably already know, the La Canada Valley is northwest of Pasadena.

__
Ok, after seeing a ton of pre-mid 20th century summer photos, I have to ask myself; Given the way they're dressed, was it never hot in the summer before 1920? My God, I'd sweat to death in those clothes!
__________________
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  #42687  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 8:03 AM
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Mrs. Watson and the Girls' Home

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

"On June 11, 1887, the Los Angeles Police Department’s baseball team (The Police Nine) played a game of ball
against the Town’s Sheriff Department’s baseball team (The Constable Nines) at Sixth Street grounds in Los Angeles.
The Police Nine vs. The Constable Nine rivalry brought out a huge crowd, including Los Angeles Police Chief
John K. Skinner, and other City officials. The game raised $244.95 for Mrs. Watson's Home for Stray Girls."


I checked the city directories for a Mrs. Watson's Home for Stray Girls.
but all I found were several widows (named Watson) that might possibly have been the place.

I have to say that the use of the term 'stray girls' was rather unfortunate (it made me think of stray dogs )

In Illinois we had schools for 'wayward' girls. There was one out in the country near my hometown.
By the time I came along, the school was long closed but the big old scary building still stood.
We were always told it was where rich people in Chicago sent their daughters if they became pregnant
before marriage.

(of course Mrs. Watson might have simply meant run-away girls)

I digress.
__
Thank you for reminding me about Mrs. Watson, e_r. I bumped into her last year while researching the LAPD of the 1880s and 90s.
Mrs. Helen A. Watson was the LAPD's first Matron. I know Lucy Gray is said to have been appointed the first LAPD Matron in 1888,
but that is not correct. Mrs. Watson was appointed Matron to support her work with young girls (and boys, too). The reasoning was,
if it weren't for Mrs. Watson, the police would end up dealing with many of the girls and boys, either because they had become
criminals, or they had become victims of crime.

The Girls' Home, mentioned in the article you quoted about the baseball game, opened in temporary quarters at 11th and Myrtle
(now Wall) on July 6, 1887 (a Times article on July 2 explained that Mrs. Watson needed to rent a home now, rather than wait to
find a place to buy):



July 7, 1887, Los Angeles Herald at CDNC


Mrs. Watson shared your distaste for the term "stray girls," e_r, though only as it applied to the girls under her care:



July 12, 1887, Los Angeles Herald at CDNC


The permanent location for the Girls' Home turned out to be 13 Fuller Street:



November 12, 1887, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


Here's the Girls' Home in the 1891 LACD at 2150 Glowner:



fold3.com


That's not because the home moved, it's because Fuller became Glowner:



February 6, 1889, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


The site of 2150 Glowner is marked by a blue dot:



October 1, 1895, Grider and Dow Map, 249513 at Huntington Digital Library


Eventually 2150 Glowner was renumbered and renamed 2230 Wall. It's been replaced by an apartment building:



Jan 2017 GSV


In late 1897, the Girls' Home sort of dissolved, and the Los Angeles Boys and Girls Aid Society (not Home Society) apparently
took over the assets of the Girls' Home (Lot 13 is 13 Fuller/2150 Glowner):



December 15, 1897, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


In 1898, the Boys and Girls Aid Society built an orphanage at Mission and Orange Grove in South Pasadena, now the site
of Orange Grove Park. That facility was condemned in 1925, and the following year the current facility opened in Altadena.
It's called Five Acres, and it traces its origins back to the founding of the Los Angeles Boys and Girls Aid Society in 1888 --
by, among others, Mrs. Watson:



May 22, 1888, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


Oh yeah, about the Matron thing . . . on August 1, 1888, the LA Police Commission appointed Mrs. Helen A. Watson as the
LAPD's first Matron (she was "H. A." not "M. A."):



August 2, 1888, Los Angeles Herald at CDNC




August 2, 1888, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


However, Mrs. Watson was interested in helping children, not in searching or attending to women brought to the jail:



August 30, 1888, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


There was continued opposition to the idea of a Police Matron, Mrs. Watson was not performing all the duties expected of
her, and some of the things she did seem to have rubbed some people the wrong way. As a result, the Police Commission
voted to eliminate the position of Police Matron on January 9, 1889 ("His Honor" is Mayor John Bryson):



January 10, 1889, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


Mrs. Watson wanted her job back:



April 25, 1889, Los Angeles Herald at CDNC


But when the Police Matron position was reestablished, it went to Lucy Gray:



July 11, 1889, Los Angeles Herald at CDNC


Mrs. Watson, who lived at 6 Sand (just east of Fort/Broadway) then 920 Bartlett (I think that's now part of the
Harbor Freeway, just north of Sunset), eventually moved to somewhere in Colegrove, where she died in 1899:




September 12, 1899, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Oct 16, 2018 at 8:09 AM. Reason: image link editing
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  #42688  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 12:26 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Anyone familiar with Cheviot Hills/Monte Mar Vista/WLA? Trying to identify this house...it appears in two different Hal Roach 1930s short comedies in the '30s--Mixed Nuts and Luncheon at Twelve. It may have been in/may still be not too far from the site of the Hal Roach Studios. (Or elsewhere in the city. Could it have been an actual achool? I'm noticing what may be a long wing at left in the first view....unless this is another house)....






Still trying to find this house...or is it a school or some other kind of institution? Now there is an additional clue-- the address on the right-side gatepost, seen in the picture below. The number is "320X" with the letters "CO"-something centered above. It may just be a house, but there appears to be a large wing to the right and whatever that is to the left.... Here are more s/s's:








...and from the porch toward the gate...

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  #42689  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 1:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
In the childish sick American culture its some sort of sin and defeat if you don't win at everything in life.

So he didn't make to the Big Leagues in baseball....does that make him a failure in life?
Cheers to your take on this. Our culture has tunnel vision. Best thing to do is to do just what you did, stand up and say, "C'mon now guys..."
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  #42690  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 2:56 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
I don't know about the top glob-- assume it's just a half-dome of a bulb cover rather than spherical.... but rather than being in L.A., the Packard dealer was in Pasadena at the nec of Colorado and Catalina... D. E. McDanald Packard...gone now.

It's a 28 or 29 Ford AA Express Pickup, not a 1930.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42691  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 3:26 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Can anyone tell me what's going on in front of the Biltmore Hotel? [3-13-43]


ebay

It's obviously some sort of demonstration.

-note the two people watching from their hotel room window at far left.



here's the stamp on the reverse

3-13-43 #271-H
Looks to be some kind of high line transfer demostration.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42692  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 4:08 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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I think this was answered before, but it is a demonstration of a breeches buoy:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breeches_buoy

Crude, but effective.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #42693  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 5:01 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C. Koehler View Post
Ed, let me try to help you out. What is refered to as the Cornfield yard was actually three yards, The Cornfield, The Bullring and the Links all connecting to the north to MidWay yard and then across the river to Taylor Yard. The LA General Shops and the new Coach Yard were located in what is now known as LATC or the pig ramp. Did that clear it up?

Paul C. Koehler
Ed:Now that I think about it, there was a fourth yard, it was located behind the Cornfield and was used for cleaning out freight cars. We converted this area to Intermodal operations after it was no longer used as the cleanout tracks.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42694  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 5:38 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Photobucket has updated its Terms of Service and Pricing Structure.

The image below is from my Photobucket account page. As you can see, after posting at NLA and elsewhere for 5 years
I'm at 1% of storage. My current subscription ($30 a year) runs through September. However, after that, if I want to use
Photobucket for image hosting, I'll have to pay $399.99 -- a 1,233% increase! And given Photobucket's past reliability
problems, I wouldn't be surprised if people who pay the extra $ end up having to relink all their images anyway.



FW image


This is going to be devastating.

Photobucket Just Broke Billions of Photos Across the Web
by Will Nicholls / JUL 01, 2017

https://petapixel.com/2017/07/01/pho...-embedded-web/

Since 2003, the popular photo hosting service Photobucket has been letting users upload and host images for free on their servers. They have over 10 billion images stored by 100 million registered users. But now they’re going to start charging, and that means billions of images around the Web are now broken.

It would have been nice instead if users were asked to pay for any future 3rd party hosting or hot linking as this sudden policy will leave countless sites with unlinked photographs. And no warning.

Photobucket allowed hotlinking photos uploaded to and stored on its servers for a long time. This was their business model, and they made money from ads on their own site, which users would be exposed to when they went to upload content.

Unfortunately for Photobucket users, without warning, things just changed. Now the service is rolling out a $399 per year subscription fee for those who want to hotlink images from Photobucket’s servers to display elsewhere. That means that billions of images across the Web now display an error message instead of the image in question.

The move has sparked fury from users, who have relied on the service for years and now feel “blackmailed” into paying the subscription fee.

Or as the headline from another article says:

Photobucket Says Photo-f**k-it, Starts Off-Site Image Shakedown

Can Photobucket be sued? It's one thing to start a new policy, but to start one that affects up to 14 years of understanding with a company...that seems just wrong.
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  #42695  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 5:46 PM
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Nazimova residence

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Since the Garden of Allah is synonymous with silent film actress Alla Nazimova I was quite surprised to find this postcard of Ms. Nazimova's 'Hayvenhurst' mansion without any mention of her famous Garden of Allah.


ebay

This must be before she built the numerous bungalows on her property. -quite rare-


For an early post on Nazimova's Garden of Allah go here
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ah#post5086290

__

This undated image of Hayvenhurst seems to show the same view as the color postcard, but back a few feet:



Islandora (link not always available)


What's that on top . . . two dragonflies mating?


Last edited by Flyingwedge; Jul 3, 2017 at 8:15 PM. Reason: add Hayvenhurst reference for search purposes
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  #42696  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 7:00 PM
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I'll have to continue with Photobucket for now as the thought of moving 8,000+ images and editing 3,000+ NLA posts to update the image links is too much to comprehend at the moment. There's no way I'm paying $399/year, so I'm open to suggestions for an alternative. I have no problem paying a small annual fee, but raising the rate by over 1000% is just plain disgusting. What's even worse is that I normally suggest members use an image host so they have control over their images!


---------------


I think that today's Julius Shulman post shows an office building. There's no sign of manufacturing or storage. It's "Job 1655: Jones and Emmons, Klein-Norton Co. Building, 1954".



This was the better of the two end shots, although the other shows a "KLEIN-NORTON CO" sign under the windows.



This is obviously just inside the entrance, but I'm not sure if it's a waiting room or casual meeting area.



A little further in we get to see the reception area.



The final shot shows one of the fancier offices, which seems to come with an indoor garden.



All from Getty Research Institute

The Klein-Norton Co was apparently in the clothes manufacturing business. From an article about the Klein family at earthlink.net:
The company was on Ninth and Los Angeles Streets in the garment district of downtown Los Angeles. In perhaps the 1950s, it moved to Culver City (suburban Los Angeles). It was run mostly run by the Nortons until 1940, then by Vice President and General Manager Stephen F. Nordlinger (whose father had married Mamie Norton's sister Esther) from 1940 through his retirement in 1969 and then by his son, Stephen. The company was sold to non-family managers who moved it to Santa Ana, Orange County, about 1980.
The move in the 1950s must have been to the building above. It's still standing at 4200 Sepulveda Boulevard, Culver City.


GSV
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  #42697  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 9:26 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Historic Los Angeles


More on the family and the business here
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  #42698  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2017, 9:42 PM
Ed Workman Ed Workman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C. Koehler View Post
Ed, let me try to help you out. What is refered to as the Cornfield yard was actually three yards, The Cornfield, The Bullring and the Links all connecting to the north to MidWay yard and then across the river to Taylor Yard. The LA General Shops and the new Coach Yard were located in what is now known as LATC or the pig ramp. Did that clear it up?

Paul C. Koehler
Got to get a trackmap out to see the Links
Thanks a load
Ed
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  #42699  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2017, 12:54 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Originally Posted by Ed Workman View Post
Got to get a trackmap out to see the Links
Thanks a load
Ed
Ed:

Start from the South end, and follow the lead that goes diagonally through the yard. The tracks to the West of the double slip switches would be the "Cornfield" and the tracks to the East would be the "Links". The clean out tracks were close to North Broadway at the Chinatown end, and the tracks at the north end before you go under North Broadway was the Bullring. The "Cornfield was named as that where grain cars were spotted for inspection by the Federal Grain Inspectors. The Bullring was where stock was rested when needed, stock pend were gone by the early fifties. As you know once something gets a name on the railroad it stays even if it no longer applies.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42700  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2017, 5:26 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Happy Birthday E_R!


The Los Angeles cake designed by Richard Ruskell

For additional amusement:

8 Los Angeles Landmarks Rendered in Cake
https://la.curbed.com/2014/4/21/1011...ndered-in-cake
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