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  #601  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2019, 1:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
The numbers for NS seem really... wrong. It seems impossible that we would have as much hydro potential as Newfoundland (even if we're just talking untapped potential), nearly as much as Manitoba, and 8.5 times as much as New Brunswick. Maybe someone added an extra zero by accident?
They might be including tidal energy potential? I'd imagine that would be included in hydropower. Though that would still beg the question as to why NB is so low...
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  #602  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2019, 1:55 AM
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The (lack of) scaling of those bars is painful.
Dont tell me! It's the first thing I noticed, and it's a cardinal sin (those are one of my pet peeves). Worst even than "Acadian" mixed forest :p
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  #603  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 2:34 AM
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  #604  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 3:40 AM
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Originally Posted by ainvan View Post
Very interesting that the wine regions of Quebec are pretty much.. um.. the same thing as the administrative regions?

The fact that BC is highlighted in the middle graphic, and the BC wine regions actually make sense, makes me think this was just thrown together by someone from.. BC?
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  #605  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 10:58 AM
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Ontario is the largest producer of wine in the country but you would never guess it from looking at that. What was the prerequisite of being a wine region in Quebec? It looks like a powerhouse but they produce very little wine, simply don't have the climate for it

In 2015, Canada produced 56.2 million litres of wine, with 62 per cent of that total originating from Ontario. The second largest wine-producing province, British Columbia, constitutes 33 per cent of Canada's wine production.[2] Between 2006 and 2011, 68 per cent of Canadian wine exports came from Ontario-based wineries; with 14 per cent of exports originating from British Columbia, 12 per cent from Quebec, and six per cent from Alberta.

Different source, not as exact, but still...
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  #606  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 5:03 PM
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Originally Posted by harls View Post
Very interesting that the wine regions of Quebec are pretty much.. um.. the same thing as the administrative regions?

The fact that BC is highlighted in the middle graphic, and the BC wine regions actually make sense, makes me think this was just thrown together by someone from.. BC?
Abitibi-Témiscamingue seems like a bit of a stretch as a wine region.

The true wine regions where you'll find field after field of grape vines are much smaller than what this map suggests. Most of the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island wine regions on that map are mountains. In Nova Scotia, the main wine area is around the eastern end of the Annapolis Valley and covers maybe 1/10 of that highlighted area. There are a few South Shore wineries but it's a huge stretch to call that a wine region.
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  #607  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 5:12 PM
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Here's a better map. (Apologies for the large size.)

I'm going to point out that it actually notes that there exists ONE winery in Abitibi but that it's not even on the map.

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  #608  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 5:14 PM
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Also, note that that's strictly area, not yearly production. The more northern ones may have a large area but only planted with one specific type of grapes that's more hardy and yields less, for example (which is not only perfectly conceivable, but even likely).
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  #609  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2019, 5:18 PM
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Originally Posted by DrJoe View Post
What was the prerequisite of being a wine region in Quebec?
Obviously, that the Administrative Region would have at least one wine operation on its territory that manages to (regardless of how hardscrabblely) produce at least one bottle of something that can pass as wine per year.

In that sense, that map was technically correct - though flawed, in my opinion (when considering its intended use and the general level of knowledge of the audience).
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  #610  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2019, 11:54 PM
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  #611  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2019, 1:06 AM
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Abitibi-Témiscamingue seems like a bit of a stretch as a wine region.

The true wine regions where you'll find field after field of grape vines are much smaller than what this map suggests. Most of the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island wine regions on that map are mountains. In Nova Scotia, the main wine area is around the eastern end of the Annapolis Valley and covers maybe 1/10 of that highlighted area. There are a few South Shore wineries but it's a huge stretch to call that a wine region.
I've tasted and purchased wine produced in the Témiscamingue region when there as it's not all that far from where I live.

There is a bit of a micro-climate on Lake Temiskaming and there are a few grape growers on a couple of the islands in the lake. They don't have major success every year but they sometimes do quite well.

I believe the best known winery is Le Domaine Des Duc. http://domainedesduc.ca/bienvenue/ I really like their wine jellies to spread on crackers and toast.

Further North, there is a producer of black current wine on Lake Abitibi.
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  #612  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2019, 6:28 PM
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According to winesofcanada dot com there are 278 grape wineries and over 900 vineyards in BC taking up almost 10000 acres as of 2014 so a bit out of date.
Ontario has 17000 acres of vineyards according to same site but no stats on number of vineyards. Another site showed around 180 vineyards.
Hard to find up to date data.
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  #613  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2019, 8:38 PM
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Originally Posted by DrJoe View Post
Ontario is the largest producer of wine in the country but you would never guess it from looking at that. What was the prerequisite of being a wine region in Quebec? It looks like a powerhouse but they produce very little wine, simply don't have the climate for it

Different source, not as exact, but still...

Ontario probably has much more fertile soil conditions then found in B.C, so even thought the wine regions are much smaller they probably produce a greater bounty.
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  #614  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 6:15 PM
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According to the acreage above Ontario has much more land devoted to vineyards than BC, so that doesn't seem to be the case.

Ontario produces 6,100ha over 17,000 acres for .36 ha per acre. BC produces 3,993ha over 10,000 acres for .40 ha per acre, so it would seem BC is slightly more productive.

I don't think it has much do it with soil fertility, both provinces have very fertile areas, but weather conditions. Ontario's wine regions are more hot and humid vs BCs which are hot and arid, which I think is more complementary to grape growing. The growing season in BC, even the interior, is likely a bit longer too.
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  #615  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 6:40 PM
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That pie chart is incomplete. There are two wineries within Moncton city limits, and others down the Memramcook River valley. In parts of the lower Memramcook, with all the orchards, it actually looks a bit like the Annapolis Valley.

I know our production in NB is very low at present, but it is expanding.
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  #616  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 6:49 PM
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In related news I created a colour coded map of regions in Canada that produce good wine:


https://fvmstatic.s3.amazonaws.com/m...PS-01-0006.png
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  #617  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 7:04 PM
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  #618  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 8:17 PM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Ontario produces 6,100ha over 17,000 acres for .36 ha per acre. BC produces 3,993ha over 10,000 acres for .40 ha per acre, so it would seem BC is slightly more productive.
By "ha" do you mean hectare? Because that is just another unit of land area (1 acre ~= 0.4 hectares).

The acreage under cultivation doesn't seem to match output. For example Wikipedia says BC produced around 18 million L in 2015 and according to the wine growers' association NS produced about 4.5 million L in 2015. The output is about 1:4 while the land area is 1:20.

The production ratios closely match the provincial populations which is probably significant. I think the laws might have changed recently but it's historically been hard to sell wines across provincial borders. I'd guess that it's hard to sell from one wine producing province to another, easy to sell into your own province, and more competitive in the non-producing provinces. Such an environment would naturally cause Ontario to have much greater output, all else being equal. And it's a big challenge for producers in a small province like NS.
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  #619  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 9:30 PM
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
In related news I created a colour coded map of regions in Canada that produce good wine:


https://fvmstatic.s3.amazonaws.com/m...PS-01-0006.png
This is the best thing I've seen here in months Bravo
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  #620  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2019, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
By "ha" do you mean hectare? Because that is just another unit of land area (1 acre ~= 0.4 hectares).

The acreage under cultivation doesn't seem to match output. For example Wikipedia says BC produced around 18 million L in 2015 and according to the wine growers' association NS produced about 4.5 million L in 2015. The output is about 1:4 while the land area is 1:20.

The production ratios closely match the provincial populations which is probably significant. I think the laws might have changed recently but it's historically been hard to sell wines across provincial borders. I'd guess that it's hard to sell from one wine producing province to another, easy to sell into your own province, and more competitive in the non-producing provinces. Such an environment would naturally cause Ontario to have much greater output, all else being equal. And it's a big challenge for producers in a small province like NS.
Sorry i was using Dencity's acres with Dr. Joe's circle chart and clearly missed the point of Dr Joe's chart.

Ignore my original post and just focus on my map.

Probably worth noting that Ontario wines, or BC for that matter, don't necessarily use grapes grown in Canada... and often don't, so tracking vineyard space and associating that with wine output doesn't even work.
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