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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2019, 7:12 PM
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Retail Beer vendors can only operate out of a hotel in Manitoba with a minimum number of rooms depending on population of city (minimum 40 rooms in Winnipeg).
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2019, 7:55 PM
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Restaurants and bars are allowed to resume selling alcohol fairly early in the morning. Like 7 am or 8 am. I've seen people drunk in restaurants at 9 am on a Sunday morning with booze on the table with their breakfast.
Do any in Hull area open that early? Taverne le whip? The British Hotel in Aylmer before it became all fancy and that.?

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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2019, 8:28 PM
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Do any in Hull area open that early? Taverne le whip? The British Hotel in Aylmer before it became all fancy and that.?

https://www.tourismeoutaouais.com/en...aouais-region/
I honestly have no idea, but I checked the hours posted for Le Whip and Taverne Montcalm on the Net, and they give 8 am as an opening time! No idea if that's actually accurate (these places don't have their own websites), but... now that I think of it, I go by Le Whip occasionally in the morning (genre, between 8 and 9 am) and there do seem to be people there who are working, or people arriving for work.

So who knows?
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2019, 8:32 PM
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I believe the de facto strip club ban in Nova Scotia exists because municipalities won't give out business licenses. This issue was discussed more years ago when the Lighthouse (not joking about the name) was closing down and NIMBYs didn't want any new places to open.

This type of interference is common and is happening with marijuana stores in provinces where sales are not provincially controlled. Various municipalities around metro Vancouver say they are happy with legalized marijuana but the sales should happen in some other city.

In my opinion it's a perversion of zoning and business licenses and provinces should crack down on it. City councils shouldn't be picking and choosing which businesses are allowed to operate on an ad-hoc basis.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2019, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I honestly have no idea, but I checked the hours posted for Le Whip and Taverne Montcalm on the Net, and they give 8 am as an opening time! No idea if that's actually accurate (these places don't have their own websites), but... now that I think of it, I go by Le Whip occasionally in the morning (genre, between 8 and 9 am) and there do seem to be people there who are working, or people arriving for work.

So who knows?
Maybe the next SSC Ottawa get together should be at le Whip on a Monday morning at 8 am. I'm sure there is a colourful group of regulars there.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 3:05 AM
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I believe the de facto strip club ban in Nova Scotia exists because municipalities won't give out business licenses. This issue was discussed more years ago when the Lighthouse (not joking about the name) was closing down and NIMBYs didn't want any new places to open.

This type of interference is common and is happening with marijuana stores in provinces where sales are not provincially controlled. Various municipalities around metro Vancouver say they are happy with legalized marijuana but the sales should happen in some other city.

In my opinion it's a perversion of zoning and business licenses and provinces should crack down on it. City councils shouldn't be picking and choosing which businesses are allowed to operate on an ad-hoc basis.
In Ontario, municipalities can decide if they are in or out on hosting privately owned pot stores. If they're out, no stores can open in their borders. If they're in, they can't have any special rules for them.. they have to be treated the same way any other retailer is treated in all zoning and licensing laws. Once a city decides they are in, they can't go back out.. deciding to host cannabis stores is an irreversible yes.

I like this approach. It ensures that NIMBYs can't nitpick weed stores into non-existence. They have to either accept them as any other retailer, or reject them entirely.

Most of the 905 cities have rejected weed stores, but a few have accepted (Brampton and Ajax have opted in), but most of the cities in the province have accepted including Ottawa and Toronto.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 3:58 AM
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Still with alcohol, does anyone know if Ontario still restricts drinkers to fenced-off beer gardens during festivals? The assumption being that everyone in "licensed premises" must be over 19. Unless of course it's a restaurant, which most festivals cannot be presumed to be. (And there is a percentage of food sales relative to booze sales involved.)

Obviously a beer or wine festival in Toronto or Ottawa is a 19+ only event, and so you can walk around with your drink anywhere. The entire facility is "19+ licensed premises".

But for many festivals, you don't want to prevent families with kids from attending.

As I said, unsure if Ontario have changed their rules, but in Quebec in a festival you can buy your booze and walk around with it anywhere you want. Even if there are little kiddies around.

In downtown Montreal when big festivals are on the "festival zone" often encompasses multiple blocks, so drinking is allowed everywhere. And a bit beyond too as enforcement is lax.

Even if there are lots of little kiddies in the vicinity.
Festivals had to have the fenced off "beer tent" or "beer garden" in Ontario until 2012. Now you can carry your drink within the festival grounds and there will often be multiple places to get alcoholic beverages.

But if the festival takes place on a public street such as in a downtown area, I'm pretty sure the area where alcoholic beverages are served and consumed still has to be fenced off. At least that's what I've been seeing.

Our simpleton Premier has said that he wants to eventually allow consumption of alcoholic beverages in public parks. Smoking marijuana here is allowed in most public areas yet you can't drink. I'm for having beer and wine in parks if it's with food. But I doubt the Ford PCs will change anything because many of their core 905 supporters probably won't approve.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 4:04 AM
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As I was taught, what you’re calling 4-way flashers are hazard lights, which indicate that a vehicle is a “hazard” on the road, which means that it’s stationary. Switching them on when you’re moving is unlawful, or at least it was when I learned to drive back in the Model T era.
I'm in Northern Ontario and I always turn on my 4-ways when I have to drive less than 10 below the speed limit. It is usually because of poor visibility due to fog or snow. Most other drivers do the same.

I know that transport trucks have to put on their flashers when going 70 km/h or less on highways and it's usually when they are going up steep hills. There are road sign telling them that they have to do that.
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 4:11 AM
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Wild game like caribou, deer, bison, boar is found on menus in fine restaurants and in the meat section of any grocery store in Quebec, but it's not really "wild" (killed by hunters in the woods) AFAIK. It's been raised on a farm and slaughtered in an abattoir in compliance with health regulations.

It's still really good though. Especially caribou... hmmm.
Restaurants and grocers in Ontario still can't serve and sell wild game. But if you don't hunt here, friends and family may offer you some moose or whatever else.

I do agree with the current laws and regulations.
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 4:48 AM
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If you're friends with meat processors (like I am), wild game is accessible through less-than-legal means. They can't sell it, but they can let some walk out the door every once in a while.

Ontario doesn't explicitly outlaw passing on a solid or double yellow line, it's simply ill-advised. I got into an argument with a coworker about this. The law is taught in driving school but it's reinforced that the double line is there for a reason, usually sight lines, hills, or curves. They might also be painted like that in areas that have had issues with passing drivers before, as a way to deter them. Most people don't know that you can pass on double yellows in Ontario, so they don't do it.

Status Indians in Ontario can get an at-the-till tax exemption. Showing their card gets them an instant rebate on the 8% provincial portion of the HST. It isn't mandatory; stores don't have to offer it and a status card holder can file a reimbursement form with Revenue Canada to get the 8% back, but most stores offer it as an incentive to bring in native customers, with stores like Walmart going so far as using signage with Ojicree syllabics on them to explain the policy to northern residents.

The point of sale exemption intended to be used on goods that will be used on-reserve (which means they can't use it for eat-in restaurants or a hair cut) but if I recall correctly, it can be used for legal services. Because this law isn't well understood, many businesses will simply give them the point-of-sale rebate for any item, even if it is being used off-reserve, because it tends to be considered racist to ask for clarification. I've been insulted once before for asking a native person for their card to process the rebate when they weren't Status Indian. Their status card numbers are supposed to be recorded, with a signature, and those receipts are supposed to be filed with HST filings, but few businesses actually do this and Revenue Canada doesn't seem too concerned about enforcing it. Again, likely because questioning it has become taboo and results in you being called racist. The irony of this is that it does create a lot of tension between indigenous and non-indigenous people, to the point that Status Cards are colloquially called "gas cards" or "tax cards".

In the rest of Canada, the exemption typically is only applied if the transaction completes on-reserve, or if the product is delivered directly to the reserve. Ontario's system opens a loop hole that allows Status Indians to get this exemption while living and working in a city, and they can use a card from anywhere in Canada. It's also not uncommon for non-status people to use a spouse's card, or for people with cards to lend them to others. Since it's a requirement that the store get a signature and record the number, if someone other than the card holder is being given the exemption, though they are committing fraud, the store is on the hook for the money since they let it happen. They do have the right to refuse it at any time.

Another sticking point with the exemption is that many stores run systems that require the exemption be processed before any part of the sale commences, which causes frustration at grocery stores because it results in cancelling an order and re-scanning everything. Some businesses (mine for example) have software that gives the option of switching the 13% HST to a 5% GST specifically for this purpose, and we can do that at any point in the transaction. Why we were able to get our software modified to do this but Loblaws and Walmart can't is beyond me. If I had a dollar for every time a white person behind me said "fucking indians" while a status card transaction was being processed I'd have $7.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 5:01 AM
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... when I learned to drive back in the Model T era.
Good try, but that's not true. First, cars didn't yet have turn signals back in the Model T era, and second, I know enough about your Sherbrooke grandpa to know that you weren't anywhere near born back then.
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  #32  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 5:05 AM
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I'm in Northern Ontario and I always turn on my 4-ways when I have to drive less than 10 below the speed limit. It is usually because of poor visibility due to fog or snow. Most other drivers do the same.
I always turn them on for some 15-20 seconds whenever on the freeway it becomes obvious we're all going to have to drastically slow down (115 km/h to much much slower immediately) because traffic's jammed ahead.

Usually, I can see that the drivers behind me pick up on it and turn their own 4-ways, that's when I know mine aren't needed anymore.

Often, my first warning that I'm about to have to quickly slow down a lot is precisely that cars ahead turn their 4-ways on for a bit.

All my recent uses of 4-ways signals have been in cases like this (I've often been on Montreal area freeways lately, and going from fluid to jammed extremely fast is typical). I'm assuming it's natural to drivers everywhere else too...? It seems common enough here - I'm far from alone doing this.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 5:10 AM
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I also turn mine on if I am on a high speed highway and the traffic in front slows down very suddenly, so that the people coming behind me are alerted that something's going on and don't run into me.
I hadn't read that before posting the stuff above, but yeah, that's common behavior here
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2019, 7:14 AM
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Expressway and freeways on-ramps in Quebec have yield signs, which means if you can't merge safely you are supposed to stop on the on-ramp. I have never seen this anywhere else in Canada or the U.S., except certain specific circumstances. In Quebec it's systematic - every single on-ramp is like this.

You're not allowed to pass on a solid yellow line under any circumstances unless it's for a cyclist or a farm vehicle with one of those slow-moving triangle thingies. In Ontario for example, you're legally allowed to pass on a solid yellow line if you think it's safe, but it's not recommended

Public transit buses have absolute priority for merging (signs indicate this on all buses) and when they pull away from bus stops they'll cut you right off sometimes. If you hit them, it's your fault.

If you can't drive at least the speed limit you have to turn on your four-way flashers. This applies when you're in a slow-moving vehicle for whatever reason, or in a sudden downpour or whiteout when everyone slows down suddenly. In my experience this is also a "rest of the world" non-North American thing that's not very common in the other provinces or the U.S. In these instances you will notice that not everyone complies on Quebec highways but most do.
I'm not sure about official laws, but these are all conventional in NS.
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  #35  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2019, 12:28 AM
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I think this is unique to NL (please correct me if I'm wrong), but Licence Plates stay with the vehicle, and not the owner. You buy a new car, you get a new plate.
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  #36  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2019, 12:52 AM
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I think this is unique to NL (please correct me if I'm wrong), but Licence Plates stay with the vehicle, and not the owner. You buy a new car, you get a new plate.
It's like that, or similar, in BC too; when I got a new car I also got a new plate, and could not just transfer my old one.
edit: Although it seems to usually work this way, it's a bit unclear and there may be some choice in the matter.

Last edited by Architype; Feb 5, 2019 at 1:06 AM.
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  #37  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2019, 1:00 AM
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BC probably has similar problems to us (though ours are worst per capita in Canada, given our enormous lower class). We have the highest percentage of drivers without insurance, etc. When you buy a wreck and have plates that are still good for a portion of the year, voila.
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  #38  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2019, 2:32 AM
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In Ontario, license plates from 1973 and later are still valid, so it's not uncommon to see a brand new car with a really old license plate. You can use any license plate since 1973, so if you've got a pair from 1974 hanging on a wall, you can go out a buy a car today and use them on that car, provided it was properly recorded that the vehicle they were once assigned to has been properly sold or scrapped and the plate serial is unassigned. With special permission, cars older than 1973 can use a pre-1973 plate, but it will be considered a vanity plate and the vehicle will need proper license plates to travel on highways. Classic car collectors use them for display vehicles, but road worthy vehicles just have regular license plates regardless of age.

Typically if you buy a new vehicle, the dealership will go and get plates for you, so you'll get new ones. It's probably possible for a vehicle to retain its plates if it changes ownership but I imagine there is more paperwork that way, it's just easier to get new plates.
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  #39  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2019, 10:54 AM
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Interesting that people are given the option to transfer old plates or get new ones. I wonder if it's an attempt to retire the older plates?

NL doesn't have vanity plates, so the only plates that can be transferred to a new car are veteran, and radio call sign plates.
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  #40  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2019, 3:33 PM
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In Ontario you cannot touch the dancer with your hands. In Quebec the dancer is allowed to let you put your hands on her/his breasts and butt but not genitals. And it is considered part of a normal lap dance.
There is a difference between law and practice on that one....
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