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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2016, 10:08 AM
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I can understand the low-income community's fear of being compromised by progress, but this is Manhattan; the city of skyscrapers!
Certainly, they understood this when they moved in years ago, that's why they live there.
Oh hey, they could always consider other areas across the river for the benefit of gaining skyline views.

As a skyscraper fan, I see it as a huge win for the city!
The taller, the better!!!
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2016, 12:18 AM
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http://therealdeal.com/2016/12/16/tw...the-lions-den/

Two Bridges developers head into the lion’s den
JDS, L+M, CIM and Starrett facing resistance from community over three megaprojects



December 16, 2016
By Rich Bockmann


Quote:
Michael Stern was approaching the lectern when a booming voice from the back of the Gouverneur Health Center on Madison Street stopped him in his tracks. “Boo!” the young man screamed, directing his anger at the JDS Development Group CEO and stunning the room into silence. “You greedy corporate fuck! Fuck JDS, you greedy corporate motherfucker!”

The outburst set off 10 minutes of argument between factions of attendees who wanted to hear representatives for developers who collectively plan a quartet of massive residential towers in Two Bridges, and those who felt the developers were indifferent to the community’s concerns, putting on a dog-and-pony show to inveigle public support.

The former bloc eventually won out. For the next hour or so Stern and his fellow developers from L+M Development Partners, CIM Group and Starrett Development discussed their projects in the context of an environmental impact study that will assess how the combined developments will affect traffic congestion and school enrollment in the neighborhood, which includes mostly low-income- and senior housing.

Opposition to new development has been brewing in the neighborhood for years, but hit a flashpoint when Extell Development began working on its 800-foot-tall One Manhattan Square condo tower at 250 South Street, which is already rising about two dozen stories out of the ground.

Extell’s project, along with the three others set to rise next to it along the East River, are being developed of-right, meaning they need no special approvals from the city to go forward.

But after a failed attempt to force them through the city’s laborious land use-review process, the trio of developments will now undergo an environmental study to determine what – if anything – can be done to mitigate any negative effects they’ll have on the community.

Attendees brought up topics like construction noise, displacement and the light and air the tall towers would block.

Gary Handel, the architect for the pair of 730-foot and 800-foot-tall towers L+M and CIM are developing at 260 South Street, said the team had originally considered a broader, single building rising 600 feet tall. But that would have blocked light and air going into the pair of Section 8 buildings L+M and CIM own next door, so they decided to go with a pair of taller but skinnier towers.

“That creates a taller building, but allows light and air into that courtyard,” he explained.
Stern noted that while his 247 Cherry Street development and the other buildings will add about 2,700 new housing units to the area, all of the developers are setting aside 25 percent of the apartments at below-market rents.

“We’re building a lot of market-rate units, which I think is a big focus. But this is also the single-largest creation of affordable units in one shot in this district in a very long time,” he said.

Still, the big question that remained unanswered by the end of the meeting is what would be done to temper the inevitable gentrification these three projects will bring to the area. Stern said it was up to the local elected officials, the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development and the developers to decide what income levels to set the affordable units at. The answer was not a crowd-pleaser.

Neighborhood resident Ozzie Hernandez was particularly concerned about what would happen to the Stop 1 Deli at 265 Cherry Street, one of the existing L+M/CIM buildings adjacent to its planned 1,350-unit complex.
Hernandez said Stop 1, the only source for food near the building, had been in court for the past year with L+M.

“So what’s going to happen?” he asked. “Are you going to renew their lease? Or is it going to be commercial displacement?”

A representative for L+M, Katherine Kelman, said the developer wasn’t looking to do expensive big-box retail at the site, and the kinds of retailers the company is looking for are in the vein of food or other similar neighborhood retail. She said that once the project moves closer to construction, “we’ll have to have a conversation with the owner of that business to see if they’d like to stay.”

“So what you’re saying to me, if I understand you correctly,” Hernandez responded, “is if they want to say in the community there’s an opportunity to stay and we’re not talking about tripling their rent as a way to get them out, because that’s always the option that you guys have to do that. It’s very simple for you to say, ‘Yea we want you to stay, but you’ve got to pay four times your rent’ and make it unattainable for them.”

“We understand and we know that tenant very well,” Kelman said. “It will be a discussion closer to that time whether they’d like to stay or not, and we’ll have a commercial discussion at that time.”


http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...dges-area.html

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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2016, 3:41 AM
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yeh well, if the rent goes up, the cost of food goes up as a result. Not a very good outcome for the residents, but hey, at least we get new skyscrapers to enjoy!
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2017, 4:17 PM
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http://therealdeal.com/issues_articl...n-two-bridges/

Rising tensions in Two Bridges
Even with four big towers on the way, developers are facing several hurdles in the area






January 01, 2017
By Rich Bockmann


Quote:
Michael Stern was approaching the lectern when a booming voice from the back of the Gouverneur Health building at 227 Madison Street stopped him in his tracks. “Boo!” the young man shouted, directing his anger at the JDS Development Group CEO and stunning the room into silence. “You greedy corporate fuck! Fuck JDS, you greedy corporate motherfucker!”

The guarded and low-spoken Stern stepped back as community members who showed up at the meeting to hear about three or four megaprojects coming to the Two Bridges neighborhood argued for nearly 10 minutes. On one side of the argument was a faction of attendees who wanted to hear the developers’ plans and how they would affect the neighborhood that sits between the Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. On the other side were those who felt the developers were indifferent to the community’s concerns and merely putting on a dog and pony show to inveigle public support.

The former bloc eventually won out, and for the next hour or so Stern and representatives from L+M Development Partners, CIM Group and Starrett Corporation discussed their upcoming projects, which will transform a neighborhood heavily composed of low-income and senior housing.

When Stern finally got a chance to speak, he laid out what he thought to be the big picture — the fact that all of the developers are setting aside 25 percent of their apartment units at below-market rents. “We’re building a lot of market-rate units, which I think is a big focus,” the 37-year-old developer said. “But this is also the single largest creation of affordable units in one shot in this district in a very long time.”

When Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration downzoned much of the Lower East Side in 2008, city planners stopped short at the boundary of the Two Bridges neighborhood, where land-use rights have largely remained frozen in time since the city passed the 1961 Zoning Resolution.

There, hidden in plain sight all those years, lies a four-block stretch along the East River with the same key elements that Gary Barnett’s Extell Development Company and Stern’s JDS, among others, used to transform West 57th Street into Billionaires’ Row.


In the blink of an eye, it seems, Two Bridges is set to undergo a radical change, with the planned gleaming towers that will range from 700 feet to more than 1,000 feet tall and add some 3,700 new apartments to the neighborhood. Industry players who know the neighborhood, however, say the influx of development should come as no shock.

“I’m not surprised by these developments,” said Michael DeCheser, an investment sales broker at Cushman & Wakefield who covers the area. “If you were a developer looking to either build inclusionary or generate inclusionary credits, these are the only blocks you could focus on in the area.”

The four-block area that major developers are homing in on contains sites big enough to include an affordable-housing component — which generates building bonuses that allow the developers to construct larger properties. The area also has the necessary R10 zoning, which allows for the densest residential buildings in the city. “If you want to build affordable housing, you have to look for R10, and there’s a very limited amount of it in Manhattan,” DeCheser said.

But it hasn’t all been smooth sailing for the opportunistic builders, as local community groups have pushed to curb out-of-character development in Two Bridges. Back in 2013, the community planning initiative Chinatown Working Group and the Pratt Center for Community Development conducted a study that recommended rezoning the area with a height limit of 350 feet. And earlier this year, City Council member Margaret Chin, who represents the neighborhood, spearheaded a failed effort to force three of the planned towers to go through the city’s arduous Uniform Land Use Review Procedure.
City Planning Commission Chairman Carl Weisbrod determined a few months later, however, that the developers could build their towers as of right, which means no additional approvals from the city would be required.

“I understand it’s as of right, but that doesn’t mean it is right,” said Trever Holland, a member of several community groups in the neighborhood.

“There’s absolutely no infrastructure to handle the Extell [project], let alone the other projects.”

Meanwhile, change in the neighborhood may not end along the waterfront.




Quote:
There are several blocks farther inland where developers and investors can find additional opportunities to build. In November, for instance, the Midtown-based development firm Ascend Group paid $47.5 million to buy the former Bialystoker nursing home at the edge of the neighborhood at 228 East Broadway. The property came with an adjacent site at the corner of Clinton Street that holds about 40,000 square feet of development rights.

One of the difficulties with finding buildable sites in Two Bridges is the large number of city-owned properties in the neighborhood, according to data from Cushman. Out of the 30 blocks between the Brooklyn Bridge to the west and Montgomery Street to the east, 15 are owned by the city.

Still, in between East Broadway and Monroe Street lie several parking lots that could be turned into additional high-rises. At 40 Henry Street, for example, a handful of properties that run through the other side of the block to Madison Street hold nearly 72,000 square feet of development rights.

And New Jersey-based Edison Properties owns a mini-storage facility along the water at 220 South Street, west of the Manhattan Bridge. The site is currently zoned for manufacturing use, though one of the proposals set forth the by the Chinatown Working Group would upzone it for commercial or residential use, giving the property 670,000 buildable square feet as of right.

At the community meeting last month, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said that neighbors would have a chance to discuss things like affordability levels in the new towers and how the projects would affect school enrollment, traffic and open space. The existence of the towers themselves, however, was a done deal, she noted.

“Would I like to have smaller buildings? Yes,” Brewer said. “But I’m not so sure that would be as possible, but almost everything else is on the table.”


Quote:
260 South Street (L+M & CIM)





One of the city’s largest affordable-housing developers teamed up with one of the city’s largest condo investors this cycle to build a 1 million-square-foot complex on the river.

The partners revealed their plans in December to build 1,350 apartments in two towers connected by a base, the tallest of which will stand at nearly 800 feet. As many as 335 of the units will be set aside for low- and middle-income families. The two companies teamed up in 2013 to buy Lands End II — a pair of Section 8 rental buildings on Cherry Street with 490 units — for $279 million from Starrett. The deal came with a parking lot that sits at the base of the existing buildings and faces the river. L+M plans to develop its new towers on that lot.

“We view this as an opportunity to provide meaningful improvements for our current residents and the broader neighborhood,” said David Dishy, a partner at L+M.

The setup does present at least one hurdle, though: The new towers will block the river views for about 100 apartments in the two Section 8 buildings, so as an olive branch to residents in those apartments, L+M is planning to upgrade the amenities at Lands End II.

Gary Handel, the architect on the project, said the developers had considered building a smaller, single building that would tower over the Lands End II courtyard, but decided instead to go with the two-tower design.

“That creates a taller building but allows light and air into that courtyard,” he explained.
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2017, 10:08 PM
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^ Damn, if all goes well, we'll get to watch another (mini-)skyline in the making.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2017, 6:26 PM
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Quote:
And New Jersey-based Edison Properties owns a mini-storage facility along the water at 220 South Street, west of the Manhattan Bridge. The site is currently zoned for manufacturing use, though one of the proposals set forth the by the Chinatown Working Group would upzone it for commercial or residential use, giving the property 670,000 buildable square feet as of right.
It would be neat if they could capture the airrights from thh adjacent water parcels, which are zoned C2-8. That's a big parcel to draw airrights from.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 11:49 PM
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http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...ns-jan-18.html





Developers website set up for the community...

http://www.twobridgeseis.com/






260 SOUTH STREET

Building Height
East Tower Height: Up to 69 floors/798 feet
West Tower Height: Up to 62 floors/728 feet
Podium Height: 4 floors
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  #28  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2017, 11:57 PM
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As we near the start of the approval process, the DEIS has been released...




















Height







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  #29  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2017, 11:23 PM
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Article pertaining to all of the LES towers mentioned soil sampling is occurring. I wonder if it's only for 247 Cherry or for 260 South parcel as well.

I don't think the heretic NIMBYS will stop this at all. All as of right. Definitely hope they fail, as a public review process would be irritating time table wise.

Anytime I see the magnitude and dominance of the still u/c 1 Manhattan Square, I always try to mentally picture these towers and 247 next to it.
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  #30  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2017, 1:08 AM
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Just an update, that there is a bill being proposed to subject this tower, and the other LES skyscrapers in the pipeline to have to go through the land use process INVOLVING the damn community. Not just here, but impacting the city itself. In other words, the dumb community might have their say on certain things, and cause not only delays, but in theory reductions in projects. Giving NIMBYS some leverage, which is terrible, especially in this city.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2018, 3:43 AM
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https://www1.nyc.gov/site/planning/a...o-bridges.page

1.







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  #32  
Old Posted Nov 26, 2018, 5:37 PM
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From the FEIS...(site 5)






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  #33  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2018, 5:41 PM
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https://therealdeal.com/2018/12/05/c...o-bridges/amp/

City Planning approves controversial trio of resi towers in Two Bridges
Projects will add 3K units, including 700 affordable units



E.B. SOLOMONT
DEC 5, 2018


Quote:
After a bitter and drawn-out review process, the city approved a trio of large-scale residential towers on the Lower East Side waterfront on Wednesday.

In a 10-to-3 vote, the City Planning Commission voted in favor of a controversial application, filed jointly by four developers, to build three residential towers in Two Bridges that together will add 3,000 housing units to the neighborhood. They include JDS Development’s 1,000-unit rental tower at 247 Cherry Street; L+M Development and CIM Group’s 798-foot tower at 260 South Street; and Starrett Corporation’s 730-foot building at 259 Clinton Street.

Combined, the projects represent $4.5 billion worth of investment in the neighborhood, and would add nearly 700 affordable units.
Quote:
In casting her “yes” vote, CPC Chair Marisa Lago said that from a legal standpoint, the buildings comply with underlying zoning rules in the district. “This is nonetheless a challenging situation because the proposed buildings aren’t minor in scale and will affect the surrounding neighborhood.”

But she cited several benefits to the neighborhood, including wheelchair access to the East Broadway subway station, new public space and the addition of nearly 700 affordable units — “a truly rare opportunity” to add affordable housing in Lower Manhattan. “This represents the largest privately-financed affordable housing development in the city’s history,” she said.


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  #34  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2018, 6:20 PM
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Merry Christmas, indeed! A great development and hopefully the last word that shuts out the NIMBY contingent out to gut these developments. At least sanity prevailed on the City Planning Board, and by a good amount..10-3.... realizing there are problems and flaws to be addressed and considered, but overall supporting the great positive good development of this scale will bring the neighborhood, most importantly approximately 700 affordable units. Those don't grow on trees, you gotta build high density and high rise for that.
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  #35  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2018, 6:21 PM
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Based on sketch above:

1. Which three of the four are good to go?

2. What of the other one?

3. Do the Site 5 "twins" count as one single project?
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  #36  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2018, 6:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prezrezc View Post
Based on sketch above:

1. Which three of the four are good to go?

2. What of the other one?

3. Do the Site 5 "twins" count as one single project?

They're counting those twins as a single development. It's three different projects.


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  #37  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2018, 6:50 PM
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Very good news.
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  #38  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2018, 9:23 PM
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Via NY ZAP search (screenshot)


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