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  #81  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 6:27 PM
Bailey Bailey is offline
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It would take a lot for me to leave Houston.

I've thought about it a few times but I keep coming back to the fact that there isn't a single city, in the world, that I would say is as exciting to live in right now, than Houston Texas.

It literally keeps evolving into one of the premiere world cities right in front of our eyes. It's like being in New York City in the 1930s and I wouldn't trade that in for anything.

There is a reason why 100,000k+ have moved here, each year, for the past 2 decades.
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  #82  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bailey View Post
I've thought about it a few times but I keep coming back to the fact that there isn't a single city, in the world, that I would say is as exciting to live in right now, than Houston Texas.

It literally keeps evolving into one of the premiere world cities right in front of our eyes. It's like being in New York City in the 1930s and I wouldn't trade that in for anything.

If any city's having a "New York in the 1920s moment" right now, pretty sure it'd be Shanghai or Beijing. Or Manila, or Jakarta, or Ho Chi Minh City, or Mumbai, Dubai, or one of dozens of other Asian megacities transforming into futuristic first-tier world cities.

Houston's growth is impressive to be sure, and it's urban development is fun to watch, but it's not even the "boomingest" city in Texas.
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  #83  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Bailey View Post
It would take a lot for me to leave Houston.

I've thought about it a few times but I keep coming back to the fact that there isn't a single city, in the world, that I would say is as exciting to live in right now, than Houston Texas.

It literally keeps evolving into one of the premiere world cities right in front of our eyes. It's like being in New York City in the 1930s and I wouldn't trade that in for anything.

There is a reason why 100,000k+ have moved here, each year, for the past 2 decades.
You’re funny.
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  #84  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:22 PM
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It's hard to imagine a city so non-urban, not-walkable, and non-transit being "premiere." Houston is gaining in these areas but even at today's clip it would take a lifetime.
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  #85  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:29 PM
Bailey Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
If any city's having a "New York in the 1920s moment" right now, pretty sure it'd be Shanghai or Beijing. Or Manila, or Jakarta, or Ho Chi Minh City, or Mumbai, Dubai, or one of dozens of other Asian megacities transforming into futuristic first-tier world cities.

Houston's growth is impressive to be sure, and it's urban development is fun to watch, but it's not even the "boomingest" city the US.
It's not about the "booomingest" , it's about the maturation into a true world class city. It's more about the infill development, the strengthening of the districts, and the quality of the developments.

It's the little things that are happening.

All of our major districts are flourishing and filling in quite nicely right now.

Our Medical Center (largest int he world) continues to grow.
Rice continues to be the best University in the state Texas and the University of Houston is in the process of adding a medical school wing to its campus.

Downtown has ambitious goals to significantly increase the residential population and they are succeeding! They are backing that up with even more downtown parks and other residential supporting developments.

Uptown has truly boomed...the numbers of towers here recently is impressive. The City has invested in a major infrastructure project for Post Oak Boulevard, complete with mass transit, and I fully expect that to lead to more high high quality developments.

Midtown continues to go vertical. In fact, an Australian developer has bought a number of Midtown block with the plan of building a "Melbourne District" within Midtown.

NearTown/Allen Parkway (just outside downtown) may be the most exciting. The Allen, Regent Square, Hanover mixed use are all going to be located along Allen Parkway very close to each other...adding 1,000+ new apartment units, condo units, & hotel rooms plus the supporting retail and restaurant. And they aren't cheap which speaks to the wealth investment in Houston right now. Starting prices for a 1 bedroom condo is $600K and a two bedroom starts at a $1 million plus.

But the prize development along Allen parkway is the Ismaili Muslim Cultural Center. They only select ONE city, per country, for their cultural center and they PICKED Houston to be their American location. It is supposed to be an architectural landmark!

Museum District.... Multiple new museums are under construction to add to one of the most impressive Museum lineups for a city NOT named New York City. There is also a number of "infill" developments happening in the Museum District and surrounding areas.

The suburbs are also filling out but I'll leave this to districts 'Inside the Loop' & Uptown. Again, its' not about "height" it's about what is happening to the city on a daily basis. The city never ceases to amaze in how it gets better every single day. Why would I leave a city that is so exciting?
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  #86  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:32 PM
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Houston's "NYC's 30's" moment (and that is a huge stretch) would have been the 70's which abruptly ended with the oil crash in the early 80's. Everything since then has been steady double-digit growth which continues today minus a slump here and there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
It's hard to imagine a city so non-urban, not-walkable, and non-transit being "premiere." Houston is gaining in these areas but even at today's clip it would take a lifetime.
Houston doesn't pretend to be a walkalble/ human focused city. That ship sailed a long time ago. It's the one thing people here bitch about the most. However, "premier" can mean more than just the built environment and Houston ticks a lot of boxes many desire in a major city.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:37 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by Bailey View Post
It would take a lot for me to leave Houston.

I've thought about it a few times but I keep coming back to the fact that there isn't a single city, in the world, that I would say is as exciting to live in right now, than Houston Texas.

It literally keeps evolving into one of the premiere world cities right in front of our eyes. It's like being in New York City in the 1930s and I wouldn't trade that in for anything.

There is a reason why 100,000k+ have moved here, each year, for the past 2 decades.
Happened to Phoenix too you aint special Texas. Texas is all bluster, no bite.
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  #88  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:39 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
It's hard to imagine a city so non-urban, not-walkable, and non-transit being "premiere." Houston is gaining in these areas but even at today's clip it would take a lifetime.
I wouldn't say that is at all a reasonable measure.

LA is largely pedestrian unfriendly, as are several dense Asian mega-cities. They may be crowded but they are not walk-able or transit oriented.

And Dubai? Dubai is worse than anything in the USA
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  #89  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:43 PM
Bailey Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Houston's "NYC's 30's" moment (and that is a huge stretch) would have been the 70's which abruptly ended with the oil crash in the early 80's. Everything since then has been steady double-digit growth which continues today minus a slump here and there.



Houston doesn't pretend to be a walkalble/ human focused city. That ship sailed a long time ago. It's the one thing people here bitch about the most. However, "premier" can mean more than just the built environment and Houston ticks a lot of boxes many desire in a major city.
I disagree...the 70's was basically a "start from scratch" type of boom. That boom was centered around signature type skyscrapers that added nothing to the street level.

This one is entirely different....its more about maturation. True, we may not be getting something the scale of a Chrysler Building, the Empire State Building or a Rockefeller Center but we are getting notable projects that are shaping and strengthening our districts in ways that we haven't seen before.
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  #90  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Bailey View Post
It's not about the "booomingest" , it's about the maturation into a true world class city. It's more about the infill development, the strengthening of the districts, and the quality of the developments.
Houston isn't really an outlier in any of those things domestically. On a global basis, obviously even less so.
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  #91  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:48 PM
Bailey Bailey is offline
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
Happened to Phoenix too you aint special Texas. Texas is all bluster, no bite.
Except 5 of the 15 most populated US cities are actually IN Texas. That's actually 33%...they must be biting something.

This thread is about why people aren't leaving the place they live in. I gave you my reasons..you can agree or disagree but "all bluster, no bite" just shows your insecurity and jealousy.
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  #92  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:53 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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Except 5 of the 15 most populated US cities are actually IN Texas. That's actually 33%...they must be biting something.
The main reason Texas is extremely fast-growing and even an outlier among Sunbelt states is because it's a very young state with a huge cohort of women in child-bearing age. It doesn't have particularly high domestic in-migration.

Demographically, it's like the anti-Pittsburgh (a place that can't grow even though it has healthy inmigration simply because the median age is so high).

Put crudely, TX is growing because of tons of fertile Latinas, and Pittsburgh is declining because of too many old farts.
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  #93  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Bailey View Post
Except 5 of the 15 most populated US cities are actually IN Texas. That's actually 33%...they must be biting something.

This thread is about why people aren't leaving the place they live in. I gave you my reasons..you can agree or disagree but "all bluster, no bite" just shows your insecurity and jealousy.
I am in no way jealous of texas. Your hats look stupid and your accents make you sound dumb

also Austin is overrated and your slogans are based off of seat belt PSA's

pathetic.
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  #94  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 7:58 PM
Bailey Bailey is offline
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The main reason Texas is extremely fast-growing and even an outlier among Sunbelt states is because it's a very young state with a huge cohort of women in child-bearing age. It doesn't have particularly high domestic in-migration.

Demographically, it's like the anti-Pittsburgh (a place that can't grow even though it has healthy inmigration simply because the median age is so high).
I'm pretty sure the Texas cities, at least Houston, Dallas and Austin, have a high domestic in-migration (and from other countries) and not just "a huge cohort of women of child bearing age". Seems like you are just making stuff up now or all of these out of state license plates are part of the conspiracy.

I just love the excuses for why the Texas cities don't match your definition of a "real" city...lol
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  #95  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 8:05 PM
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Houston strikes a really good balance between big city amenities and something that people in denser Northern American cities don’t have—space. You can have a Texas-sized house and still have great big city amenities.

However, I would definitely disagree with this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Houston doesn't pretend to be a walkalble/ human focused city. That ship sailed a long time ago. It's the one thing people here bitch about the most. However, "premier" can mean more than just the built environment and Houston ticks a lot of boxes many desire in a major city.
When talking about urbanity and comparing cities, the built environment is basically the #1 qualifier for a premier city

I’d say Houston is very liveable and I would not be very upset moving there if an opportunity arose that led me there. I have a hard time agreeing that it could in any way be among the most exciting cities to be living in right now, though… it doesn't really excel in any area.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 8:25 PM
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When talking about urbanity and comparing cities, the built environment is basically the #1 qualifier for a premier city

I’d say Houston is very liveable and I would not be very upset moving there if an opportunity arose that led me there. I have a hard time agreeing that it could in any way be among the most exciting cities to be living in right now, though… it doesn't really excel in any area.
Again. It's not 7th arrondissement in Paris. It will never be. It's ugly. The built environment is one facet of a city, albeit, a major one but there is more to an area. Houston has a lot of amenities people desire in a major city; cosmopolitan, the arts, the food, the culture, and so on. These alone put it on the map. If we are strictly talking about urbanity, then sure, it's not even on the radar but I think people here have tunnel vision when it comes to cities and see only what's in-front of them rather than the whole picture. Photolith mentioned Pittsburgh's history and urbanity but it's not progressive. I absolutely love Pittsburgh but could not live there for those reasons. Unless I was a huuuuuge Steelers fan.
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  #97  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 8:42 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Again. It's not 7th arrondissement in Paris. It will never be. It's ugly. The built environment is one facet of a city, albeit, a major one but there is more to an area. Houston has a lot of amenities people desire in a major city; cosmopolitan, the arts, the food, the culture, and so on. These alone put it on the map. If we are strictly talking about urbanity, then sure, it's not even on the radar but I think people here have tunnel vision when it comes to cities and see only what's in-front of them rather than the whole picture. Photolith mentioned Pittsburgh's history and urbanity but it's not progressive. I absolutely love Pittsburgh but could not live there for those reasons. Unless I was a huuuuuge Steelers fan.
How is Houston progressive? The only positive thing that comes to mind when I think of Houston is its diversity. There are people from all over the globe who live there, plus a very significant black population which has made its mark in popular culture. I don't think of it as a hub of culture or museums, nor do I think of it as being particularly cosmopolitan. Also, the very fact that it's in blood red Texas- land of guns, SUVs, and drive-thrus- makes it hard for me to take seriously as a real progressive place.
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  #98  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 9:02 PM
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How is Houston progressive? The only positive thing that comes to mind when I think of Houston is its diversity. There are people from all over the globe who live there, plus a very significant black population which has made its mark in popular culture. I don't think of it as a hub of culture or museums, nor do I think of it as being particularly cosmopolitan. Also, the very fact that it's in blood red Texas- land of guns, SUVs, and drive-thrus- makes it hard for me to take seriously as a real progressive place.
It just sounds like you have very limited knowledge of the city if you think it's guns and drive-thru's and not museums and culture. I though that too when I first moved here but that was before Google was around...
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  #99  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 11:11 PM
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Houston is a great city with many amenities, but it is going to suffer from being a specialized oil and gas town
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  #100  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2019, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
If any city's having a "New York in the 1920s moment" right now, pretty sure it'd be Shanghai or Beijing. Or Manila, or Jakarta, or Ho Chi Minh City, or Mumbai, Dubai, or one of dozens of other Asian megacities transforming into futuristic first-tier world cities.

Houston's growth is impressive to be sure, and it's urban development is fun to watch, but it's not even the "boomingest" city in Texas.
Manila?! Jakarta?!
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