HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 1:18 AM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Interesting about Norridge. It's basically a Chicago neighborhood that never joined the city. I always think of it as being heavily Polish, didn't know about the Italian component.
More than 25,000 Italian immigrants went to Chicago after WWII, according to this book:

https://books.google.ca/books/about/...QC&redir_esc=y

They by-passed the old Taylor St. Little Italy and went to NW Chicago and adjacent inner suburbs.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 1:23 AM
Xing's Avatar
Xing Xing is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 15,339
Little Italy in Albuquerque is probably somewhere between the Olive Garden and Pizza Hut. Lol.

I need to start acting nicer to my new city.
__________________
”Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.” - Mark Twain
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 3:53 AM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
North End, Boston:

Italian ancestry: 2,435 35.6%
Speak Italian: 374 5.6%

Little Italy, Manhattan:

Italian ancestry: 1,222 9.5%
Speak Italian: 53 0.4%

North Beach, San Francisco:

Italian ancestry: 573 4.7%
Speak Italian: 69 0.6%

While keeping in mind the limitations of small samples, this does seem to confirm my impression, having been to all three of these "Little Italys."

I wonder why Boston's has held up so well (even taking into account that Boston is probably the insular of the three, and gentrification there wasn't quite as extreme).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 8:32 AM
Shawn Shawn is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Tokyo
Posts: 5,086
Providence's Federal Hill often gets left out of these discussions, but it is frankly more authentically Italian than Boston's North End; the New England Italian mob was/is run out of Federal Hill, not the North End.

Boston is an IRISH-Italian-other city, whereas Providence is an ITALIAN-Portuguese-irish-other city.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 11:09 AM
Citylover94 Citylover94 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 225
I think the one in Boston stood up so well because there has been a tendency by residents there to try and sell to other Italians and keep the neighborhood Italian. I don't know for certain if that is true, but that is what I have heard from people with connections to the area.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 2:34 PM
brickell's Avatar
brickell brickell is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: County of Dade
Posts: 9,365
NY Metro, Syracuse(?), Providence and Ft Lauderdale...


https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...-by-County.svg
__________________
That's what did it in the end. Not the money, not the music, not even the guns. That is my heroic flaw: my excess of civic pride.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 4:27 PM
Xelebes's Avatar
Xelebes Xelebes is offline
Sawmill Billowtoker
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Rockin' in Edmonton
Posts: 13,036
Edmonton's Little Italy is a ghost. It has a street sign, a grocery store, and two or three restaurants. The diaspora has moved elsewhere, or thinned itself out after having mixed itself. And as far as I can tell, it was ever only four or six blocks, just west of Church Street and north of the New Chinatown, both of which are much more substantial. New Chinatown of course the replacement of the dilapidated deserted area in East Jasper.
__________________
The Colour Green
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 5:17 PM
McBane McBane is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 3,146
The % of people who speak Italian is interesting but probably only tells us where the old school Italians still live. I'm guessing 2nd gen Italians aren't speaking much Italian.

In NYC, as unfashionable as it may be, Staten Island, specifically the south shore is probably the most Italian neighborhood. I recall reading that Staten Island has the highest % of Italians than any other county.

In South Philly, the bakeries and shops are spread on random corners. But even though the area immediately around the Italian Market is no longer majority Italian, there are still plenty of butchers, pasta shops, bakeries, delis, etc. in and around 9th Street. Also a sprinkling of commercial activity along Oregon and Ritner Streets. Seems like a lot of the Italians have left for Washington Township, NJ.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 6:44 PM
blorkishdork blorkishdork is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Passyunk Square
Posts: 361
To add to what McBane said, you also get people from all over the region coming to the markets on 9th street to buy the specialty items which has kept the Italian community going even tho people to live there any longer. With that said, you are seeing plenty of third and fourth generation Americans with some Italian ancestry moving to the area (including my wife). I've even met people whose dad or mom grew up in the neighborhood and they themselves have moved back after growing up in Cherry Hill or Newtown Square. So even tho the area isn't 100% Italian any more, Italian culture still plays a huge role in the area. In-fact my lunch today was mostly bought at Sarcone's Bakery and Claudio's (cheese and deli shop).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 8:17 PM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
NY Metro, Syracuse(?), Providence and Ft Lauderdale...
Utica I think.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 8:28 PM
McBane McBane is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 3,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
NY Metro, Syracuse(?), Providence and Ft Lauderdale...


https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...-by-County.svg
What the eff is "American" ancestry? I don't think, based on the geography where yellow is most prevalent, that this means Native Americans.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 8:28 PM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
Providence's Federal Hill often gets left out of these discussions, but it is frankly more authentically Italian than Boston's North End; the New England Italian mob was/is run out of Federal Hill, not the North End.
According to this site, Federal Hill is 20% Italian (out of a population of 7000). Just 77 Italian speakers (small sample size!) Still, it's probably one of the strongest Little Italies still going though.

http://statisticalatlas.com/neighbor...-Hill/Ancestry

Last edited by Docere; Apr 25, 2016 at 8:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 8:32 PM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBane View Post
What the eff is "American" ancestry? I don't think, based on the geography where yellow is most prevalent, that this means Native Americans.
White Southerners, the vast majority of British descent. English ancestry was the largest reported ancestry in 1980 at about 50 million, but it dropped nearly in half as Southern whites started, effectively, writing "I'm AMERICAN Goddamn It!" on the census.

So today German ancestry is the largest reported and a myth has developed that white Americans are mostly of German rather than British descent.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 12:05 AM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 9,326
Vaughan, Ontario is quite 'Italian'. 94,970 of its 286,054 residents in 2011 were classified as 'Italian', or 33.2%. Woodbridge is part of Vaughan, right? Or as locals say 'Woooood-a-bridge-a'. Little Italy on College West was the original area, then it was Corso Italia, but now Woodbridge in Vaughan is the most heavily Italian. Corso Italia on St. Clair remains important for the Italian community though.

Toronto's Corso Italia after Italy's WC win


Courtesy of torontoist


Courtesy of theallrounder
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; Apr 26, 2016 at 12:18 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 12:10 AM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 18,483
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Vaughan, Ontario is quite 'Italian'. 94,970 of its 286,054 residents in 2011 were classified as 'Italian', or 33.2%. Woodbridge is part of Vaughan, right? Or as locals say 'Woooood-a-bridge-a'.
Wow; that's a very high % over a large geography. The Canadian Staten Island or New Jersey.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 1:05 AM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 9,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Wow; that's a very high % over a large geography. The Canadian Staten Island or New Jersey.
Yep. I'm always struck by how Italian it is. And they seem to have that same accent that Italians in the NYC area have. They sound like that 'Cake Boss' guy.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 1:34 AM
montréaliste montréaliste is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chambly, Quebec
Posts: 1,418
You can also gauge the presence of an Italian nabe by oncoming sports bars. Walked in one the other day for an espresso, a Guy was posted at the door, opened after I rang. They had a coupla pictures of Pacino in Scarface above the bar. No other Italian biz around.

There are so many of these Italian bars that when the saturation bothers the Big fish, they blow up a few. Most of them don't serve food, just coffee, liquor and poker machines.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 3:07 AM
memph memph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Wow; that's a very high % over a large geography. The Canadian Staten Island or New Jersey.
The Woodbridge portion of Vaughan (going by the electoral district, which has about 105,000 people) is 55% Italian origin, with about 1/3 speaking Italian and 1/4 having Italian as their mother tongue.

The other parts of Vaughan are Maple, which has a good number of Italians but also Pakistanis, and Thornhill which is Jewish/Russian with relatively few Italians.

Pretty much the whole NW corridor of Toronto from Corso Italia to Glen Park, Maple Leaf, Downsview, Humberlea, Emery/Humber Heights, Woodbridge, Maple, Bolton, King Township and parts of Richmond Hill have a significant Italian presence.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 4:15 AM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
Woodbridge, Ontario and the South Shore of Staten Island are clearly the biggest suburban Italian enclaves in North America today.

Last edited by Docere; Apr 26, 2016 at 4:50 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2016, 4:19 AM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by north 42 View Post
Via Italia (Erie St.) is the "Little Italy" in Windsor, but also for Detroit. It has grown organically and is still the Italian area of the city. Lots of shops and amazing restaurants, bars and cafes.

http://viaitalia.com
Windsor might have the most thriving "Little Italy" in Canada outside Toronto/Montreal.

Interestingly the average Italian Canadian Windsorite lives closer to downtown Detroit than the average Detroit Italian American does.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:00 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.